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  #31  
Old 08-31-2009, 07:33 PM
Alan B Alan B is offline
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NP.

ISO refers the "film" speed setting -- i.e. how much light is required to properly expose the "film". Low ISO's need more light but produce more vibrant colors and smoother pictures. High ISO (like 1000) don't need as much light (i.e. you can use faster shutter speeds) but are grainier and less vibrant.

For nice shots you'll probably get the best results around 100-200 ISO. Up at 500-1000 ISO the shutter won't have to be open as long but the pic will be grainier.

High ISO are typically used when you need to have a fast shutter speed (like taking an action shot) to prevent blur but still need the "film" to get exposed. Since we are using tripods, taking a still image (no movement in the photo), and have the time, a lower ISO (100-200) will give a beeter quality looking shot.

In short if you take 2 pictures with the same aperture but different ISO's, the higher ISO will have a faster shutter speed to achieve the same exposure (but be grainier) than the lower ISO.
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  #32  
Old 09-01-2009, 01:58 AM
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pihta pihta is offline
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I also found that picture you see on the screen after shot is darker than when you see it on the computer monitor. May be it just my camera model issue, dont know.
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  #33  
Old 09-01-2009, 09:40 AM
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trailboss trailboss is offline
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Wow! What a wealth of information. I'm sure that I will have to refer back to this post a few times to soak up some of this info.

I thought that I had my mind made up on the D60 but now I'm thinking that I might check out the new D3000. I think that they are about the same camera - but I want to check them out side by side.

Thanks again for all of the information.

Steve
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  #34  
Old 09-01-2009, 03:44 PM
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cgaengineer cgaengineer is offline
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I am a Nikon guy so I would steer you towards that. This being said both Canon and Nikon make great cameras.

Take a look at a D200, its a couple years old but if you can find a used one with little use you would have a great camera...10mp is a ton of pixels too.

I have the D200 and D80 and I love both of them...I also have several lenses from wide all the way up to 500mm.

If you buy new I would suggest getting a full frame and buying full frame lenses instead of a DX camera and DX only lenses. Full frame will still use most DX lenses, but your image will be cropped...not a problem if your camera is 24mp though.
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