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Old 01-08-2007, 10:39 PM
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stahlfaust stahlfaust is offline
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Location: Western NY
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Mountain Ash Problem

I have a client that wants me to save their mountain ash in their front yard. There is a lot of dead stuff in the tree, and the last couple visits I'm finding large branches coming off. This tree is their only privacy from a high traffic highway, if possible i would like to save. There are some good limbs, so i was wondering if a revival is possible.

Pictures:





I have no clue on what action to take. I think it has fireblight. So far I have taken off a couple limbs that pose danger.
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Old 01-10-2007, 04:42 PM
PSUturf PSUturf is offline
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It looks like it could be Botryosphaeria canker. How long did it take for the branch to die once it started to show symptoms of decline? Fireblight will usually kill a branch in a very short time. Fireblight cankers will have a sticky ooze coming from them. There is no treatment for either disease other than pruning out infected branches. Clean your pruning tools with alcohol after each cut to reduce the chance of spreading the disease. In the absence of rainfall water the trees. Drought stress will make a plant more susceptible to diseases. Evenly apply 10 gallons of water per inch of trunk diameter at ground level once a week. Do not wet the foliage or branches as this can cause the disease to spread faster.

Having said all that: Mt Ash are fairly short lived. If you can get 30 years from them that is pretty good. By the look of the tree in your photo I would say that is an old tree.
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Old 01-10-2007, 04:56 PM
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stahlfaust stahlfaust is offline
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Thanks. The only problem is that the spots in pictures 3 and 4 are at the base of the limbs. There are some buds on the tree, but not nearly as many as there should be. I told the client that Ill wait till spring, but I have a feeling this ones going to come down. Does this disease stay in the soil? Can it transfer to the apple tree in the back? I made sure I pruned in order to avoid contamination (apple, then Mt Ash). Could I plant a new one, or is the area contaminated? This street according to the homeowner has alot of these trees. This tree blocks the view of a very busy expressway.
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Old 01-11-2007, 03:53 PM
PSUturf PSUturf is offline
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I don't think either of these diseases is transferred through the soil. Fire blight in particular is often spread by bees when they are polinating the flowers. If it is fireblight and other trees in the neighborhood are showing the same symptoms then make sure it is replaced with a tree that is fireblight resistant. The key to preventing canker diseases or fire blight is to keep the tree healthy. Replacing it with an evergreen might be a good option since it would block the view of the busy expressway all year. Colorado spruce var Fat Albert or a black hills spruce are medium sized evergreens that would be a good substitute as far as mature size.
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