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  #11  
Old 03-31-2008, 09:23 AM
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TforTexas TforTexas is offline
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Location: Albuquerque NM
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Armyworms or Cutworms do not burrow into the soil and dig tunnels bringing excess dirt to the surface to cause mounds. They reside in the thatchy layer of the turf in silky tunnels. My guess is earthworms as well, and they have a lot of beneficial properties for the turf (except for the mounds). Perhaps just fertilizing would thicken the turf up, and a little drier weather pattern might make the mounds not such a nuisance.
Other "burrowers" might be mole crickets, I think someone mentioned an oriental beetle, I have also seen wasps burrow into dens and leave small mounds in some parts of the country.
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  #12  
Old 03-31-2008, 09:37 AM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TforTexas View Post
Armyworms or Cutworms do not burrow into the soil and dig tunnels bringing excess dirt to the surface to cause mounds. They reside in the thatchy layer of the turf in silky tunnels. My guess is earthworms as well, and they have a lot of beneficial properties for the turf (except for the mounds). Perhaps just fertilizing would thicken the turf up, and a little drier weather pattern might make the mounds not such a nuisance.
Other "burrowers" might be mole crickets, I think someone mentioned an oriental beetle, I have also seen wasps burrow into dens and leave small mounds in some parts of the country.
I was amazed to see the armyworms in the tunnels as well. They were as fat and thick as I've seen. Armyworm tunnels typically go down and along the surface, as GJB tunnels go straight down.

The wasps are interesting though for my area, especially in an area with cicadas and cicada killer wasps.
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  #13  
Old 03-31-2008, 09:55 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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My thoughts on the problem, if it is not killing the lawn, rake out the mounds and be done with it. Think of it as natural aeration.

Green June Bug

Earthworms
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  #14  
Old 03-31-2008, 10:08 AM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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cicada killer wasps.

I had never seen these until last year, I was walking the dog and heard the buzz of the cicada as it was falling to the ground with this huge, I thought it was a hornet, bee on its back. The wasp literally chewed its head off and ate it. It gave me chills thinking what if that sucker landed on me, OUCH !
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  #15  
Old 03-31-2008, 02:40 PM
NattyLawn NattyLawn is offline
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The females are the ones with stingers, but generally are viewed as beneficial insects. Males have been known to dive bomb around mating season.
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  #16  
Old 03-31-2008, 03:51 PM
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Keegan Keegan is offline
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those bees are harmless. I had an account that had them. I walked right through their area with no problems. There were dozens flying around me. They do look intimidating
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