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Old 08-16-2009, 10:31 PM
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Flow Control Flow Control is offline
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Advice needed

My wife and I just purchased a home in SW Florida so we can get out of the cold during the winter.

My question: will Kichler products hold up in the environment. We are maybe 3 miles away from the Gulf. I plan on doing the Lighting in phases as I add onto the existing landscaping. The first phase will consist of 15 fixtures and I don't want to kick myself down the road for using the proper product for the conditions.
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Old 08-16-2009, 11:23 PM
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Lite4 Lite4 is offline
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NOOOO! Anything aluminum will be toast in a year or two that close to the ocean. Go with solid brass you will have much better luck.
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Old 08-17-2009, 08:24 AM
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Thanks, appreciate it.
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Old 08-17-2009, 09:13 AM
David Gretzmier David Gretzmier is offline
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Try to PM Chris J on here, he is a florida lighting guy that chimes in occaisionally. But I agree with Tim- Aluminum is essentially instant corrosion, just add florida. Solid brass is also my reccomendation.
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Old 08-17-2009, 06:09 PM
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Pro-Scapes Pro-Scapes is offline
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Some guys claim alluminum will last 10 yrs in coastal areas but from what I have seen and experienced they may hold up but not well at all. For just a little more you can get into a brass fixture which will hold up alot better especially in the long run.

Several landscape outfits are big alluminum vista and Kichler users here. I am over 50 miles inland and see fixtures corroded to the point you can not open them without persuding them with a hammer all the time. Most are in the 5 yr old range and it becomes even worse with a salt water pool area.
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Old 08-18-2009, 08:10 AM
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I appreciate all the advice and I will use brass fixtures.


Thanks again, you guys saved me some arse ache down the road.
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Old 08-18-2009, 12:05 PM
steveparrott steveparrott is online now
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Bronze (2% zinc) not Brass (40% zinc)

Consider solid bronze (2% zinc) - brass has a very high zinc content (35-40%) and is subject to dezincification (especially in salt-water environments), causing it to become brittle (stress cracking) and mottled (with reddish spots) in time.

From Copper.org (http://www.copper.org/resources/prop...e/brasses.html)

"Dezincification can be a problem in alloys containing more than 15% zinc in stagnant, acidic aqueous environments. Dezincification begins as the removal of zinc from the surface of the brass, leaving a relatively porous and weak layer of copper and copper oxide. The dezincification can progress through the brass and weaken the entire component. Stress corrosion cracking can also be a problem for brasses containing more than 15% zinc."

From Corrosion-doctors.org (http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/For...zinc-valve.htm)

"Dezincification selectively removes zinc from the alloy, leaving behind a porous, copper-rich structure that has little mechanical strength...During dezincification, the more active zinc is selectively removed from the brass, leaving behind a weak deposit of the porous, more noble copper-rich metal."

Pictures of dezincification in brass: http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/For...ive/dezinc.htm & http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/For...zinc-valve.htm.
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Old 08-18-2009, 12:55 PM
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Until someone can show us a Solid Brass Outdoor Lighting Fixture that has been damaged due to this so called dezincification I wouldnt stress on it too much.

The only pictures I see were those of irrigation valves which uses are much different and its exposure to water and minerals is much much greater. Unless the fixtures are underwater I dont see how this dezincification process should be anything to fear. And I am sure that this would take a lifetime to occur in an above ground landscape lighting product.
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Old 08-18-2009, 01:52 PM
David Gretzmier David Gretzmier is offline
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While I have seen aluminum corrosion here in Arkansas, bad corrosion even, I know it is ten times worse in coastal conditions. I have never seen brass corrosion, other than maybe a slight haze of greenish on a dark brown patina. Chris J would know more.
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