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  #1  
Old 08-01-2011, 06:12 PM
OrganicsMaine OrganicsMaine is offline
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Location: Yarmouth Maine
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Where do you get your seed from???

Hi everyone,

Hope your seasons are going well. Been a bit crazy here for me....lots of work and some personal things to manage, but its all good! I am looking into a few sources for seed this for the overseeding season. I am going to be using a TTTF blend primarily for my sunny areas, and a standard shade mix for the darker spots.

In the past I have used Lesco and a few other local suppliers, and can easily use them again. However, I am looking hard at a few different TTTF blends with rhizome producing varieties like defiant xre.

What do you all think?
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  #2  
Old 08-01-2011, 06:42 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrganicsMaine View Post
Hi everyone,

Hope your seasons are going well. Been a bit crazy here for me....lots of work and some personal things to manage, but its all good! I am looking into a few sources for seed this for the overseeding season. I am going to be using a TTTF blend primarily for my sunny areas, and a standard shade mix for the darker spots.

In the past I have used Lesco and a few other local suppliers, and can easily use them again. However, I am looking hard at a few different TTTF blends with rhizome producing varieties like defiant xre.

What do you all think?
I think the RTTTF is is 99% marketing and 1% an outright delusion. If you want rhizomes, use KBG.
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  #3  
Old 08-01-2011, 07:07 PM
OrganicsMaine OrganicsMaine is offline
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Do you have any experience with this grass? I have been using a mix of TTTF and KBG, but want to slowly work the lawns towards more TTTF.
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  #4  
Old 08-01-2011, 07:26 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrganicsMaine View Post
Do you have any experience with this grass? I have been using a mix of TTTF and KBG, but want to slowly work the lawns towards more TTTF.
I have a lot of experience with TTTF, but my experience with RTTTF is limited to the university studies, which poo poo it from the rhizomic standpoint. If I may ask, since you are not in a transition zone, why on earth would you want to go to TTTF? You could probably do well with p. ryegrass in Maine, to say nothing of KBG. The alleged benefits of TTTF arguably outweigh its many deficiencies in the transition zone, but not elsewhere IMO, unless you like brown patch and damping out. It's clumpy, coarse, lacks upright growth habit, is not all that green, and is about 1% as rhizomic as KBG under the best of circumstances.
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:05 PM
OrganicsMaine OrganicsMaine is offline
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I like its durability and drought tolerance. The few lawns that I have seeded with it have done very well on both of those points. It also has a nice deep green color. The rye up here struggles in years when we have a light snow cover coupled with very cold temps....lots of winter kill.

The KBG is great, however, in trying to put together an organic program for customers, the high N needs of it aren't ideal. I will probably mix the RTTTF with a blue grass.

Where I am in Maine, we are zone 5a, so we still get some pretty hot temps here....101 last week actually. But usually, we are in the mid 70's to low 80's for much of July and into mid August. Then we begin to dip to the low to mid 70's.
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:30 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrganicsMaine View Post
I like its durability and drought tolerance. The few lawns that I have seeded with it have done very well on both of those points. It also has a nice deep green color. The rye up here struggles in years when we have a light snow cover coupled with very cold temps....lots of winter kill.

The KBG is great, however, in trying to put together an organic program for customers, the high N needs of it aren't ideal. I will probably mix the RTTTF with a blue grass.

Where I am in Maine, we are zone 5a, so we still get some pretty hot temps here....101 last week actually. But usually, we are in the mid 70's to low 80's for much of July and into mid August. Then we begin to dip to the low to mid 70's.
How I envy your climate... At the risk of repeating myself, RTTF is BS. This from Ohio State:

Quote:
Lateral Spread into Voids. .. The average number of daughter plants emerging in voids in tall fescue plots was less than 2 on both evaluation dates. The greatest distance from the circle’s edge that a Kentucky bluegrass daughter plant emerged was about 8 cm. Tall fescue daughter plants emerged no greater than 1.5 cm from the circle’s edge. In summary, rhizomatous tall fescue cultivars and blends did not increase rate of coverage relative to non-rhizomatous types.
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  #7  
Old 08-01-2011, 09:37 PM
OrganicsMaine OrganicsMaine is offline
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Ok, TTTF with KBG, I'll stick with whats working!

It is comforting to know that I can safely seed into mid May as long as the property is irrigated. However, don't forget that the perennial rye doesn't do so well due to some pretty damn cold temps in the winter! I am usually jealous of you all in February March and April!
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  #8  
Old 08-01-2011, 10:12 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Perennial Rye, red Creeping Fescue, Chewings Fescue and KBG all survive Wisco winters with o without snow... Never heard of TTTF until the Wisconsin Gardener said it would not survive in the Colder regions of Wisco...

If you can grow TTTF then Perennial Rye has a cakewalk...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #9  
Old 08-01-2011, 10:20 PM
maynardGkeynes maynardGkeynes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
Perennial Rye, red Creeping Fescue, Chewings Fescue and KBG all survive Wisco winters with o without snow... Never heard of TTTF until the Wisconsin Gardener said it would not survive in the Colder regions of Wisco...

If you can grow TTTF then Perennial Rye has a cakewalk...
And as far as I am concerned, if I could grow perennial rye I would never look at any other type. With all due respect to KBG, it doesn't get and better on bare feet than a great stand of PR. Plus, the stripes....
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  #10  
Old 08-16-2011, 09:18 AM
JWTurfguy JWTurfguy is offline
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Nice quote from Ohio State.

I personally haven't seen anything great from RTF either. What little bit of rhizoming that you might get isn't worth the brown patch that comes with it....
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