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  #61  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:14 AM
joes169 joes169 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampy View Post


What is being discussed here is residential flatwork, not highways & bridges. As I stated earlier, I've never seen a piece of residential concrete flatwork fail when the concrete & steel was placed properly.

So what your telling, in a residential setting, that a home with a 80yr old lady using a walker and as were the family using salt in enormous amounts to control icing problems will not deterate your flatwork over time? My snow/ice control comes from commerical side of things, at one medical facitily alone I've spread close to 22tons of salt this season, so maybe I do not follow you

Yes, I think that must be it. I know the effects that the additional freeze/thaw cycles can have on concrete. Sure, they can attribute to pre-mature failure of the concrete's SURFACE, but AGAIN, I've never seen a resi peice of concrete fail due to the corrosion of the steel when it was placed properly. If you're spreading all this salt at this medical facility and actually believe there is a rampant epidemic of steel corrosion due to de-icer's I'd imagine you have a disclaimer in your contract with the property owner dissolving yourself of all liability to steel reinforcement damage..............Of course you don't no one does, BECAUSE IT'S NOT A WELL DOCUMENTED PROBLEM AWAY FROM A FEW MINUTE PUBLIC STRUCTURES......


Well it doesn't get any better in spring as you said that "any heave will return",

So, you really think that the highway's heaving and not coming back down? Do they eventually raise the overpasses, street signs, adjacent asphalt roads, etc.... too or do you just have a step to get on to the concrete highway?? The clearance issue for semi's to navigate under bridges must really be tough...........



What is the weight limit on the road? Does your municpality have a restriction such as sussex where no traffic over 10 tons is allowed?
...................
80,000 pounds, unless you have an overweight permit. Again, it's a state numbered highway.
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  #62  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:29 AM
Joe Cement Joe Cement is offline
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I have a simple ? Here for everybody that's talking bout concrete failing due to corrision of reinforcement. Have you guys ever done demolition of reinforced slabs street curbs or even simple driveways. If your going to say yes. Think of this. When you were pulling your curbs apart or flatwork and lifting it up with let's say an excavator. I bet u had to torch or cut into sections bc what was holding it all together after u broke it. The REINFORCEMENT. So if the reinforcement fails like some are arguing why are we cutting it. It sounds like the steel should just be all broking now. Some people seem to look at this topic like we are building a high rise. The rebar when I demo looks beauiful. If I could salvage it I would save it and use it on my own home. Just think about what I said here and maybe people will realize something.
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  #63  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:50 AM
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STL Ponds and Waterfalls STL Ponds and Waterfalls is offline
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This is a Ford vs Chevy thread! Some believe in concrete and some don't. I hate concrete but I'll still pour a drive or a patio if the budget is to low for pavers. Concrete is quick cash and has it's place, but it has to many variables that I just can't deal with. I did concrete for 3 years and it is one of those things that just gets under my skin when you get a hot load or the finishers are hung over and moving like a turtle etc etc. As agreed there are pros and cons to both sides, but I'm a Ford man.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:35 PM
Branching Out Branching Out is offline
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Originally Posted by Joe Cement View Post
I don't know what kind of work you are doing but seems like you know about getting sued. Fortunately if you have any idea about concrete you will know you can't keep it from cracking. As far as lawsuits go never happened. You can't please everyone. If your in business to make money and your going to tell me every customer of yours was always 100 percent satisfied you must not be making $
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Really Dude? Are you kidding?
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  #65  
Old 02-12-2011, 03:42 PM
Branching Out Branching Out is offline
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Originally Posted by Joe Cement View Post
Iam new to this forum but not to the industry. I don't understand why most of you guys are against concrete for your base. Everyone I know here in NY pour 4" base with wire or fiber and we have no problems.
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What do you do when it heaves....because it will
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  #66  
Old 02-12-2011, 03:57 PM
Joe Cement Joe Cement is offline
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Really Dude? Are you kidding?
Kidding with what. Iam a mason contractor not a comedian
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  #67  
Old 02-12-2011, 04:01 PM
Joe Cement Joe Cement is offline
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What do you do when it heaves....because it will
Well iam second generation in this and either me who have been on my own for 10 years now has not had a problem or my father who's got over 30 years in. I'm not really understanding you. I think maybe you are a landscaper who got into hardscaping and you might not understand some things.
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  #68  
Old 02-12-2011, 06:17 PM
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DVS Hardscaper DVS Hardscaper is offline
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The ground will infact heave where winter is present. Anything on the ground's surface will move. It all may float peacefully. Or it may crack from the heaving. Unless you have frost footers, piers, etc - she's gonna move.

In terms of dry set pavers bedded in sand over concrete.....the heaving most likey wont harm anything.

Rebar and proper use of wire is everything.

Multi-level parking decks are built entirely of concrete and rebar.

In europe most buildings are constructed entirely of concrete and rebar.

But......this does not mean starting next week all my jobs will be placed on a concrete slab. Aggregate bases have their place.

And concrete slabs really are supposed to be installed over an aggregate base. So by the time you install the base for a concrete slab, then pour concrete, you're doing twice the work.



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