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  #21  
Old 05-06-2012, 02:21 PM
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humble1 humble1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Think Green View Post
Humble,
You make a good point on deer being not the only culprit in tick spread. In my area, the deer are only in the county areas or better set 100 miles around our rice country. We have to travel to deer hunt. Lyme's disease must be a problem in your area as per the population of urban and city life meets. We are privy to squirrel, raccoon, mice,rat and other small rodents that pose a small issue, but tick populations arise from outside aerial applications of pesticides to crops. Then we do have areas of unpopulated rangeland. Ticks do mitigate looking for food....BLOOD! when the temperatures start to rise.
In essence, Arkansas requires a license for nuisance pest control such as mosquito's but the structural pest control section will cover outside and inside pests. My license covers outside pests of the lawn and landscape. Then again, if a tick,flea or other such structural pest enters the lawn area, it is covered under general lawn spraying of insecticides.
I again will treat a lawn to target pests in such areas of high traffic where the tick and flea will persist. I really wish the public was more conscious about pest issues then my business would benefit from the control.
I am talking about the blacklegged tick aka deer tick, they are the tick that transmits Lyme Disease in the north east, they simply do not travel far, their numbers are exploding around New England, because they are transported on deer, and birds. In a 2 year period the female blacklegged tick only requires 3 blood meals to complete its lifecycle, larvae, nymph and adault. They just wait 24/7
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  #22  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:55 PM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Humble,

I read the link before I posted it and interpreted it to mean that treating lawns would eliminate relatively few ticks. You are correct, some ticks can be found in some lawns. IMO, there is little to gained by spraying pesticides on large open lawn areas as a means to reduce the risk of being infected by Lyme Disease. Some good information can be found here.
http://co.monmouth.nj.us/page.aspx?ID=2857

The best method to reduce risk of Lyme Disease is to do daily, thorough body check for ticks and to properly remove them. http://www.lymediseaseassociation.or...=88&Itemid=424

"People like me" have had NJ pesticide Licenses for woody ornamentals and turf since the early '80s. People like me have managed pesticide divisions that had fleets of up to 11 spray rigs working 12 hrs a day. We have treated thousands of properties during this time period for many outdoor pest problems. People like me have learned that incorporating other methods of plant health care allows us to greatly reduce the amount of pesticides used while achieving better results. We have learned that this approach is very successful as a business model.

People like me accept the fact that other people have different ideas and beliefs. We choose not to make personal attacks just because others are not "people like me".
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  #23  
Old 05-06-2012, 10:07 PM
loyd meeks loyd meeks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phasthound View Post
With deer populations as high as they are around here they will get used to most spray products because hunger overrules deterrents. They have stripped forests of the under story plants except for barberry. With no saplings surviving, these forests will not last for more than 50 years.

There is a company that specializes in deer deterrent, can't think of there name at the moment. Fencing is the only long term solution I know of.

If you're trying to reduce ticks, don't bother spraying lawns because tick habitat is shady, brush and tall grasses.





BS. wherever deer go so go ticks. We don't have pets but neighbors do. We keep yard (well mowed and clean) sprayed because we get ticks from the lawn
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  #24  
Old 05-06-2012, 10:36 PM
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hurrikanelandscaping hurrikanelandscaping is offline
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Like i said i am not looking for something to spray flowers with.

What i am planning on doing is coming in with a sprayer and spray around all the property lines to create almost like a chemical fence.

This lady does not want any deer on her PROPERTY. Not really sure why but whatever.

I plan on using this stuff:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

It is called liquid fence and I will try and make an agreement with her to come and spray monthly to keep that chemical fence nice and strong.

Is this a good idea or will my solution not work?

Thanks
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  #25  
Old 05-07-2012, 07:24 AM
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humble1 humble1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phasthound View Post
Humble,

I read the link before I posted it and interpreted it to mean that treating lawns would eliminate relatively few ticks. You are correct, some ticks can be found in some lawns. IMO, there is little to gained by spraying pesticides on large open lawn areas as a means to reduce the risk of being infected by Lyme Disease. Some good information can be found here.
http://co.monmouth.nj.us/page.aspx?ID=2857

The best method to reduce risk of Lyme Disease is to do daily, thorough body check for ticks and to properly remove them. http://www.lymediseaseassociation.or...=88&Itemid=424

"People like me" have had NJ pesticide Licenses for woody ornamentals and turf since the early '80s. People like me have managed pesticide divisions that had fleets of up to 11 spray rigs working 12 hrs a day. We have treated thousands of properties during this time period for many outdoor pest problems. People like me have learned that incorporating other methods of plant health care allows us to greatly reduce the amount of pesticides used while achieving better results. We have learned that this approach is very successful as a business model.

