Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-25-2013, 03:11 AM
BlazersandWildcats2009's Avatar
BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 191
Transporting Equipment Law

We all know equipment has to be strapped down to the trailer, but a quick question. I there a law stating that thing such as Push Mowers have to be strapped down if your ever transporting in the back of a (Truck?) If there is, does it specify anything specific about it? I often keep the Toros in the back of the pick up, was thinking of just running two eye bolt hooks through the bottom of the bed and running some one strap on each side up and back to the hook, just so I didn't have to worry about getting a hefty ticket since I have plenty of straps laying around. I'd be more interested in hearing the laws on this if someone knows. I'm in Texas to be specific. Also, does anyone know the specific law on trimmers being mounted onto racks? If locked on the rack are they still "suppose" to be tied town with anything additional? Would like to hear the specifics on this? Keep in mind, this is in the back of a truck, I would think it would be no-different then a trailer? Maybe I'm wrong?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-25-2013, 03:17 AM
BlazersandWildcats2009's Avatar
BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 191
I was able to find this information for the State of Texas. Mentions hauling loads such as dirt and loose material, but doesn't mention anything a far a equipment, lawn mowers, etc.

Back to Top
Texas: Department of Public Safety, Austin, TX. 512-424-2051.

Sec. 725.001. DEFINITIONS. In this chapter:

"Load" means a load of loose material.
"Loose material" means material that can be blown or spilled from a vehicle because of movement or exposure to air, wind currents, or other weather. The term includes dirt, sand, gravel, and wood chips but excludes an agricultural product in its natural state.
"Motor vehicle" has the meaning assigned by Section 621.001.
"Public highway" includes a public road or street.
"Semitrailer" has the meaning assigned by Section 621.001.
"Trailer" has the meaning assigned by Section 621.001.
"Vehicle" has the meaning assigned by Section 621.001.
Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.
Sec. 725.002. APPLICABILITY. This chapter applies to any motor vehicle, trailer, or semitrailer operated on a public highway except:
a vehicle or construction or mining equipment that is:
moving between construction barricades on a public works project; or
crossing a public highway; or
a vehicle that is operated at a speed less than 30 miles per hour.
Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.
Sec. 725.003. OFFENSE; PENALTY.
A person or the person's agent or employee may not load or transport loose material in violation of this chapter.
A person, excluding this state or a political subdivision of this state but including an agent or employee of this state or a political subdivision of this state, commits an offense if the person violates Subsection (a).
An offense under this section is a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of:
not less than $25 or more than $200 for a first conviction; and
not less than $200 or more than $500 for a second or subsequent conviction.
Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.

SUBCHAPTER B. REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSPORTING LOOSE MATERIALS
Sec. 725.021. CONTAINING LOOSE MATERIALS.
A vehicle subject to this chapter shall be equipped and maintained as required by this section to prevent loose material from escaping by blowing or spilling.
A vehicle bed carrying a load:
may not have a hole, crack, or other opening through which loose material can escape; and
shall be enclosed:
on both sides by side panels;
on the front by a panel or the vehicle cab; and
on the rear by a tailgate or panel.
The load shall be covered and the covering firmly secured at the front and back, unless the load:
is completely enclosed by the load-carrying compartment; or
does not blow or spill over the top of the load-carrying compartment.
The tailgate of the vehicle shall be securely closed to prevent spillage during transportation.
Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.

Sec. 725.022. MAINTAINING NON-LOAD-CARRYING VEHICLE PARTS.
Loose material that is spilled because of loading on a vehicle part that does not carry the load shall be removed before the vehicle is operated on a public highway.
After the vehicle is unloaded and before the vehicle is operated on a public highway, residue of transported loose material on a vehicle part that does not carry the load shall be removed from the vehicle part.
Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-25-2013, 10:35 AM
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.'s Avatar
A. W. Landscapers, Inc. A. W. Landscapers, Inc. is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 1,304
Try checking section 3 http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/interne...orms/DL-7C.pdf
__________________
Regards,
Scott
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.
www.awlandscapers.com

Hustler X-One 60"
Wright Stander RH 36"
eXmark 21" ECXKA21 Mower
Stihl FC110 Edger
Stihl FS90 Trimmer
Stihl FS55R Trimmer
Stihl HS56C Hedge Trimmer
Stihl MS391 25" Bar Chainsaw
RedMax EBZ7100 Blower
Earthquake 16" Rear Tine Tiller
Honda 9" Mini Tiller FG110
2014 GMC Sierra Denali HD
7' x 16' Enclosed V-Nose Trailer
6' x 12' Dump Trailer
Equipment & Work thread: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=415830
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-25-2013, 11:36 AM
BlazersandWildcats2009's Avatar
BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 191
AWLandscapers, thanks for posting that link, is there anyway you could copy and paste that section for us? I have a brand new computer and for some reason cannot seem to open the link or download the file, it says "That file isn't supported" on my machine. It would be really helpful and appreciated!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-25-2013, 08:35 PM
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.'s Avatar
A. W. Landscapers, Inc. A. W. Landscapers, Inc. is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 1,304
I don't think this is going to copy and paste very well but here it is...

