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Old 03-15-2011, 12:32 PM
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Niagara Falls Niagara Falls is offline
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New water

I am going to be enlarging my pond and will have to remove the fish while I do this because I will be replacing the line.
Once I have my pond ready for the fish, how long should I wait before introducing them to the new pond. I will be filling it with regular city tap water.
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:36 PM
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STL Ponds and Waterfalls STL Ponds and Waterfalls is offline
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Treat your pond with dechlorinator and you can put your fish back while filling the pond.
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Old 03-16-2011, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niagara Falls View Post
I am going to be enlarging my pond and will have to remove the fish while I do this because I will be replacing the line.
Once I have my pond ready for the fish, how long should I wait before introducing them to the new pond. I will be filling it with regular city tap water.
Glad to see you survived winter hibernation.

What are you going to use to house the fish during the enlargement process and what will be its capacity in gallons?

In either stage of the transfer process, whether from the old pond to holding or from holding to new pond, you want to ideally have the same pH and temperature in both facilities. This may not be a realistic possibility, but you want the differences to be a small as possible so as not to add to an already stressful transfer.

Where possible, use as much of the water in the holding facility as possible in the new pond. This will help to moderate any differences in water quality and chemistry.

And, as Keith mentioned, use Dechlor.
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Old 04-02-2011, 08:24 AM
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Niagara Falls Niagara Falls is offline
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Hey tadpole,

Yes, I survived the winter and I think that it's finally over. Today is the start of warmer day temps, but still below freezing at night until mid April.

The size of the container is not yet decided...that will be determined by what I can find in the local Home Depot etc.

I plan to use only the water from the pond for the container, but when I fill the pond again, it will be city water. A friend works for the city water department and I plan to ask him to help me with the de-chlorination and ph levels.....hopefully he will be available.

As to the temperatures, I will be running the new pond for a day or two to ensure there is no water loss before putting the fish back in, so I expect that both bodies of water will be the same temp.

While the fish are in the container, should I be aerating the water? And should I be doing the same with the pond now that the temperatures are rising?
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:44 AM
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While the fish are in the container, should I be aerating the water? And should I be doing the same with the pond now that the temperatures are rising?
The temporary home for the fish should be as large as possible. Not only should this be aerated, but bio-filtration MUST be provided. Aeration for the pond is not required.
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Old 05-15-2011, 10:07 PM
ToroZTR ToroZTR is offline
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U can take a look at stock tanks at tractor supply they make em 150 gallons plus. Aeration is critical in the temp. tank as well as some sort of filtration. Dechlorinator and a good set of water parameters will tell you when to put the fish back in. You need the fish to start the nitrate cycle of your filter and some microbe beneficial bacteria additive would help. When your done with the stock tank you could make a DIY filter out of it they work really well you can find instructions for it at thepondforum.com
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:12 AM
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STL Ponds and Waterfalls STL Ponds and Waterfalls is offline
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U can take a look at stock tanks at tractor supply they make em 150 gallons plus. Aeration is critical in the temp. tank as well as some sort of filtration. Dechlorinator and a good set of water parameters will tell you when to put the fish back in. You need the fish to start the nitrate cycle of your filter and some microbe beneficial bacteria additive would help. When your done with the stock tank you could make a DIY filter out of it they work really well you can find instructions for it at thepondforum.com
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Just keep it for future cleanouts.
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:52 AM
ToroZTR ToroZTR is offline
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You could do the above also but they do make really good inexspensive filter that is biological and mechanical all in one a 55 gallon barrel will handle 1500 gallons per barrel with a moderately stocked pond
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Old 05-16-2011, 12:25 PM
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Let me preface this post by saying that I have nothing against DIY. I think that we all are to a certain extent and, without this type of innovation, the world would progress at a much slower rate.

Most, but certainly not all, of the commercially available products in the Waterscaping industry are the result of the efforts of a DIY at some point in time.

My problem is with the aesthetics of many DIY projects. Horse troughs, 55 gallon drums etc. were not designed to have any cosmetic value, but for utility.
Certainly they can be adapted, in Water Features, to other than their original intended use, but I question their ultimate efficiency and ease of maintenance. I am also not convinced of any real savings in cost---long term.
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Old 05-16-2011, 08:06 PM
ToroZTR ToroZTR is offline
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The aesthetics could be solved easily by hiding it. I use mine to feed my waterfall weir. Others just have it as the spillway for their falls. Some people remote mount it and build little sheds around it. My filter has cost me less than 100 dollars. As far as efficiency goes there are very many people over at the pond forum who have 4000 gallon plus ponds that use this setup and there water is crystal clear see to the bottom clean. To clean my filter I pull two bags full of irrigation tubing out hit the bottom drain on the filter. Pull the two pieces of matala mat out clean it all in pond water and put it back in. I do this every three weeks and twice a week I hit the bottom drain. I never have to replace the matting or irrigation tubing and the filter can handle 4300 gph flow with a 2 inch outlet. I have nothing against store bought products and I respect everyones opinions I just like the diy aspect of it. That's just me thank you for respecting and understanding the DIY portion of ponding
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