Register free!

The Green Industry's Resource Center



Reply
 
Thread Tools   Display Modes
  #41  
Old 11-30-2011, 07:06 PM
ksss's Avatar
ksss ksss is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Rigby, Idaho
Posts: 6,997
Dont try and start this business and live off the money for a while. I also live in a mostly Ag based area, you need the ability to do backhoe/mini ex type work and the grading/leveling type work. You will starve with only a skid steer. I have always had a lot of specialized skid steer attachments, its critical. Everyone has a skid steer these days, but they dont all have Preparators, concrete breakers, laser graders, trenchers and so on. Thats really where the money is. Sell the job not the machine (learned that one in the mid 90's when I first started). You might consider a compact loader backhoe instead of a skid steer. Its a long tough road and I don't envy you. I built a niche in which one did not exist. I have had to continue to evolve to stay alive. What works one year may not the next. If guys see you making money doing something, they will be in your market with a lower price as soon as possible. Thats why sometimes getting into niche areas that take a lot of capital like laser grading are great, because not everyone can afford to follow you. The likelyhood that you will succeed is not good. Most don't. You can do it but it will take money, desire, and the forsight to continually look for the next big area to jump into. You stay in one area and you will die where you stand.

Good luck.
__________________
See us at www.kaiserskidsteer.com

Proudly running CASE and Takeuchi equipment.
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 11-30-2011, 07:09 PM
Cat_246B Cat_246B is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Beaver, UT
Posts: 50
I was wondering what you think of brush cutting, can it be done with standard flow hydraulics. And do you think putting up flyers would be a good idea to get the word out to people. Can you please give me some more advice on what I should do, because I would really appreciate it. I am hoping to get a trailer this winter, and I was wondering what size I need to get, it will have to be able to hold a cat 246, or komatsu pc35MR mini excavator. I hope I haven't offended any one, sorry I didn't mean to. I look forward to any more help you can give me.
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 11-30-2011, 07:26 PM
Cat_246B Cat_246B is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Beaver, UT
Posts: 50
Just saw your post Ksss after I put my post on. Thanks for all of the information. I have the desire to do it, and I won't be starting until next spring or summer so it gives me time to save money so I can get started. I looked around town and I am the only person that would be doing something like this, and that would probably change in the future. I'll been working at are local green houses, and they have a backhoe that I can use, or an old backhoe attachment that I hope to buy from them. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 11-30-2011, 08:57 PM
bobcat_ron's Avatar
bobcat_ron bobcat_ron is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia
Posts: 9,952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat_246B View Post
I was wondering what you think of brush cutting, can it be done with standard flow hydraulics. And do you think putting up flyers would be a good idea to get the word out to people. Can you please give me some more advice on what I should do, because I would really appreciate it. I am hoping to get a trailer this winter, and I was wondering what size I need to get, it will have to be able to hold a cat 246, or komatsu pc35MR mini excavator. I hope I haven't offended any one, sorry I didn't mean to. I look forward to any more help you can give me.
It can be done on a standard flow skid steer, done it myself a few times:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LNojJuqTgY
__________________
The amount of energy necessary to refute bullsh*t is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it


http://www.youtube.com/user/69rd96
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 12-01-2011, 12:08 AM
david bailey david bailey is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: raleigh nc
Posts: 145
Where is Beaver?
The kinds of work that you may be able to do depends on where you live. You implied you would save up over the winter to get started in the spring/summer but if you live in an area where you get snow,then you may have opportunities to generate revenue this winter. Tell us a little more about where you live and the climate. You mention you live in a farming area. You might could do barn cleaning or hauling away horse poop which you could turn into good compost to resell.

I myself work a niche market real strong. I avoid the typical things some guys do(I may do them if asked but I don't go looking)and i have all of the equipment I need to do them. I capitalize on others stupidity and laziness to get business. Here's an example of one of the things I do. I have several commerical properties where I empty the trash cans and pick up the perimiter trash. generally I charge $30 a visit(I provide the trash bags) and I hit each property 2 to 3 times per week. At the end of the month I get about $600 for about 7 hrs worth of my time. It paid for my 350 and a dump trailer. I use those to haul off larger items that get illegally dumped like washing machines,pallets,crap and the prop. manager pays me extra for that. I use the trailer for mulch deliveries(7ton dump trailer BTW)or other things. You'll see guys all trying to mow the grass but can't patch a pothole or clean out a building or yard. They can't spread brine or ice melt or clean up a damaged tree. or blow leaves en masse.

