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  #1  
Old 08-30-2012, 12:50 AM
CK82 CK82 is offline
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Location: Southern Wisconsin
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Soil test complete Very high K and P

I'm looking for recommendations on what should be done to a customers lawn in order to have good reseeding results. Any recommendations? His lawn is absolutely toast (dead), all of his neighbors did not water through the extreme drought, and there lawns came back nearly complete. All surrounding lawns had full sun for the better part of the day. My customers front and side yard is no more. I'm afraid to reseed and have things burn up again.

The soil tested out at: pH: 6.9
P: 83
K: 105
Organic Matter: 3.7%
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  #2  
Old 08-30-2012, 09:26 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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The first question would be 'Why, his lawn and not everyone else's???" I don't believe their P and K has much to do with it and SOM is really quite good... Does he mow during the heat? Does he apply herbicides during the heat of Summer? Was it Fescue? Full sun should be KBG and should be given a chance to go dormant with dignity when the excessive heat comes on... I've read that Fescues do not go dormant, but actually die... however it takes a lot more to kill a good stand of fescue... Is he on sand???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #3  
Old 08-30-2012, 11:53 AM
CK82 CK82 is offline
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Small axe, He put his weed control and fertilization company on hold since last late last Fall. His soil seemed to be decent soil with even a little dark black..organic matter possibly. I'm not certain if he mowed during the peak of the drought, its possible i guess if the lawn was looking bad. I know he did not water at all though. I believe the lawn is Kentucky blue and fescue, maybe more fescue than blue though.

We end up aerating, power raking, overseeded, and apply a light fertilizer. Some of the areas came up in almost like a thick, dead, sod mat. I'm hoping that we dont have areas that the power raking didn't break up the matting and we will have bad seed to soil contact. Is it bad to seed with high P and K? He's watering the newly seeded areas daily, no germination quite yet.

What would you recommend doing at this point as far as any further renovation. Should we lightly topdress to cover the seed and give it a for sure small amount of seed to soil contact? Or just water the heck out of things for a bit and see what comes through?

Thanks much,
Chris
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Old 08-30-2012, 12:55 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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It sounds like that you've done enough to it that, even if, there was living thatch,,, it should be roughed up enough to allow grass to grow just fine... this 95 degrees with dessicating winds wasn't really what I anticipated when I sowed seed 10 days ago, but we have germination, thanks to irrigation and shade... you probably could have given it more time to come back on its own, but with plenty of water for a week or so you should be fine with your new seed... back into the 70s next week for high temps, which will definately be good news for my next seeding project...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #5  
Old 08-31-2012, 11:31 AM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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Was original lawn fine fescue? Not good in heat. Was there a high percentage of perennial rye...not good above 90.
However, when you reseed you are forced to use a percentage of perennial rye, as it has good seedling vigor. Kentucky bluegrass will seldom give a good "take" it just comes in too slow. In any event use top-quality seed.
If you want Kentucky bluegrass--use sod. Let the experts grow it for you.
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  #6  
Old 09-01-2012, 01:25 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
Was original lawn fine fescue? Not good in heat. Was there a high percentage of perennial rye...not good above 90.
However, when you reseed you are forced to use a percentage of perennial rye, as it has good seedling vigor. Kentucky bluegrass will seldom give a good "take" it just comes in too slow. In any event use top-quality seed.
If you want Kentucky bluegrass--use sod. Let the experts grow it for you.
Agreed... but it would be good to know whether the client is able to sustain such an expensive lawn... you showed pictures of a hydroseeded lawn that ended up producing a healthy crop of CG so unless the client has the resources to protect the sod from utter destruction, he might have to ,,, play it safe...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #7  
Old 09-14-2012, 01:33 AM
timturf timturf is offline
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what depth was the sample taken at?

What was the cec?

I believe the p2o5 is to low.....helps with stress

Low maintence lawn.........consider the fine fescue...us a lot here, and we have much more heat!

I grown turfgrass in northern Ill.
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  #8  
Old 10-01-2012, 11:00 AM
CK82 CK82 is offline
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Sample was taken at about 4"+ depth.

What is cec?
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  #9  
Old 10-01-2012, 11:03 AM
CK82 CK82 is offline
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I don't believe they tested for cec, if you are referring to cation exchange capacity?
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  #10  
Old 10-31-2012, 08:47 PM
timturf timturf is offline
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Labs assume sample depth is 6"...........so all your values are off
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