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  #21  
Old 12-31-2011, 07:56 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkintheGarden View Post
Smallaxe, I think that the fertilizer-rapid growth-infestation scenario is only when over-fertilizing. Like over-mulching these things are done to make a buck.
I agree that most perennials do well on good mulch alone, but some perform much better with small, timely applications of the right type of fertilizer.

My experience confirmed my education that when it comes to both fertilizer and mulch a little goes a long way. I have and continue to try different things. In general it is prudent practice to apply half of the manufacturers reccomended application for most uses. When I want to produce traffic stopping displays of flowers, I use the full recommended dosage.
I agree that 'flowers' should be given fertilizer in sufficient amounts to really show-off... My thoughts lie more with shrubs and some perennials... Around here our major problem can be spider mites, aphids and other sap sucking insects... Where these pests may be common in some landscapes they are not in others...

Guess in which landscapes, we find these problems...

I agree with you that wise application is necessary for many arenas, but woody plants should grow more slowly...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #22  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:27 AM
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MarkintheGarden MarkintheGarden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
I agree that 'flowers' should be given fertilizer in sufficient amounts to really show-off... My thoughts lie more with shrubs and some perennials... Around here our major problem can be spider mites, aphids and other sap sucking insects... Where these pests may be common in some landscapes they are not in others...

Guess in which landscapes, we find these problems...

I agree with you that wise application is necessary for many arenas, but woody plants should grow more slowly...
I agree, the fert does produce a lot of new growth and that is like a free buffet for the sap suckers and we do see that in our area. The funnny thing is often the trees and shrubs are the right size for the landscape or getting there soon enough on their own, but some people will over fertilize them anyway. I guess if you over-fertilize, you can charge for that and then next month you charge for an application to eliminate the insects.

Most trees and shrubs I apply one application in the fall at half strength and that seems enough to maintain regular growth and keep the plants flowering well in the spring. And of course using the high ph fert for those that benefit from that.
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  #23  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:35 AM
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4 seasons lawn&land 4 seasons lawn&land is offline
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Originally Posted by ralph02813 View Post
@Ryan and lawnman: I am assuming in both examples you guys give we are talking about NEW customer - I cannot imagine tell an existing customer that I screwed up last year and put too much mulch down and some got molded so I have to charge you to take it out

In all day direct sun areas the mulch dries out pretty quick and never really breaks down. Thats when it gets stripped off (powerbroom works good!) 90% of the time nothing needs to get stripped off.
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  #24  
Old 12-31-2011, 09:50 AM
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MarkintheGarden MarkintheGarden is offline
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Originally Posted by 4 seasons lawn&land View Post
In all day direct sun areas the mulch dries out pretty quick and never really breaks down. Thats when it gets stripped off (powerbroom works good!) 90% of the time nothing needs to get stripped off.
This is true. If the mulch is not breaking down it is because the wrong fungus is growing and this does occur because of too little moisture. Sometimes this can be prevented by soaking it well when first applied. Also you can do the watering late in the day so that the moisture remains longer. Sometimes this is hard to prevent.
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  #25  
Old 12-31-2011, 03:03 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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One strategy that may help is to remove some of the coarser material, then work up the semi-decayed stuff underneath so it is able to soak up more water and bind to the soil under that... Next spring you have a clean bed of rotting mulch and are able to put a fresh layer of color on that... best of both worlds...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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