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  #11  
Old 10-10-2012, 12:53 AM
StanWilhite StanWilhite is offline
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I personally don't think ExMark has a thing on Gravely....they're both good machines.
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  #12  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:23 AM
smallstripesnc smallstripesnc is offline
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I use a 36in gravely pro walk hydro with pro steer as my main unit for now (hope to get ztr next season) and its great. No issues and its very well built. Almost have 150hrs since aug with no issues.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2012, 11:40 AM
Jimslawncareservice Jimslawncareservice is online now
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I have a stander and ztr demo lined up for next spring so I can see the cut in good growing condition. Only thing left here are leaves. I should say they are both gravely, instead of everyone assuming that they are.
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  #14  
Old 10-10-2012, 01:43 PM
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hammmerhead hammmerhead is offline
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Some old info about Gravely's early, early days (From Wiki)

Benjamin Franklin Gravely (29 November 1876 – January 1953) of Dunbar, West Virginia manufactured in 1916 a hand-pushed plow fitted with an auxiliary Indian motorcycle engine and driven by belts.[2] His goal was to build a tractor which would revolutionize gardening and lawn maintenance for the homeowner.

A friend who owned a machine shop allowed Gravely to build more tractors at his shop. It was there that Gravely designed the engine and built six or seven of the first tractors, which weighed about 190 pounds each. He also developed several new tools for the engine and drive train.

IncorporationThe Gravely company was incorporated in 1922. In the mid-1920s, Gravely decided to build and market the tractors commercially. He and several backers raised enough capital to purchase an old factory in the Dunbar, West Virginia area that had previously been used for the manufacture of tires.[2] One of the stockholders, Eustace Rose, a close friend and a mechanic, inventor and engineer, collaborated closely in the development of the tractor. Rose is also reputed to have invented the first automatic transmission used by the Chrysler Corporation.

Survival and growthStrong sales assured the company's profitability through the Great Depression. Customer loyalty was an important element in this success. In the company's earliest years, Gravely would load several tractors into his Studebaker tourer car and sell them to farms as far away as West Virginia and Florida at $175 each. He would then drive back and pick up another load.

Within a few years, sales outlets had been established from coast to coast, with international sales representatives in Germany, France and Switzerland.

Ben Gravely sold his stock in Gravely Tractor in 1940 and died 13 years later. His company was gradually acquired by the Studebaker Corporation by 1960 and later sold off by Studebaker-Worthington.


1959 model Still getting it done

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  #15  
Old 10-10-2012, 02:21 PM
hackitdown hackitdown is offline
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My first job back in 1977 was working on a small 10 acre farm. The boss had A Gravely tractor with the mower (with a sit-down sulky), a rototiller, and snowthrower. He chopped 3 of his fingers off with the snowthrower one winter. I loved mowing with it, it was badass. The mower/sulky combo would wheelie if I tried to speed up too fast, driving the handlebars down into my knees. You could stack extra wheels onto the drive wheels to increase traction.



In the '60s I lived in a huge apartment complex, and the maintenance guys had a bunch of them for mowing and snow removal. They were everywhere.
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  #16  
Old 10-10-2012, 03:53 PM
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ProStreetCamaro ProStreetCamaro is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OakNut View Post
Like the Easter bunny and Santa Clause, I know they are real, but I've never seen one.




That is just like walker and hustler around here. Non existent. Not many gravely's either but I have seen a few more this year. I saw a state truck with 2 new 400's on the trailer and a crew that cuts in my neighborhood has one also. Here it is exmark, toro, scag and bobcat.

If Gravely keeps up what they are doing right now I can see them becoming one of the top names in commercial lawn care equipment. What I am afraid of is I don't want to see them get so big that customer service and build quality goes down hill. That happens to every company that gets huge. If they can keep there focus and keep the cs and build quality in check I really do think they will become huge.
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2012, 04:21 PM
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jrs.landscaping jrs.landscaping is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OakNut View Post
Like the Easter bunny and Santa Clause, I know they are real, but I've never seen one.



Same for me.
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  #18  
Old 10-10-2012, 06:41 PM
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Richard Martin Richard Martin is offline
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We have a dealer locally but I've still yet to see a Gravely on a trailer. I had 2 Gravelys a while back and didn't care for them.
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  #19  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:25 PM
StanWilhite StanWilhite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hackitdown View Post
My first job back in 1977 was working on a small 10 acre farm. The boss had A Gravely tractor with the mower (with a sit-down sulky), a rototiller, and snowthrower. He chopped 3 of his fingers off with the snowthrower one winter. I loved mowing with it, it was badass. The mower/sulky combo would wheelie if I tried to speed up too fast, driving the handlebars down into my knees. You could stack extra wheels onto the drive wheels to increase traction.



In the '60s I lived in a huge apartment complex, and the maintenance guys had a bunch of them for mowing and snow removal. They were everywhere.
I'll bet your boss enjoyed the 30% discount he got on his manicures!
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  #20  
Old 10-10-2012, 08:29 PM
RussellB RussellB is online now
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The old Gravelys were bad arse. Even had a true reverse just had to watch for jack knifing. Pinched my keg many times turning and my brother snapped his ankle when his foot slipped off and under the sulky.
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