Quote:
Section 3: Transporting Cargo Safely
This Section Covers
J Inspecting Cargo
J Cargo Weight & Balance
J Securing Cargo
J Liquids in Bulk
J OtherCargoNeedingCare
This section tells you about hauling cargo safely. You must understand basic cargo safety rules to get a CDL.
If you load cargo wrong or do not secure it, it can be a dan- ger to others and yourself. Loose cargo that falls off a vehi- cle can cause traffic problems and others could be hurt or killed. Loose cargo could hurt or kill you during a quick stop or crash. Your vehicle could be damaged by an overload. Steering could be affected by how a vehicle is loaded, mak- ing it more difficult to control the vehicle.
Whether or not you load and secure the cargo yourself, you are responsible for:
J Inspecting your cargo.
J Recognizing overloads and poorly balanced weight. J Knowing if your cargo is properly secured.
These are discussed below.
If you intend to carry hazardous material that requires plac- ards on your vehicle, you will also have to have a hazardous materials endorsement. Section 9 of this manual has the information you need to pass the hazardous materials test.
J After Every Break
J After every break you take during driving.
Federal, state, and local regulations for commercial vehicle weight, securing cargo, covering loads, and where you can drivelargevehiclesvaryfromplacetoplace.Knowtherules where you will be driving.
3.2 WEIGHT & BALANCE
You are responsible for not being overloaded. Here are some definitions of weight you should know:
J Definitions You Should Know
Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). The total weight of a single
vehicle plus its load.
Gross Combination Weight (GCW). The total weight of a powered unit plus trailers plus the cargo.
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). The maximum GVW specified by the manufacturer for a single vehicle plus its load.
Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR). The maxi- mum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific com- bination of vehicles plus its load.
Axle Weight. The weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
Tire Load. The maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated on the side of each tire.
Suspension Systems. Suspension systems have a manu- facturer’s weight capacity rating.
Coupling Device Capacity. Coupling devices are rated for the maximum weight they can pull and/or carry.
J Legal Weight Limits
You must keep weights within legal limits. States have max- imums for GVWs, GCWs and axle weights. Often, maximum axle weights are set by a bridge formula. A bridge formula permits less maximum axle weight for axles that are closer together. This is to prevent overloading bridges and road- ways.
3.1 INSPECTING CARGO
As part of your pre-trip inspection, make sure the truck is not overloaded and the cargo is balanced and secured proper- ly.
J Before Starting
Inspect the cargo and its securing devices again within 25 miles after beginning a trip. Make any adjustments needed. Check the cargo and securing devices as often as neces- sary during a trip to keep the load secure. A good habit is to inspect again:
J Every 3 hrs/150 miles
J Afteryouhavedrivenfor3hoursor150miles.
Transporting Cargo Safely/2.0
Page 3-1

