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Old 10-04-2012, 08:24 PM
tigers2007 tigers2007 is offline
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Yard flooding mitigation project

I have an issue that I'm having a problem with dealing with due to the large scale nature of the project. Apparently about five years ago, the neighbor across the road did a massive manipulation of the terrain to create a flooding disaster for this person. The water seems to be coming from a 12" culvert pipe nearby that drains into a different neighbor's roadside ditch. Looking at satellite imagery from different years, you can clearly see how changes in the landscape have created this "seasonal raging river" that is literally washing away this persons lawn. I would guess that about 120+ cubic yards of terrain has been washed away by looking at historical photos and seeing the massive depression in the landscape.

With that said, and just short of "blowing up" the culvert (as that would be illegal), what do you think would be the best way to mitigate this problem? The home owner doesn't want an above ground water feature as I suggested. Maybe we could "control" but not block the output of the culvert with a device and then just trench some rigid 4" or 6" tubing down - french drain style?

Right now I'm considering raising the property level behind the easement with low berm and install the drainage tubing.

What do ya'll think?
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Old 10-04-2012, 08:36 PM
tigers2007 tigers2007 is offline
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Old 10-04-2012, 08:48 PM
Darryl G Darryl G is offline
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I think they should contact an attorney. Directing water onto some else's property like that is a form of tresspass just about everywhere. If there are town/county/city/state roads that the water runs along and/or under they can try to talk to them to see if a solution can be found, but other than spending a large amount of money to culvertize that, I think it's a legal solution. Either that or dig a pond and enjoy it.
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:59 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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I think a series of low berms that capture the water into larger puddles that will have time to soak into the ground before it all goes down stream... the berms do not have to be noticeable and they can still be mowed easily...
Depending on the type of soil, 1 may enough, but I'd think 2 or three would do the trick under most soil conditions... and plant a bunch of trees such as techny to block the view of the neighboring property...
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:18 AM
Mark Oomkes Mark Oomkes is online now
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Does your county or township have a drain commissioner?

Does the culvert cross the road?

Were all the necessary permits received to install the culvert?

I think there might be some recourse here before just "dealing" with it. As Darryl stated, most of the time someone can't just do whatever he wants with runoff.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:42 AM
tigers2007 tigers2007 is offline
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The culvert is under the road and has probably been there for over 50 years. The county drain commissioner says that it is not their jurisdiction and that the property owner must contact the state. The state doesn't have any staff and has not answered any calls for help. The only thing I do know is that I permits to dump dirt.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:46 AM
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White Gardens White Gardens is offline
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Only other option is to contact an ag drainage company.

Have them come in and tile in a 12" drain tile and get rid of the surface water. Then put a riser and berm at the head to catch as much of it as possible before it runs on the surface.

That would be the easiest solution in my eyes.

They would also be in and out in a day to day and a half.

......
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:48 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by White Gardens View Post
Only other option is to contact an ag drainage company.

Have them come in and tile in a 12" drain tile and get rid of the surface water. Then put a riser and berm at the head to catch as much of it as possible before it runs on the surface.

That would be the easiest solution in my eyes.

They would also be in and out in a day to day and a half.

......
I agree. If you aren't going to make a pond or stream bed, then this is the only realistic option. Given the amount of erosion that has already occurred I might consider just going with the flow and making it a stream bed.
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Old 10-05-2012, 10:59 AM
Darryl G Darryl G is offline
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Yeah, people pay big bucks to have water features installed in their yards. This one was free!
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Old 10-05-2012, 11:26 AM
tigers2007 tigers2007 is offline
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Yeah I'm trying to sell it that way. Thanks for the advice. I didn't even consider contacting an ag contractor as this is something a lot closer to their line of work.
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