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  #181  
Old 04-09-2012, 01:37 PM
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No one is cobbling. This is step by baby step, with allowances made for unseen circumstances.
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  #182  
Old 04-09-2012, 01:45 PM
tonyvol tonyvol is offline
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[QUOTE=Kiril Until Tony does a full system audit with and reports the results back here one cannot determine what is actually required by the zones or if they can be reworked. Until that happens you should keep your uninformed "opinions" to yourself[/QUOTE]

Kiril, when I get the pressure gauge set up off of the RPZ then I can start collecting some data about the current sprinkler system. Do you agree?

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Make sure you don't make it too difficult to add a master valve later on. For now, you can get by without one. One reason you would put off a master valve, is that the system may not really need as much as the 25 gpm flows that were measured. 25 gpm is a point where you would look to use a master valve larger than a common 1-inch valve.

Is the RPZ going to be right at the supply line? Or will it be a distance away from it? (size the pipes accordingly)
Boots, I'll make sure I can add the MV later. Would you just add one to the system at the RPZ or would you add another one to the lake supply line before it gets to any zones also? I was thinking to just have one to keep the restrictions down on the water coming from the lake.

I was going to place the RPZ about 10-15 feet from where I'm going to connect to the main city water line. Then all zones would be feed after the RPZ. The RPZ works like a backflow preventer and a shut off valve? Right. It will keep lake water from getting into the city water supply(backflow preventer) and allow me to turn off or on city water to feed the sprinkler system (shut off valve) when the pump is down for maintenance or inoperable. Am I thinking correctly about how it works?
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  #183  
Old 04-09-2012, 01:48 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by tonyvol View Post
Kiril, when I get the pressure gauge set up off of the RPZ then I can start collecting some data about the current sprinkler system. Do you agree?
No. You are not going to collect anything more than you already have, except in a different location with RPZA losses included. You need way more information than that to make anything even resembling an informed decision.

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No one is cobbling. This is step by baby step, with allowances made for unseen circumstances.
Again .... ROFL. This is coming from the guy who suggested attaching a pressure gauge to the RPZ and reducing flow until the zones reach their breaking point. Yup ..... that is for sure an intelligent and professional suggestion ...... "with allowances made for unseen circumstances".
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  #184  
Old 04-09-2012, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by tonyvol View Post
Kiril, when I get the pressure gauge set up off of the RPZ then I can start collecting some data about the current sprinkler system. Do you agree?



Boots, I'll make sure I can add the MV later. Would you just add one to the system at the RPZ or would you add another one to the lake supply line before it gets to any zones also? I was thinking to just have one to keep the restrictions down on the water coming from the lake.

I was going to place the RPZ about 10-15 feet from where I'm going to connect to the main city water line. Then all zones would be feed after the RPZ. The RPZ works like a backflow preventer and a shut off valve? Right. It will keep lake water from getting into the city water supply(backflow preventer) and allow me to turn off or on city water to feed the sprinkler system (shut off valve) when the pump is down for maintenance or inoperable. Am I thinking correctly about how it works?
Yes, the RPZ is the backflow preventer, and the only kind that is rated for your application. The reason I mention new pressure readings after the RPZ is in place, is that the new 2-inch mainline will not have pressure losses at your current flow rates, compared to what you have today, so the measurements will accurately reflect pressures at each of the zone valves. You can then partially close the supply, to see how zones function with less pressure and flow, with the idea of seeing if you can work with 20 gpm or less in zones where you measured more flow.
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  #185  
Old 04-09-2012, 02:31 PM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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More of that grass is wet, electricity is free, water is an infinite resource, AE of 40% or less is acceptable mentality.

What's next? Are you going to suggest connecting one sprinkler at a time and "observe" it's performance before connecting another .... or perhaps replace with impacts that don't exist anymore?

Curious boots .... what is the size of the current mainline from the meter to the hose bibb?
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  #186  
Old 04-09-2012, 02:32 PM
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By the way, despite the larger size of your new mainline, and maybe the supply plumbing to the RPZ, the size of the RPZ itself can still be one inch, without any cost in pressure. Backflow preventers are rated for very high flows, that you almost never actually have, like 50 gpm for a 1-inch RPZ.
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  #187  
Old 04-09-2012, 09:38 PM
tonyvol tonyvol is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wet_Boots View Post
By the way, despite the larger size of your new mainline, and maybe the supply plumbing to the RPZ, the size of the RPZ itself can still be one inch, without any cost in pressure. Backflow preventers are rated for very high flows, that you almost never actually have, like 50 gpm for a 1-inch RPZ.
Hey guys have I told you that I appreciate your help with?
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  #188  
Old 04-09-2012, 09:56 PM
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You're just lucky the pump and the elevations make it all somewhat intriguing
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  #189  
Old 04-10-2012, 09:49 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Originally Posted by tonyvol View Post
Hey guys have I told you that I appreciate your help with?
You need to gather the information I have indicated you need. Not knowing how your system is supposed to function by design is a recipe for failure, not only with respect to your pump project, but with respect to the health of the landscape and your bank account. You need to determine (if you haven't already) your systems optimum operation point. That point is where the water is being applied and used in as an efficient as possible manner. Now you started by collecting your flow and dynamic pressures .... but 4 out of your 6 zones are operating at pressures that are less than optimum, particularly given where the pressure readings were taken. This is a red flag telling me your system in it's current state is not running as it should, and your flow readings are not to be trusted (i.e. they would be higher at optimum pressures). This is not the time to take short cuts or to play guessing games. Get the information and data you need to make an informed decision.
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  #190  
Old 04-11-2012, 04:26 PM
tonyvol tonyvol is offline
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Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
You need to gather the information I have indicated you need. Not knowing how your system is supposed to function by design is a recipe for failure, not only with respect to your pump project, but with respect to the health of the landscape and your bank account. You need to determine (if you haven't already) your systems optimum operation point. That point is where the water is being applied and used in as an efficient as possible manner. Now you started by collecting your flow and dynamic pressures .... but 4 out of your 6 zones are operating at pressures that are less than optimum, particularly given where the pressure readings were taken. This is a red flag telling me your system in it's current state is not running as it should, and your flow readings are not to be trusted (i.e. they would be higher at optimum pressures). This is not the time to take short cuts or to play guessing games. Get the information and data you need to make an informed decision.
Will this gauge work with any brand rotor sprinkler head? I have K-Rain. Have you guys used this one before? I was wondering if it works good.

http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Hu...itot-gauge.htm

I want to use it to check the pressure at the highest sprinkler head in the system.
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