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  #1  
Old 07-13-2012, 01:53 PM
rrfk rrfk is offline
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Location: Pitt Meadows, BC
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What's wrong with these cedars

Hello everyone very informatie site thank you for your contributions.

This is my first day onsite. I have a concern about my clients cedars. Living in lower mainland BC things are usually lush and wet. However, we've been having a bit of a drought and I know these trees have even without water for at least tha long. Soil is dry, I'm guessing they're dying of thirst. Question is. Will they come back for this with a drink? Can I help them should they be watered deeply at 11Am on a hit sunny day or should it wait until after 6. Thanks in advance or your help.
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Old 07-13-2012, 02:11 PM
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Richard Martin Richard Martin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrfk View Post
Hello everyone very informatie site thank you for your contributions.

This is my first day onsite. I have a concern about my clients cedars. Living in lower mainland BC things are usually lush and wet. However, we've been having a bit of a drought and I know these trees have even without water for at least tha long. Soil is dry, I'm guessing they're dying of thirst. Question is. Will they come back for this with a drink? Can I help them should they be watered deeply at 11Am on a hit sunny day or should it wait until after 6. Thanks in advance or your help.
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They may be stressed from the drought. If you start watering them you have to keep watering them. The trees physiology is designed to weather droughts by shedding excess foliage. You may be seeing that now. You can water them but you must keep watering them. Taking them in and out dormancy is not good for their health. If you or your client makes the effort to keep watering them until natural rains return then yes, give them weekly deep long soaks. If you're not willing then leave them be.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:22 PM
rrfk rrfk is offline
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:31 PM
rrfk rrfk is offline
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Ouch. I had some terrible touchscreen typos there. I'm glad you got the gist though. I appreciate the response. I would like to have been a miracle worker on these trees. Save some of the earths precious life but the builder has decided to just replace them. Pity. I'll eventually be dried out and disposable too, I guess
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:37 PM
herler herler is online now
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With our reservoirs down to the mud banks in places we are already two feet below normal and so low on water I am literally scared to recommend irrigation so the way I handled this drought is first off we collect the condensation from our a/c unit(s) with several containers that hold around 5 gallons of water each.

That's free water, don't need as much as some might think, just set the buckets out near the down spouts,
some adjustments may be required, if it overflows some that is no problem.

Then I took a 5 gallon bucket and with a drill and a very small drill bit (a number 48 or thereabouts) drilled one very small hole in the bottom of the bucket.
To give a clue, a number 48 drill bit is far smaller than a dremel tool's standard bit although technically one hole from a dremel would probably do the trick too.

This is to provide a type of drip irrigation, you will need this to keep from wasting the water running down stream, drip irrigation allows water to seep into the soil thus requiring far less quantities of water for irrigation, we have found that 5 gallons is usually enough for one tree, thou if they are very dry it might require ten gallons.

Now I set the bucket with the small hole next to the tree on the up hill side, and fill it with water from the condensate containers.

Timing how long it takes for those 5 gallons to seep out through the hole would be helpful, we want it to take at least 20 minutes but not much over an hour or two.
30 to 60 minutes per 5 gallons would be about ideal, also watch for runoff, if the water starts to run off it's leaking out too fast.
The problem with it seeping out too slow is time constraint, much past an hour it's just taking too long.

You may have to drill more than one hole but I would start with one, if you drill too many or drill too big I have sealed them back up with PVC glue.

Set the water out anytime past 6p.

Works like Magic.

Last edited by herler; 07-13-2012 at 11:42 PM.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:44 PM
rrfk rrfk is offline
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That's an awesome conservationist hack.
I'll consider it for next time, probably not the a/c as we dont (and probably won't) have any water shortages in Vancouver this year, but I like the bucket idea in lieu of the clients willingness, yet inability to water.

Although moot now, I meant to attach a photo to my OP. Sorry for the lack of info.
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Old 07-14-2012, 12:01 AM
herler herler is online now
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I can totally agree with using regular tap water in lieu of condensate, the point was actually more about drip irrigation,
mostly because it conserves a lot of water but also it has to do with your time and cost consideration.

Because the bucket with the little hole you can set it up and put water in it and come back the next day for your bucket.
Or bucketsss, set it up once and you are assured the water is hitting the spot, drip irrigation allows ALL 5 gallons to seep straight into the ground with very little to NO run off!

They also make certain devices not sure what they are called but we see other companies have been using these around community trees such as in median strips, the city seems to like them...

I like the bucket(s) myself.

Last edited by herler; 07-14-2012 at 12:07 AM.
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