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  #11  
Old 10-24-2012, 07:36 PM
ztman ztman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CLS LLC View Post
And then buy stock in the tire company of your choice because you're going to eat tires. When I bought my limited slip dodge 2500 a friend warned me that it goes through tires quick and I thought he was full of it... I get about 10K miles out of a set of tires before they are down too far to make it through a winter plowing.

Don't get me wrong, I do like having the limited slip, especially for plowing but it is exclusively a work truck. My daily driver doesn't have it and I'm just fine with that seeing as how I get about 40k miles out of a set of tires on that truck.
try the goodyear dura trac. awesome tire
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  #12  
Old 10-24-2012, 07:48 PM
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CLS LLC CLS LLC is offline
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Originally Posted by birddseedd View Post
I would guess they were either real soft performance tires, or you had a bad set. i never go threw tires like that. course, i dont drive like alot of guys. i take it easy when i drive, saves gas and wear on the truck. the only time my tires skid is if im on gravel. limited slip isnt like a locking diff or 4wd. if you drive easy, your wheel wont skid and you wont lose rubber.

to my best understanding. but i sure dont go threw tires. frankly any tire that only gets 10-15k has something wrong with it, or they are super performance tires.

either way. limited slip every time, i dont like getting stuck pulling 5k lbs of sod threw mud.
The tires are General Graber AT2's, a good quality all terrain tire, by no means a performance tire.

You're not entirely correct on your under standing of a limited slip differential. In a standard clutch type limited slip, such as Dodge uses, the differential must over come a certain amount of torque preload before the tires can turn at different rates of speed. Before that torque amount is met, the tires are resisting a differential in speed, thus increasing tire wear. All manufactures set up their differentials with a different amount of torque required before differential action can take place.

A torsen differential on the other hand works all together differently, and in those the tires don't need to over come a torque preload before rotating at different speeds.

If you are interested in a better understanding of differentials, more information can be found here: http://www.bildon.com/catalog/about/diffs.cfm
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  #13  
Old 10-24-2012, 07:51 PM
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CLS LLC CLS LLC is offline
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Originally Posted by ztman View Post
try the goodyear dura trac. awesome tire
I'll have to look into them. This time I went with Treadwright Warden A/T's. They are retread's, but have many positive reviews. With how fast I go through tires on my work truck, I had to find something more reasonably priced. We'll see how it goes with them.
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  #14  
Old 10-24-2012, 10:40 PM
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dstifel dstifel is offline
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With the new 1500's supposedly getting 25mpgs i am going to be looking at one this spring. I have a dodge now and love it never seems to lack power no matter what i am pulling.
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  #15  
Old 10-24-2012, 10:48 PM
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tbambersvc tbambersvc is offline
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Dealers around here are offering new Ram's for $10k plus off the sticker. They are nice trucks for sure.
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  #16  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:10 AM
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precision8m precision8m is offline
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I love the Ram trucks. The new ones look great. I would bump up to a 2500 Cummins if I were you and love the better mileage and towing capabilities, but the 1500's are nice.
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  #17  
Old 10-25-2012, 10:34 AM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CLS LLC View Post
And then buy stock in the tire company of your choice because you're going to eat tires. When I bought my limited slip dodge 2500 a friend warned me that it goes through tires quick and I thought he was full of it... I get about 10K miles out of a set of tires before they are down too far to make it through a winter plowing.

Don't get me wrong, I do like having the limited slip, especially for plowing but it is exclusively a work truck. My daily driver doesn't have it and I'm just fine with that seeing as how I get about 40k miles out of a set of tires on that truck.
I have an 05 jeep TJ, 83,000 miles, limited slip rear, original tires. 01 GMC Suburban, 111,000 miles, limited slip, 68,000 first set of tires. 2nd set still going strong.
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  #18  
Old 10-25-2012, 11:03 AM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Originally Posted by birddseedd View Post
what kinda lock?
Open rear all torque goes to the wheel that turns the easiest. Thus one wheel on ice spins and you go no where.

Limited slip both wheels get power when one wheel starts to lose traction so the non slipping wheel still gets power and should drive you through the bad spot mud/snow/ice/sand/dirt/whatever.

With a limited slip if the one wheel is spinning the other wheel getting power does not have enough traction to move, you will go no where, then you press on the gas more which causes the limited slip rear to act as an open rear, all the power goes to one wheel and you will just spin a tire.

Low speed low torque the rear acts as it is locked. High enough torque and the rear acts as if its an open rear.

Locked rear or locker can be permanent full time but can not be used on pavement only for off road applications.

Or can be made to be turned on or off as needed. When unlocked the rear acts as a open rear. Or locked as a locked rear. Locked means no matter how much gas you give power goes to both wheels all the time.

This is why a locked rear is used off road. On dirt/sand if slippage has to occur the tires will slip in the dirt.
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  #19  
Old 10-25-2012, 11:17 AM
birddseedd birddseedd is offline
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iv been told when you are in that situation with a limited slip you can press the brake and both will spin again. at that point ur not getting traction on either wheel and ur kinda screwed anyway.
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  #20  
Old 10-25-2012, 11:42 AM
32vld 32vld is offline
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Reason when going in a straight line both rear wheels are turning at the same speed. Because both wheels are covering the same distance at the same speed.

When turning the outside wheel has to cover more distance then the inside wheel. Open rear differential (clue as to why it's called a differential) is that when making turns the wheels have to be able to turn/revolve at different speeds. Other wise the tire that does not keep up with the axle will be dragged forward by the axle to keep up with the other wheel. Tires resist being dragged on pavement.

Limited slip rears will let the wheels turn at different speed when turning, acting as an open rear. Then will not let the wheels slip so both wheels get power when going straight because both wheels are turning at the same speed.

When tires start to lose traction the limited slip mechanism will try to keep the rear acting as if it was a locked rear and both wheels get power. However if enough gas is given the limited slip mechancism will allow rear to act as an open diff then all power goes to one wheel. One wheel spins and you go no where.

This is why limited slip is no where as good as 4wd. Though a lot better then an open differential.

Permanent locked rear. When on dirt and the rear is locked so both wheels have to turn at a different speed the slower outside wheel/tire will slip in the dirt easily as it is being dragged to keep up with the faster moving inside wheel/tire. When going straight or turning and you open throttle wide both wheels will always get power no matter what.

Jeeps and I sure there are others that have locked/lockers differentials that can be turned off an act as an open diff when on the road and can be locked by the flip of a switch for when off road. Jeep has front and rear lockers that can be turned on and off.

Yes you can drive on a snow covered road with the diff's locked because the tires will be able to be break traction enough with the snow to get dragged when the tires are being turned at different speeds.

However plowing with a locked rear is not good because the trucks wheels are behind the plow on pavement that has had the snow removed.
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