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  #11  
Old 10-20-2007, 07:55 PM
Newt* Newt* is offline
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Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 182
If a soil test is done the lab should tell how much of what to apply. Maybe this will be helpful.

http://www.extremelygreen.com/Produc...20Meal%203-2-2
Quote:
Alfalfa Meal 3-2-2

Description
Alfalfa meal is a made from alfalfa, a green manure crops containing small amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium.

How it works
Alfalfa contains the hormone, Triacontanol, a plant growth regulator. The primary boost comes from the millions of microbes in the fermented meal that activate the soil organisms that then convert nutrients into forms available to plants.

General usage
Suitable as a soil amendment for all kinds of plants, shrubs, and trees. Roses love it. Also great for revving up the compost pile by adding quick nitrogen to break down carbon-rich materials (leaves and so on).

Directions for use
Apply as a top dressing and water in or brew as a tea. Apply dry at 10 lbs per 1,000 sq. ft. Caution: If placed in the root zone, the rapid decomposition of alfalfa will generate heat which can damage roots.
http://www.extremelygreen.com/Produc...Name=Greensand
Quote:
Greensand

Description
A naturally-occurring iron-potassium silicate (also known as glauconite) with the consistency of sand but 10 times the moisture absorption.

How it works
For most part unexplainable. However, numerous trials show product is effective. One possible explanation is mineralization, which improves soil life by increasing populations of certain bacteria that slowly dissolve insoluble mineral nutrients.

General usage
An exceptional soil conditioner for pastures, forage fields, lawns, orchards, small fruits, vegetables, and greenhouse potting mixes.

Directions for use
As a soil conditioner, apply at 25 lbs per 1,000 sq.ft. To correct potassium deficiency, use soil test to determine rates and apply 20-100 lbs per 1,000 sq.ft., depending on extent of deficiency.
Scroll down here to 'Soil deficiency' and look under Potassium for what is recommended. Alfalfa meal is not recommended.
http://www.extremelygreen.com/fertilizerguide.cfm


This site says that New Jersey Greensand is 4% potassium.
http://www.greenhands.com/soil/potassium.html

Newt
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When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.
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  #12  
Old 10-22-2007, 11:05 AM
dishboy dishboy is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: zone 6
Posts: 3,346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newt* View Post
If a soil test is done the lab should tell how much of what to apply. Maybe this will be helpful.

http://www.extremelygreen.com/Produc...20Meal%203-2-2


http://www.extremelygreen.com/Produc...Name=Greensand


Scroll down here to 'Soil deficiency' and look under Potassium for what is recommended. Alfalfa meal is not recommended.
http://www.extremelygreen.com/fertilizerguide.cfm


This site says that New Jersey Greensand is 4% potassium.
http://www.greenhands.com/soil/potassium.html

Newt
Let's see, Greensand is 4% P, Alfalfa 2% P. Never seen greensand at the local feedmill, fertilizer wholesaler etc, although can't say I was looking for it either.

Alfalfa pellets are CHEAP @ about $6.00 per 50lb, I can buy down the street and if you have ever used would know what beautiful turf results from its use. You can try to get scientific about this whole thing but I have found by simply using Organics and a little forethought, leaving the clippings and using good cultural practices that nature takes care of the details. Frankly I could give a rats azz about your sites recommendation. Grass is really easy to grow , it really is.
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  #13  
Old 10-22-2007, 11:42 AM
Newt* Newt* is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Maryland zone 7
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by dishboy View Post
Frankly I could give a rats azz about your sites recommendation.
Dishboy, there is no need to be rude. Your opinion isn't what's important here, but helping to answer questions of folks who want to learn is. I was answering Greenjeans question and not addressing you. I always show links to sites where I get my info. I should have put his question in quotes so you wouldn't think my response was for you. Alfalfa also contains nitrogen which wasn't required for the OP, but you probably already know that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greenjeans_il View Post
Please be more specific; how much potassium is in alfalfa? How many bags of alfalfa will the other person need to effectively raise potassium levels in their soil? One bag will do the trick? Or several bags over a period of years?
Newt
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When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.
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  #14  
Old 10-23-2007, 06:18 PM
muddstopper's Avatar
muddstopper muddstopper is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: transition zone
Posts: 2,343
Depending on where you get your SOP, it is an acceptable source of organic K. Not all SOP is consiidered organic or is approved by OMRI
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  #15  
Old 10-24-2007, 01:34 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: District 9 CA
Posts: 18,318
I find in cases like these is is very helpful to determine why the deficiency is occurring if possible.

For example, if you determined that low K is due to your parent material, then perhaps greensand would be the better choice. Greensand is also used as a water filtration media, so you can usually find it at places that sell filtration media.

If you determine that it is a temporary deficiency due to management issues, then one of the other options may be more appropriate.

You can check your parent material here, assuming your not sitting on top of non-indigenous backfill.

http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov/a...oilSurvey.aspx
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