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Old 03-11-2009, 09:59 AM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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ASLA reducing the use of grass

I thought they were talking about something else ???

The think its a plot started by Kiril LOL

Survey Shows LAís Replacing Grass To Reduce Maintenance Time, Utility Costs
According to a survey by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), shows landscape architects replacing grass to reduce maintenance time, utility costs and using food and vegetable gardens as green alternatives to traditional lawns.

Gardens for homegrown food have remained an integral part of American homesteads from the early pioneers to World War II Victory Gardens. However, a new survey shows that food gardens have reemerged as a new technique to increase the sustainability of a home. Nearly one in five (19.3%) residential landscape architects is replacing part or all of traditional grass lawns with food/vegetable gardens, according to a survey by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA).

http://www.landscapeonline.com/research/article/11772
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Old 03-11-2009, 10:03 AM
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DUSTYCEDAR DUSTYCEDAR is offline
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isnt that nice in my best david spade voice
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:11 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Finally ..... people are starting to realize the value in utilizing their land for something other than purely aesthetic appeal. Why landscape design moved away from this to begin with is something I will never quite understand.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:24 AM
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JDUtah JDUtah is offline
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Kiril,
My bro lives in so cal, and the semi annual visits have me noticing the increasing popularity of Astro Turf on a residential property. To you, what is better for a residence, grass or astro-turf (second to regional appropriate plants)?
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:38 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDUtah View Post
Kiril,
My bro lives in so cal, and the semi annual visits have me noticing the increasing popularity of Astro Turf on a residential property. To you, what is better for a residence, grass or astro-turf (second to regional appropriate plants)?
That depends .... in SoCal my choice would be astro if you really need "turf". In areas that can support turf with little or no supplemental water, then natural, but only as much as will be reasonably used.

When I discuss management strategies with clients, one of my first questions is do you really need the turf and can you live with something more appropriate for the region .... like native "no mow" mixes, native perennial mixes, veg/fruit/herb gardens, etc....

IMHO, you can get both aesthetic appeal and functional use (i.e. veggies/fruits/herbs) with intelligent design.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:51 AM
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JDUtah JDUtah is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
That depends .... in SoCal my choice would be astro if you really need "turf". In areas that can support turf with little or no supplemental water, then natural, but only as much as will be reasonably used.

When I discuss management strategies with clients, one of my first questions is do you really need the turf and can you live with something more appropriate for the region .... like native "no mow" mixes, native perennial mixes, veg/fruit/herb gardens, etc....

IMHO, you can get both aesthetic appeal and functional use (i.e. veggies/fruits/herbs) with intelligent design.
Makes sense to me. Any concerns about the environmental impact on surrounding areas by stopping the nutrient cycle?

I agree gardens are the way to go. I plan to put grape vines in as a privacy line this year (fruit trees already there to block the higher view). Disneyland used veggie plants aesthetically several years back (I haven't noticed it in a few years). It looked great and was pretty cool.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:55 PM
ICT Bill ICT Bill is offline
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Edible hedges are all the rage in the middle of the country
Blueberries are a favorite, they would work great in the Utah area, very hardy bunch blueberries. They can be trimmed like mad with little to no problems. They grow in the harshest of environments

Perennials, shrubs and trees are great for nutrient cycling or maybe I am not understanding what you are saying
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:42 PM
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JDUtah JDUtah is offline
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Bill,

Blueberries. MMMMM. Hmm, never seen a blackberry out here.

Sorry the nutrient cycling comments was relating to synthetic turf. In a sense the turf virtually eliminates addition of SOM and eventually the microbes would run out of food? I wonder if this significantly affects local ecosystems?
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