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  #41  
Old 02-05-2002, 06:18 PM
motivated1 motivated1 is offline
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Join Date: May 2001
Location: McKinney Texas
Posts: 25
bad...really bad.

sure, 1/8" will work 1/16' will work for laterals. GO ahead put 4 or 6 heads on there. Make sure you have @ least 42 psi and you buy a 3/4' valve for every head installed, plus bushings,plus couplings. Hey....! why not make it a sub surface irrigation system then you could do it w/ 2 valves and still use your 1/8# or 1/16# C'mon people tel's be a little more sarcastic! 1/8 1/16 pipe! geeeeess! ...not to be the biggest...striving to be the Best! Matthew Mc Menamy T X L I # 8050
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  #42  
Old 02-20-2002, 02:19 PM
Ground Master Ground Master is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: colorado springs
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Where I'm at 99% of homes have a 5/8meter and 3/4service line. I use a 3/4 x 1 bull nose tee at the tap and run 1" everything rest of way. Max gpm of any zone is 12, like to stick to 10. This keeps pressure loss at a minumum and water velocity low---2 keys to a reliable system.
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  #43  
Old 03-12-2002, 07:48 PM
Silver Bullet Silver Bullet is offline
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Location: Iowa
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When you guys talk about psi, you talk like that is the only thing that matters, compared to volume. I am not writing this because I think that I know everything about the irrigation industry. I talked to a Hunter representative that told me a story about a system that was put in at an older house that had galvanized pipe that was half plugged because of corrosion. He said that they tested the pressure, and it had great pressure, but didn't have enough volume of water through the pipe to make the system work.
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  #44  
Old 03-13-2002, 02:21 AM
Planter Planter is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Silver Bullet
When you guys talk about psi, you talk like that is the only thing that matters, compared to volume. I am not writing this because I think that I know everything about the irrigation industry. I talked to a Hunter representative that told me a story about a system that was put in at an older house that had galvanized pipe that was half plugged because of corrosion. He said that they tested the pressure, and it had great pressure, but didn't have enough volume of water through the pipe to make the system work.
True story!!

Pressure and volume of flow are two of the main issues in setting up a good system.

K
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  #45  
Old 04-17-2002, 08:02 PM
Jayusl Jayusl is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Louisiana
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?

I'm curious to know why no one has mentioned elevation changes and there relivence to static pressure. Surely professionals with 50 years of combined experience have more important things to do besides trashing and humiliating site members with less "experience." I'm sure we all have seen companies who have been around for decades doing mediocre work. Spend less time talking and more time studying.
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  #46  
Old 04-18-2002, 07:32 AM
HBFOXJr HBFOXJr is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Southern New Jersey
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I'm curious to know why no one has mentioned elevation changes and there relivence to static pressure. Surely professionals with 50 years of combined experience have more important things to do besides trashing and humiliating site members with less "experience." I'm sure we all have seen companies who have been around for decades doing mediocre work. Spend less time talking and more time studying.

We haven't mentioned elevation differences and how it can affect static pressure, because in most cases it will not affect pipe sizing which is the topic of discussion here.

Static pressure differences due to elevation elevation would be dealt with as having too much pressure requiring regulation or not enough and requiring a booster pump.
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  #47  
Old 04-18-2002, 08:47 AM
Jayusl Jayusl is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Louisiana
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Mr. Fox,

I am not going to write a long explanation for your benefit, but for the benefit of the people posting to this board looking for information. You made an excellent point earlier in this thread when you recommended that anyone looking to install irrigation should take some sort of design training. I will take that one step further. Anyone who installs, designs, or REPAIRS irrigation should take some sort of training on basic hydraulics. Most major manufacturers sponsor one or two day classes at their facilities or at your local distributor. Your job will be considerably easier if you understand how predictable water "behaves."

Anyway the point I was trying to make with my earlier post was to try to get you guys to explain elevation loss. I promise I will get to that later but first lets step back for a minute. If I remember correctly the pressure at the POC was 110 psi. Lets think about where he got this number from. Assuming that he is referring to his static pressure readings, he probably landed on this number by checking the hose bib connected to the main on the side of the house with a threaded pressure gauge. Now we would have to consider a lot of different things before I would feel comfortable with designing the system around this 110 PSI reading. The pressure in the city water supply fluctuates at different times of the day because of public usage. You may get 110 Psi at 10:30 A.M. and then check again at 1:00 when everybody is flushing toilets in the city after lunch and you might get 85 Psi. Maybe your homeowner gets up and takes a shower at 5:00 A.M. while your system is running. My point is to determining an accurate static pressure figure you have to take several measurements at different times of the day and on different days of the week. Your local water purveyor can provide you with information on average city main line static pressure readings on the site. Only after all this info. is collected should you move on. Systems have to be designed using "worst case" figures to be able to keep up with the demand of high end landscapes year round.

I will stop here for now so I can back to work.
I will continue this post later
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  #48  
Old 04-21-2002, 12:05 AM
David Gretzmier David Gretzmier is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Fayetteville,AR
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sheesh -this is an amazing thread. having done this for about 10 years, heres what I know about pipe sizes in my area- 95 % of irrigation systems we fix or install run fine on 1" main, 1"- 3/4" laterals, and 4-5 rotors or 8 pops on each zone. period. you can grouse all day long about friction loss, volume, velocity, and all the yadda yadda, but the reality is this- most guys out there only check that stuff when pressure is below 45psi at the meter, or when making a long run. we use 1"mains and lats now for ease of install, and it covers 90% of installs we do. If pressure is over 90 psi, we regulate w/ adjustable in a box to adjust up/down in future if necessary.I have taken the classes and read the books and can quote stats like 5ft per sec. if you like. the sad reality is all folks don't know what the system is gonna do at 6 in the morning when everybody on the block starts taking a shower, or when they add 16 houses to the 2" main on the street you hooked up to 2 years ago. you build headroom in a system and don't max out anything in those graphs on pipe sizing in the rainbird and hunter manuals. I guarantee fox and all you guys made mistakes when you started out and don't throw stones at the guys who are trying to learn. help them. and be nice. Dave g
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  #49  
Old 04-24-2002, 04:26 AM
bayaa bayaa is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Concord California (bay area)
Posts: 43
Hey im the guy that started this post and I agree with the last guy. It seems that a lot of you guys are acting like your build a dam orrunning a nuclear power plant. Dam it was just a simple question but I did read the hunter book. I believe that you do need to know alot about pressure loss and inches per seconds in some cases. Have you ever though that the comanys pushes larger size pipe because it cost more but probaly cost them the same to make. Because I know I rather buy 3/4 parts than lager sizes when it comes to price.
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