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  #21  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:41 AM
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BeachysLawn BeachysLawn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herler View Post
Generally speaking, fulfilling a profession involves a formal education.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_professions

You see landscaping in there?

Most of the rest of those professions require master's degrees...
All except maybe nurses and military officers, and maybe there exist a few more but they all require college as well..
Are you really quoting a source as unreliable as Wikipedia? And thats a pretty short list of professions. I dare say there are a number of professionals who would take umbrage at not being included in that list.

Look at the actual definition of professional and you will find that, while landscaping is an industry, referring to yourself as a professional of an industry is a perfectly proper use of English.

Professional: (from merriam-webster, not wikipedia)
a : of, relating to, or characteristic of a profession
b : engaged in one of the learned professions
c (1) : characterized by or conforming to the technical or ethical standards of a profession (2) : exhibiting a courteous, conscientious, and generally businesslike manner in the workplace
2
a : participating for gain or livelihood in an activity or field of endeavor often engaged in by amateurs <a professional golfer>
b : having a particular profession as a permanent career <a professional soldier>
c : engaged in by persons receiving financial return <professional football>
3
: following a line of conduct as though it were a profession <a professional patriot>
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  #22  
Old 10-06-2012, 09:44 AM
DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I think it is because we live in a "class" society. In England your status is based on your blood line. Here it is based on not only your education level but where you were educated as well as what you do for a living. Did you go to Harvard? Are you a Doctor? Funny that dentist don't get as much respect as a General practitioner ie see old Seinfeld episode Many cut grass for a little spending money when they were kids and teens so they will always look at grass cutters in that light. That is just the way it is. No matter if you look and act like a Pro. People used to call it Snobbery.
Charles,
Are you an anti- dentite?
That was a great episode!
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  #23  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:03 AM
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Charles Charles is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DEPENDABLE LANDSCAPING View Post
Charles,
Are you an anti- dentite?
That was a great episode!
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Yes it was. Then there was the one about the Dermatologist getting no respect--"Pimple Popper!" Oh you treat skin Cancer too forgot about that
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  #24  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:13 AM
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jackal jackal is online now
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Well I don't know about the rest of you, but I am a pro.
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  #25  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:50 AM
LHS Lawns LHS Lawns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachysLawn View Post
Are you really quoting a source as unreliable as Wikipedia? And thats a pretty short list of professions. I dare say there are a number of professionals who would take umbrage at not being included in that list.

Look at the actual definition of professional and you will find that, while landscaping is an industry, referring to yourself as a professional of an industry is a perfectly proper use of English.

Professional: (from merriam-webster, not wikipedia)
a : of, relating to, or characteristic of a profession
b : engaged in one of the learned professions
c (1) : characterized by or conforming to the technical or ethical standards of a profession (2) : exhibiting a courteous, conscientious, and generally businesslike manner in the workplace
2
a : participating for gain or livelihood in an activity or field of endeavor often engaged in by amateurs <a professional golfer>
b : having a particular profession as a permanent career <a professional soldier>
c : engaged in by persons receiving financial return <professional football>
3
: following a line of conduct as though it were a profession <a professional patriot>
That pretty well sums it up.
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  #26  
Old 10-06-2012, 10:53 AM
LHS Lawns LHS Lawns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I think it is because we live in a "class" society. In England your status is based on your blood line. Here it is based on not only your education level but where you were educated as well as what you do for a living. Did you go to Harvard? Are you a Doctor? Funny that dentist don't get as much respect as a General practitioner ie see old Seinfeld episode Many cut grass for a little spending money when they were kids and teens so they will always look at grass cutters in that light. That is just the way it is. No matter if you look and act like a Pro. People used to call it Snobbery.
Sad but true.
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  #27  
Old 10-06-2012, 12:16 PM
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lawnworker lawnworker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS Lawns View Post
I run my part-time lawn and landscape business in a very professional manner.
Fully insured, licensed for pest app on turf and ornamental, nutrient management certified for fert app. US DOT certified for the truck and trailer.

Truck has company logo and all license numbers.

I conduct myself in a professional manner in both verbal and written communication.

I keep my customers long term.

I feel I represent the industry very well. We should all try to be the best we can be.

Please don't think I'm trying to make myself out to be better than someone else as a person. I'm very humble and I thank the Lord for all he has done for me. Couldn't have done it without him.

As I said I'm part-time. In my full time job I work for the State Dept. of Agriculture as Soil Conservation Planner. We help farmers protect soil and water resources on their farmland which in turn helps the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the US.