People like me accept the fact that other people have different ideas and beliefs. We choose not to make personal attacks just because others are not "people like me".
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  #26  
Old 05-07-2012, 07:33 AM
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humble1 humble1 is offline
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Wow with all that experience then you of all people should know how ticks drop off of animals all over the lawn daily. If you need to google and post things as your own and then misinterpret what is very clear, then perhaps you should stay out of a thread that could ruin someones life listening to your very bad advice. So yes people like you should not give professional advise where your advice could ruin someones life, or with babesiosis kill someone.

Spray the lawn for ticks as the link said ticks are in the grass as well as woodline and beds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by phasthound View Post
Humble,

I read the link before I posted it and interpreted it to mean that treating lawns would eliminate relatively few ticks. You are correct, some ticks can be found in some lawns. IMO, there is little to gained by spraying pesticides on large open lawn areas as a means to reduce the risk of being infected by Lyme Disease. Some good information can be found here.
http://co.monmouth.nj.us/page.aspx?ID=2857

The best method to reduce risk of Lyme Disease is to do daily, thorough body check for ticks and to properly remove them. http://www.lymediseaseassociation.or...=88&Itemid=424

"People like me" have had NJ pesticide Licenses for woody ornamentals and turf since the early '80s. People like me have managed pesticide divisions that had fleets of up to 11 spray rigs working 12 hrs a day. We have treated thousands of properties during this time period for many outdoor pest problems. People like me have learned that incorporating other methods of plant health care allows us to greatly reduce the amount of pesticides used while achieving better results. We have learned that this approach is very successful as a business model.

People like me accept the fact that other people have different ideas and beliefs. We choose not to make personal attacks just because others are not "people like me".
Posted via Mobile Device
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  #27  
Old 05-07-2012, 08:55 AM
SMC SMC is offline
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Location: Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hurrikanelandscaping View Post
Like i said i am not looking for something to spray flowers with.

What i am planning on doing is coming in with a sprayer and spray around all the property lines to create almost like a chemical fence.

This lady does not want any deer on her PROPERTY. Not really sure why but whatever.

I plan on using this stuff:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

It is called liquid fence and I will try and make an agreement with her to come and spray monthly to keep that chemical fence nice and strong.

Is this a good idea or will my solution not work?

Thanks
Chemical repellents will not completely eliminate deer from entering a property. The only way to do that is a 10' - 12' fence. Repellents can reduce deer traffic as deer are looking for sources of food.
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  #28  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:50 AM
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phasthound phasthound is offline
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Killing ticks in and around someone's yard alone will not protect someone from getting Lyme Disease. Humble correctly points out that reducing tick habitat and understanding the part of rodents play in the disease cycle should be part of comprehensive plan to reduce the likelihood of contracting Lyme. He is also correct in stating that some ticks will be found on lawns. We differ in how important the later is to prevent Lyme, but otherwise we have so much more in common that I fail to see any reason to attack each other.
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Last edited by phasthound; 05-07-2012 at 09:59 AM.
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  #29  
Old 03-12-2014, 09:13 PM
capetrees capetrees is offline
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The most effective way to keep deer away is to kill them, period. Try all other deterents and the only one that truly works is death. But keep in mind, the deer are getting a bad name. Mice and other animals are spreading ticks faster than the deer.

Ticks on the other hand are hard to prevent and therefore need to be dealt with on an ongoing basis. There is no way to prevent ticks in the yard, regardles of whether its in the brush, in the trees, tall grass or short grass. Any warm blooded animal can carry them into your yard. Raccoons, mice, deer, bats, birds, rabbits etc. You name it, ticks can be carried. Kill all of the ticks on your lawn and the animals can bring them in the next day/night. Periodic spraying and granular tretments are the only way to deal with ticks.
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  #30  
Old 03-12-2014, 10:34 PM
SMC SMC is offline
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We have had excellent results with our tick spray program. While 100% control is impossible to achieve! you can significantly reduce tick populations on properties with one or two applications of synthetic pyrethroids. The key is to time your spray to go after the nymph stage of the tick and get good penetration into those areas where ticks are most likely to be found, leaf litter, pachysandra, tall grass, stone walls and the perimeter of the woods.
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