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Old 12-17-2009, 06:30 PM
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g21 g21 is offline
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Anyone Use SweetPeet?

Hey Guys,
I am thinking about using SweetPeet this upcoming season instead of hardwood mulch in the beds on our properties. I'd like to know if anyone has any input as to well it works and if it's worth the extra money.
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Old 12-17-2009, 06:40 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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I can't see it being worth the extra cost..at least in my area when mulch is well under 20 bucks. It dries out very quickly so if your looking for somewhat of an insulator...you would have to lay it really thick....like too thick.
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Old 12-17-2009, 06:50 PM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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My experiance is by no means scientific or controlled, so if you were looking to use it as a fert or to someway reduce the hardwoods tendency to use up N...I couldnt say. I do however think that there is value in the texture of Hardwood that SP does not have.
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Old 12-18-2009, 09:10 AM
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g21 g21 is offline
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I was thinking more for the flower beds since it has a finer texture and is easier to spread. It will have the appearance of dirt while hopefully keeping the weeds down. I never really liked using mulch in flower beds.
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Old 12-18-2009, 09:21 AM
mdlwn1 mdlwn1 is offline
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I can't comment on the SweetPeat specificly, but I can say without question that using compost in flower beds as opposed to mulch can dramaticly reduce and even eliminate the need for fungicide and insect control. I was trained using mulch (begonias, impatients, petunias, etc) and supplimenting with a mix of 3336g (cleary's) and an insect control...no doubt perfect results. Then I spent a year at Brickman. They religiously till an inch or so of compost into their flower beds every season. The results were flowers that could fend off most fungus and would only be susceptable when conditions were really bad over a prolonged period (wave petunias). Begonias wouldnt get anything..at all! Even the late season insect damage on Marigolds and Petunias was minor. I also noticed they were considerably more drought tolerant as well.
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:52 AM
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Thanks. That's a big help!
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