I don't tell my customers that I'm part-time, I don't think it matters either way but I still don't.
When they do find out what my full time job is its like I've been elevated to a higher level which makes me believe the business itself doesn't get much respect.

It happened this year with a second year client. She practically bowed down to me.

Had another client who just found out and said I feel better with you taking care of my lawn because you know what you are doing. I've had him for about six years and I never heard that before. Same work same results.

I've always kept a high standard I set for myself and my work but now I'm better at what I do?

And even a new client I just picked up a few weeks ago who has seen me in the area for years asked me point blank what my full time job is. I felt like he was saying you couldn't possibly be doing just this for a living.

I'm not complaining, I'm fine with it. My situation sounds like it will have a positive outcome.

It just seems to me the lawn/landscape business doesn't get the respect it deserves.
LHS, I think customers are surprised for two reasons. The first one being the fact that your education exceeds most of you typical solo lawn maintenance operations.Secondly, I am a little surprised that you would even be in business with the position you are in with state department of agriculture.
A position like that is my dream job; having completed a bachelors in environmental science recently, I have been looking for a position in conservation or land use planning. Therefore, I am not surprised your customers might wonder why you are doing both. Probably a mix of the fun of being outside and making extra cash is the reason you are doing both.

It is all about perception in lawn care. Everyone from drunks to college graduates is out maintaining property for customers.
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  #28  
Old 10-06-2012, 12:25 PM
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puppypaws puppypaws is offline
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You are, what you believe in your mind to be...opinions are just what the word defines...a belief or judgment that rests on grounds insufficient to produce complete certainty.

Act and display yourself as a professional, and this is what the public will define you to be.
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  #29  
Old 10-06-2012, 05:06 PM
LHS Lawns LHS Lawns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lawnworker View Post
LHS, I think customers are surprised for two reasons. The first one being the fact that your education exceeds most of you typical solo lawn maintenance operations.Secondly, I am a little surprised that you would even be in business with the position you are in with state department of agriculture.
A position like that is my dream job; having completed a bachelors in environmental science recently, I have been looking for a position in conservation or land use planning. Therefore, I am not surprised your customers might wonder why you are doing both. Probably a mix of the fun of being outside and making extra cash is the reason you are doing both.

It is all about perception in lawn care. Everyone from drunks to college graduates is out maintaining property for customers.
One of the reasons I do it is being my own boss and owning my own business is very rewarding. There's nothing like it. Of course the income is great too.

I really took the business up a couple notches in the last 5-6 years with the licenseing and equipment. With the always unstable State budget concerns I wanted to be ready to hit the ground running if I had to take it full time.

Yes it is a dream job, I've been blessed to be at my position for the last 15 years. With the time off that I have at work its a no-brainer to go out and start a business. Alot of guys in my position are in the lawn/landscape business.

Without working in a field office there is no way I could successfully run the business.

Those that know I have another job admire my work ethic and the fact that I can get it all done when I say it will be done. You can almost set your watch any time of the week when I pull on to any customers property , weather permitting of course.

I never mention it when I get a new customer because I'm afraid it will turn them off. I was surprised by the positive feed back I got when a few customers found out.

I just never took the time to work it into the presentation. Maybe I'll reconsider.

Sounds like you have the right degree. Check out your local Soil Conservation Office. Usually they have Federal, State, and County positions. At least thats what is in Maryland.

Last edited by LHS Lawns; 10-06-2012 at 05:14 PM.
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  #30  
Old 10-07-2012, 06:34 AM
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Tharrell Tharrell is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Mount Airy, NC aka Mayberry
Posts: 2,967
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeachysLawn View Post
Are you really quoting a source as unreliable as Wikipedia? And thats a pretty short list of professions. I dare say there are a number of professionals who would take umbrage at not being included in that list.

Look at the actual definition of professional and you will find that, while landscaping is an industry, referring to yourself as a professional of an industry is a perfectly proper use of English.

Professional: (from merriam-webster, not wikipedia)
a : of, relating to, or characteristic of a profession
b : engaged in one of the learned professions
c (1) : characterized by or conforming to the technical or ethical standards of a profession (2) : exhibiting a courteous, conscientious, and generally businesslike manner in the workplace
2
a : participating for gain or livelihood in an activity or field of endeavor often engaged in by amateurs <a professional golfer>
b : having a particular profession as a permanent career <a professional soldier>
c : engaged in by persons receiving financial return <professional football>
3
: following a line of conduct as though it were a profession <a professional patriot>
Ha ha ha ha!
Very good.
When I saw the wiki quote I just rolled my eyes but you verbalized it.
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