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  #11  
Old 09-16-2007, 09:50 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
If the leaves are as good as gone perhaps just let it go to sleep, as Kiril suggests. The K won't do any good once the leaves stop circulating nutrients, correct?
It won't do any good to promote new growth this late in the season. Mulch the root ball, let it go dormant, and see what happens in the spring.
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2007, 06:14 PM
Newt* Newt* is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
What would you recommend to boost the survival chances of a newly transplanted tree? It seems normal "dry back" of leaves but is there a quick K to revitalize it in any way?

The leaves have been drying, but haven't quite dropped yet. I have been spraying them to help out and I did soak in some ashes with the initial planting last Sunday.

I will find some high K fertilizer. Don't know how quickly ashes are usable by the tree.

If the leaves are as good as gone perhaps just let it go to sleep, as Kiril suggests. The K won't do any good once the leaves stop circulating nutrients, correct?
Thanks.
Unleached ashes are higher in K then leached. The problem is that ashes can change the pH of your soil to more alkaline. It's like adding lime. See the first chart here for K. You can use greensand or seaweed or kelp for high K.
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/c...ng_tables.html
http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/pri...dashprint.html

I agree with Krill. Make sure the tree is properly watered and mulched. Leaves are expendable to trees in times of stress. Once they are dried and brown they won't turn green again. I suspect the change to the sunnier conditions has caused leaf scorch. Kinda like sunburn on people. Maybe these will help.
http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/pla...ees/f1147w.htm
http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/mulching.aspx
http://cals.arizona.edu/pubs/water/az1298/
http://www.watersaver.org/pdfs/FALL_..._FOR_TREES.pdf

Newt
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  #13  
Old 09-16-2007, 06:17 PM
BostonBull BostonBull is offline
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The tree will still circulate nutrients up from the roots, but then it has no suply for the winter and may die then.

The leaves are unable to absorb water, bte can only release water vapor through the Stomata (pores). So spraying the leaves is futile.

Take some zoomed out pics and lets see the whole tree.
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2007, 09:22 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Thanks for all the input. The leaves are certainly done now so it is mulched and watered and ready for winter.
My thinking was to have the last bit of active growth supportting new root development, but now I wonder should I have transplanted later? It was a big project to do by hand and from shade to sun it is difficult to expect much.

Do trees store up enough food to grow roots after leaf fall and still have reserves for spring?
Thanks for the websites, it is clear I should brush up on some botany
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #15  
Old 09-18-2007, 01:03 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Don't worry about it, you will find out in the spring.
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  #16  
Old 09-26-2007, 12:41 PM
dishboy dishboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NattyLawn View Post
Who did the soil test?

IMO you don't need the lime, and should concentrate on building organic matter. I've seen too many university and ag extension tests that recommend too much lime for the pH. 6.3 to 6.7 is optimal. The gypsum will bring up your calcium and sulfur levels without affecting pH. It's a new lawn with low organic matter so be patient and give it some time.

Corn gluten next spring at 20-25lbs per thousand.


To much spring N , bad move!
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  #17  
Old 09-27-2007, 08:48 AM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
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[QUOTE=dishboy;1975875]To much spring N , bad move![/QUOTE

If it's too much spring N, what's the solution?
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