tell me more about yr area and maybe I can give you some ideas on how to generate some business. In my business,the flyer idea didn't work and I'm not in the phone book. I have about 6 clients I do a lot of work for and others I do some for. I don't have employees but I can find help when I need it. I easily gross ove a 100k for the last 5 yrs and could probably do a lot more if I haveway tried just doing work no one will do.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 12-01-2011, 01:40 AM
Scag48's Avatar
Scag48 Scag48 is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 6,061
I would work for someone for a while and learn every trick of the trade before going on my own. Being damn good at what you do sells jobs and that's where your focus should be. At this point, as someone who has limited experience, low price is the only way you can compete with guys who already have a solid reputation and are fighting for the same work. So you have to ask yourself; what can you offer that the other guys can't?

Versatility keeps you busy as a business owner and as an employee. The more you can do, the better. The battle is exactly the same on the employee side of things, we're all fighting for the same jobs so whoever is most versatile typically gets the nod.
__________________

Go hard, go fast, or go home
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 12-01-2011, 06:27 PM
Cat_246B Cat_246B is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Beaver, UT
Posts: 50
I tried to get on with the construction company's in town, no luck, but I do have friends I go and help when they need me. I tried to post this last night, but my computer didn't work. I live in the wonderful state of Utah, my town is about 200 miles south of salt lake city. About 2,200-2,500 people live here. We are just entering winter, had are first snow storm in a month and a half. When it starts snowing it doesn't stop until late March, early April. Some storms bring up to a foot of snow at a time. All of the stores but one have somebody plow their parking lots, so I am hoping I can plow theirs.

In the summer time the farmers want their stack yards cleaned, so they can stack their new crop of hay in it. There are many lots that are never cut that are buy our main street. Three of them are about 7-10 acres, and the grass and weeds get to about 3 feet tall and is very ugly. We also have a city wide clean up day when people take out trash( big tree limbs fence posts, ect) so the city workers can pick it up. There are a lot of houses that have bad concrete side walks and drive ways. It's so bad that you can see the sand that was put under the concrete. I do have experience in setting the forms, and everything else that goes along with pouring cement. Our city had a company come and put new water lines in. They had to dig in peoples yards, and after they were done, they just back filled the tench and didn't replace the grass with sod or seeds. So people have big brown lines in their yards. People also get a lot of wood chips or gravel and then have nothing to move it with.

In the fall people want their leaves and apples taken off their yards. Most of the people have about 4-5 trees in there yard. My neighbor let me use his dump truck to get the leaves off are yard and it took about 4 loads( he has low sideboards on his truck.)

If there is anything else, like what else I experience in, just ask. Or if you have any ideas that I could use tell me.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 12-01-2011, 07:53 PM
muddywater muddywater is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,813
Are you in a situation where you can move to a more populated area with good demographics? 2200 sounds horrible. My town is 200,000 and I wish it was much bigger.
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 12-01-2011, 08:28 PM
Cat_246B Cat_246B is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Beaver, UT
Posts: 50
Nope. I know 2,200 is pretty bad, actually it sucks. I just looked it up it is actually about 3,000 or a little over, better but not by much. If you add the town that 20 min. away it's about 4,000. No one else does something like this, I know it doesn't make any sense, but I have heard some people talking about how someone should do something like this. So I thought, whats the hurt in trying, and I might get lucky and it does work...........I hope. That's why I would try to get my hands on any gob that I can, sort of, a jack of all trades if you will. Unless something comes up that a lot of people want done. And I just remembered that the people I work for ( Beaver Nursery) has a skid steer grader attachment., it's not a laser on though. After I go to college and get my Construction Management degree, I might move to one of the BIGGER cities. Would you guys have any sort of ideas about what I would be able to to in this small of a town?
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 12-02-2011, 07:39 PM
Cat_246B Cat_246B is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Beaver, UT
Posts: 50
Thank you all for the information. I guess I'll keep you informed about how it's turning out for me, and if I have any questions I know where to come. I also like how everyone gives information willingly to each other, and posts pictures of jobs they have done. I hope I'll be able to post and be welcome here for many years to come.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:26 AM.

Page generated in 0.07914 seconds with 9 queries