Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-25-2011, 09:26 AM
guitarman2420 guitarman2420 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 238
Should I charge extra for extra mowings due to warm weather?

90% of my maintenance business is covered by year around contracts which specifically state that mowing will be done "through the growing season", which I define in the agreement as mid-October or early November and I price the agreements at 30 cuts. The problem is that due to unseasonably warm weather in the Mid-Atlantic, I still have clients wanting us to mow the week before Christmas. Do any of you charge extra for mowing out of season? I have laid off my off season help and put most of the mowing equipment away. My agreements are priced for 30 or maybe up to 32 mowings, not 34-36, which is where we are at now. Are any of you running into this issue?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-25-2011, 10:18 AM
KrayzKajun's Avatar
KrayzKajun KrayzKajun is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Harvey,LA
Posts: 10,312
Simple! If they want it cut, they pay for it.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-25-2011, 10:20 AM
Swampy's Avatar
Swampy Swampy is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hartland, WI
Posts: 1,436
Go for it if you can, as a out of contract mowings. I'd call the customers first and see if they even want it, because the way you worded it, your techincally out of season but in actuallity your not.

I would have add something along the lines in the contract/agreement that any mowings over ## is a subject to a out of season charge of ## if elected by the home owner to continue mowing. This desicion must be submitted by MM/DD of the year of YYYY.
__________________
Landscape Engineering Service
US Army 372nd EN Co 12N

Picture Thread: http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.p...ight=army+pics
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-25-2011, 10:39 AM
guitarman2420 guitarman2420 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampy View Post
Go for it if you can, as a out of contract mowings. I'd call the customers first and see if they even want it, because the way you worded it, your techincally out of season but in actuallity your not.
I think that's a great point. I don't want to lose key clients over this; but on the other hand, I can give them a chance to do the "right thing". I think most of them will agree to the charge. I was curious to see if I was off base, or if others would ask for the extra fees too.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-25-2011, 03:31 PM
Dr.NewEarth Dr.NewEarth is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver Canada
Posts: 1,406
If they have asked you to do work over and above what was contracted then they should be paying extra for it.

You should also add this point to your contract for next season.

Send an invoice and write on it, "contingent lawn cutting out of season"

Don't take a loss or get pushed around by your clients.

You can bend over backwards all you want and do all sorts of freebies and favors that you think will make the client happy and keep a contract longer. All it does is cost your business money. Please don't work for free. You're not a volunteer.

The truth is, your client isn't going to work for free.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-25-2011, 03:51 PM
seabee24 seabee24 is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 619
I'll say this much. 3 years ago, I picked up a 30k plus account for snow because the old contractor tried charging them 700 for a storm that was 9 days late after the contract end date. They felt it was really unfair, and that when they signed a contract it was to cover a full season of work. Since that point, they dropped him, and I have had both snow and mowing for the past 3 years
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-25-2011, 04:13 PM
djagusch djagusch is offline
LawnSite Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: MN
Posts: 3,440
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarman2420 View Post
90% of my maintenance business is covered by year around contracts which specifically state that mowing will be done "through the growing season", which I define in the agreement as mid-October or early November and I price the agreements at 30 cuts. The problem is that due to unseasonably warm weather in the Mid-Atlantic, I still have clients wanting us to mow the week before Christmas. Do any of you charge extra for mowing out of season? I have laid off my off season help and put most of the mowing equipment away. My agreements are priced for 30 or maybe up to 32 mowings, not 34-36, which is where we are at now. Are any of you running into this issue?
You can if you like but beware of the possible fallout.

I would ask yourself how many times in the past years have you had below the average amount of cuts. Then ask if a added cut or two will kill the bank.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-25-2011, 04:17 PM
Dr.NewEarth Dr.NewEarth is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Vancouver Canada
Posts: 1,406
Quote:
Originally Posted by seabee24 View Post
I'll say this much. 3 years ago, I picked up a 30k plus account for snow because the old contractor tried charging them 700 for a storm that was 9 days late after the contract end date. They felt it was really unfair, and that when they signed a contract it was to cover a full season of work. Since that point, they dropped him, and I have had both snow and mowing for the past 3 years
Posted via Mobile Device

This just shows me that some clients don't care about us.

If the last guy had a contract that defined his start date and stop date for snow clean-up, then any-thing outside of that would be considered contingent pay.

He would require another agreement to do the extra work or there should be mention of the payment procedures in his standard contract, for contingent service. This was outside of the parameters of his normal service agreement.

Now, it looks like he went on his own and cleaned the parking lot without being called in to do the work -post contract? Is that what you are saying?

If so I'll bet he did this thinking he was doing it as a favor to the client, but ya...he wanted to get paid for his work. That's how the guy feeds his family.

The previous contractor did extra work outside of the scope of the normal agreement and it appears he got burned by another unscrupulous property manager. They look after themselves formost.

The client in my opinion took advantage of the contractor.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-25-2011, 07:39 PM
guitarman2420 guitarman2420 is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Midlothian, VA
Posts: 238
I think it's always a case of weighing out the alternatives. Let's face it, all of us have a client or two that we turn our heads the other way when they ask us for extras because they have taken care of us at other times. It's the client that is always taking and taking that causes me to want to play it "by the book" on their agreement.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:01 PM.

Page generated in 0.11220 seconds with 10 queries