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  #11  
Old 10-05-2012, 05:34 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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How often does this flood???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #12  
Old 10-05-2012, 06:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smallaxe View Post
How often does this flood???
That was going to be my next question.

If I had to take a wild guess, it looks to be whenever it rains.


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  #13  
Old 10-05-2012, 08:03 PM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I believe you're right...

Around here we have problems like that, and the worst is always in the Spring thaw, while the ground is still frozen... big rains on thawed turf sometimes can be managed , but underground drainage does nothing when frozen...

A scaper friend of mine installed a parking lot built from various sized rock then covered with pavers and anytime of the year, no matter how much raging water comes by the place, it never reaches the other side before its gone... even winter rains can't turn to ice there...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #14  
Old 10-05-2012, 09:11 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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There are a lot of young aggressive lawyers out there--sue 'em. A good lawyer will cut through the red tape and find out exactly who controls drainage in the area.

After you install it, Mr. customer will feel better if someone else pays for his new drainage system. Or pond.

You can always build a raised berm flowerbed...say 6 feet high...so no water would flow down to your customer's property until the level was 6 feet higher upstream.

Last edited by RigglePLC; 10-05-2012 at 09:15 PM. Reason: ps
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  #15  
Old 10-07-2012, 01:49 PM
tigers2007 tigers2007 is offline
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This flows every time there is a heavy downpour. I suppose that if a berm is put in, it would just flow around it. This property is at a highpoint. I suppose it would take some major ditch work to make the storm flows stay in the ditch system. The is heavy wetlands down the road, and down the hill.
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  #16  
Old 10-08-2012, 05:30 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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We often just plant a bunch of pine trees around areas tha wash frequently and easily...

The soil doesn't allow for drainage behind a possible berm???
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #17  
Old 10-08-2012, 11:53 AM
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Weeping willow trees are also a good specimen to plant to help suck up the excess water.


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  #18  
Old 10-08-2012, 06:50 PM
brown thumb brown thumb is offline
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Agree with the willow....I would also look into a diversion mound/berm and swath of native vegetation to enhance infiltration.
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