Overloading can have bad effects on steering, braking, and speed control. Overloaded trucks have to go very slow on upgrades. Worse, they may gain too much speed on down- grades. Stopping distance increases. Brakes can fail when forced to work too hard.
During bad weather or in mountains, it may not be safe to operate at legal maximum weights. Take this into account before driving.
J Don’t Be Top-Heavy
The height of the vehicle’s center of gravity is very important for safe handling. A high center of gravity (cargo piled up high or heavy cargo on top) means you are more likely to tip over. It is most dangerous in curves or if you have to swerve to avoid a hazard. It is very important to distribute the cargo so it is as low as possible. Put the heaviest parts of the cargo under the lightest parts.
Poor weight balance can make vehicle handling unsafe. Too much weight on the steering axle can cause hard steering. It can damage the steering axle and tires. Underloaded front axles, caused by shifting weight too far to the rear, can make the steering axle weight too light to steer safely. Too little weight on the driving axles can cause poor traction. The drive wheels may spin easily. During bad weather, the truck may not be able to keep going. Weight that is loaded so there is a high center of gravity causes greater chance of rollover. On flatbed vehicles, there is also a greater chance that the load will shift to the side or fall off. Figure 3-1 shows examples of the right and wrong way to balance cargo weight.
Figure 3-1--Always load cargo the right way
Test Your Knowledge
1. For what three things related to cargo are drivers respon- sible?
2. How often must you stop while on the road to check your cargo?
3. How is Gross Combination Weight Rating different from Gross Combination Weight?
4. Name two situations where legal maximum weights may not be safe.
5. What can happen if you don’t have enough weight on the front axle?
These questions may be on your test. If you can’t answer them all, re-read Sections 3.1 and 3.2.
3.3 SECURING CARGO J Blocking and Bracing
Blocking is used in the front, back, and/or sides of a piece of cargo to keep it from sliding. Blocking is shaped to fit snug- ly against cargo. It is secured to the cargo deck to prevent cargo movement. Bracing is also used to prevent move- ment of cargo. Bracing goes from the upper part of the cargo to the floor and/or walls of the cargo compartment.
J Cargo Tiedown
On flatbed trailers or trailers without sides, cargo must be secured to keep it from shifting or falling off. In closed vans, tiedowns can also be important to prevent cargo shifting that may affect the handling of the vehicle. Tiedowns must be of the proper type and proper strength. The combined strength of all cargo tiedowns must be strong enough to lift one and one half times the weight of the piece of cargo tied down. Proper tiedown equipment must be used, including ropes, straps, chains, and tensioning devices (winches, ratchets, clinching components). Tiedowns must be attached to the vehicle correctly (hook, bolt, rails, rings).
Cargo should have at least one tiedown for each 10 feet of cargo. Make sure you have enough tiedowns to meet this need. No matter how small the cargo, it should have at least two tiedowns holding it.
There are special requirements for securing various heavy pieces of metal. Find out what they are if you are to carry such loads.
J Header Boards
Front end header boards (“headache racks”) protect you from your cargo in case of a crash or emergency stop. Make sure the front end structure is in good condition.
Page 3-2
Commercial Driver’s Manual/2.0

The front end structure should block the forward movement of any cargo you carry.
J Covering Cargo
There are two basic reasons for covering cargo, (1) to pro- tect people from spilled cargo, and (2) to protect the cargo from weather. Spill protection is a safety requirement in many states. Be familiar with the laws in the states you drive in.
You should look at your cargo covers in the mirrors from time to time while driving. A flapping cover can tear loose, uncovering the cargo, and possibly block your view or some- one else’s.
You cannot inspect sealed loads, but you should check that you don’t exceed gross weight and axle weight limits.
J Sealed & Containerized
Containerized loads generally are used when freight is car- ried part way by rail or ship. Delivery by truck occurs at the beginning and/or end of the journey. Some containers have their own tiedown devices or locks that attach directly to a special frame. Others have to be loaded onto flat bed trail- ers. They must be properly secured just like any other cargo.
J Oversized Loads
Over length, over width, and/or over weight loads
require special transit permits. Driving is usually limited to certain times. Special equipment may be necessary such as “wide load” signs, flashing lights, flags, etc. Such loads may require a police escort or pilot vehicles bearing warning signs and/or flashing lights. These special loads require special driving care.
Test Your Knowledge
1. What is the minimum number of tiedowns for any flatbed load?
2. What is the minimum number of tiedowns for a 20 ft. load?
3. Name the two basic reasons for covering cargo on an open bed.
4. What must you check before transporting a sealed load?
These questions may be on your test. If you can’t answer them all, re-read Sections 3.3 and 3.4.
3.4 OTHER CARGO NEEDING SPECIAL ATTENTION J Dry Bulk
Dry bulk tanks require special care because they often have a high center of gravity, and the load can shift. Be extremely cautious (slow and careful) going around curves and making sharp turns.
J Hanging Meat
Hanging meat (suspended beef, pork, lamb) in a refrigerat- ed truck can be a very unstable load with a high center of gravity. Particular caution is needed on sharp curves such as offramps and onramps. Go slow.
J Livestock
Livestock can move around in a trailer, causing unsafe handling. With less than a full load, use false bulkheads to keep livestock bunched together. Even when bunched, spe- cial care is necessary because livestock can lean on curves. This shifts the center of gravity and makes rollover more likely.
__________________
Regards,
Scott
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.
www.awlandscapers.com

