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  #31  
Old 10-09-2012, 08:49 PM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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So for those of you who mainly or in large part use a liquid fert program how large are your tanks?
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  #32  
Old 10-09-2012, 11:48 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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I use a 100 gallon skid. Most of my lawns are 1/2 acre or less and it would do me no good to ride around with 300-500 gallons of a mix that is specific to one lawn. As I said before, I do liquids because of the difficult requirements of each lawn.
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  #33  
Old 10-10-2012, 07:32 PM
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Think Green Think Green is offline
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Greendoctor,
Do you have a city hydrant meter for on the go?
Otherwise, I use a 100 gallon tank for lawns of 1/2 acre and smaller. I am at 2 GPK at best depending on my leg speed.
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  #34  
Old 10-10-2012, 10:01 PM
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ted putnam ted putnam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trueturf View Post
Yes liquid ferts are expensive especially growth products imo they are better left for the golf course guys. They do have a product I really like though
6-0-0 Xtra Iron gives me a good greenup on my St. Augustine and Centipede yards that dont need as much fert as the Bermudas also its a little cheaper than Nitro. If you really want to do some liquid ferts just get some Urea or Uflexx and melt it down in your tank you can get creative and add some Iron and Potassium maybe even a herbicide if need be. I do this quite a bit especially on new yards that need a big turn around quick.

That's the best advice I've seen in this thread. If you don't have access to Uflexx or Umaxx and you'd like your N stabilized, add some Hydrexx to your sprayable urea in solution. The rest can be your own recipe as far other macros or micros. If you're going to use a ride-on, mix accordingly and have it in the tank you plan to nurse from. Just remember that lower volume mixes are more concentrated and much less forgiving when it comes to mishaps. JMO
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  #35  
Old 10-11-2012, 06:39 AM
ArTurf ArTurf is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Think Green View Post
Greendoctor,
Do you have a city hydrant meter for on the go?
Otherwise, I use a 100 gallon tank for lawns of 1/2 acre and smaller. I am at 2 GPK at best depending on my leg speed.
It seems to me that if you are using 2 or more gallons per 1000 SF that makes for a lot of mixing time. Not criticizing just wondering if I would ever go to a partial liquid program and the time efficiency of it.
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  #36  
Old 10-11-2012, 08:01 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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See avatar and personal page pics. I used a 400 gallon tank and one-ton truck. Mixed urea and KCl. I did not have much trouble dissolving it--but I had to take special precautions to prevent urea from sucking into the filter. I planned to use 3 gals per thousand, but I walked fast enough--it eventually turned out to be about 2.6 gals per thousand sqft. I used about one bag for 68 gallons of water; 25 percent less at 80 degrees or more, 50 percent less at 85 degrees or more.
About 3 of five treatments were granular.
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  #37  
Old 10-12-2012, 06:10 PM
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Think Green Think Green is offline
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Riggle,
Then at 85 degrees or more, you are reducing your rate by 50%!
Did I get you right!
This is our attitude in 100 gallons of water at 2-3 GPK. I know the rate for my grass is 1#/M per growing month up to a total of 5#'s perM/year on heavy managed-irrigated lawns.
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  #38  
Old 10-12-2012, 08:49 PM
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cwnla cwnla is offline
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20-0-3 5gallons fert to 10 gallons water spraying 3gp/k
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Last edited by cwnla; 10-12-2012 at 08:50 PM. Reason: forgot contact info
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  #39  
Old 10-14-2012, 03:08 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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You heard right; to us 85 degrees is hot. I think urea will cause burn of bluegrass if a pound is applied per thousand sqft in a liquid form. So...we tried to switch to granular during hot months. Or we applied granular followed by liquid herbicide.
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