Hustler X-One 60"
Wright Stander RH 36"
eXmark 21" ECXKA21 Mower
Stihl FC110 Edger
Stihl FS90 Trimmer
Stihl FS55R Trimmer
Stihl HS56C Hedge Trimmer
Stihl MS391 25" Bar Chainsaw
RedMax EBZ7100 Blower
Earthquake 16" Rear Tine Tiller
Honda 9" Mini Tiller FG110
2014 GMC Sierra Denali HD
7' x 16' Enclosed V-Nose Trailer
6' x 12' Dump Trailer
Equipment & Work thread: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=415830
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-25-2013, 08:35 PM
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.'s Avatar
A. W. Landscapers, Inc. A. W. Landscapers, Inc. is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 1,304
The "J" is a bullet point.
__________________
Regards,
Scott
A. W. Landscapers, Inc.
www.awlandscapers.com

Hustler X-One 60"
Wright Stander RH 36"
eXmark 21" ECXKA21 Mower
Stihl FC110 Edger
Stihl FS90 Trimmer
Stihl FS55R Trimmer
Stihl HS56C Hedge Trimmer
Stihl MS391 25" Bar Chainsaw
RedMax EBZ7100 Blower
Earthquake 16" Rear Tine Tiller
Honda 9" Mini Tiller FG110
2014 GMC Sierra Denali HD
7' x 16' Enclosed V-Nose Trailer
6' x 12' Dump Trailer
Equipment & Work thread: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=415830
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-25-2013, 11:09 PM
unkownfl's Avatar
unkownfl unkownfl is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Orlando/Windermere
Posts: 3,774
I can tell you its pretty much going to be up to the DOT officer. You should have everything tied down period with a minimum of two straps. I have a CDL A and I have a few tickets for loose loads, Load dropping, and loading shifting. All are required court appearances. Any commercial vehicle should also enter the scale house too. Even if its a F150 pulling a lawn trailer. Now, they really don't enforce all of that regularly but it's how it's suppose to be.


http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regul.../cs-policy.htm
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-26-2013, 09:12 AM
Chilehead Chilehead is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Stockbridge, GA
Posts: 1,861
I think is comes down to common sense. An insecure load will cost you a ticket if caught by an officer. This happened to me. There is a large white oak tree that hovers above my driveway where I park my truck. One fall day, I depart to perform an errand. Halfway to my destination an officer pulls me over and writes me a ticket for an insecure load and a second one for wreckless endangerment: some of the leaves from the oak tree had fallen in the bed of my truck, and blew out onto his squad car/windshield. I wasn't even carrying a "load" per se, but the officer didn't see it that way. It cost me $400.00 in fines and a raging fury from the judge on how "tragic this situation could have been". IMHO, they were both doosh ba--ahem, I mean in the wrong.

Last edited by Chilehead; 11-26-2013 at 09:13 AM. Reason: typo
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-26-2013, 12:05 PM
BlazersandWildcats2009's Avatar
BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 191
Scott, appreciate that. Don't know why my computer was having problems opening that one. I'm reading up now!

Chilehead, I believe you are right about the common sense part. But I will give you my opinion on your story, I live in one THE fastest growing city in the nation, are cops are usually laid back, that is unless you run across the wrong one on a bored, slow day I'm sure. But I honestly feel bad for you, that story is pathetic. Here in Texas, it's an everyday occurrence to see 8-illegals piled in a Super-Duty pulling a bed and trailer full of brush with no tarps, covering, or anything. Now you leave the city, and hit the highway, I will tell you the DPS Troopers don't do no-joking around here. In my area if one gets you for your equipment, I would almost bet you it's going to be a trooper.

As far as mowers, everything is strapped, however are you guys strapping equipment thats racked on the rack with a pad lock x 2 straps?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-26-2013, 12:42 PM
BlazersandWildcats2009's Avatar
BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Houston
Posts: 191
Sorry about the question also, I was re-reading my post and I pretty much worded my question all wrong. I mentioned the mowers out of stupidity and not thinking, all my mowers will be strapped now, no questions asked. I'm not taking the risk, don't have that many lawns to where it would be a time burden on me anyway, but it would be a burden if one of my mowers hit someone else.

I meant to generalize my question around handhelds. Do you guys or is there a law stating that the handheld should be strapped, if they are in the rack with locks? I would be more interested in hearing the ideas and laws regarding this? Sorry about the wording and silly question.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.com™ - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:42 AM.

Page generated in 0.08858 seconds with 7 queries