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  #11  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:25 PM
DLONGLANDSCAPING DLONGLANDSCAPING is offline
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The owner of "Birmingham Lawn" a huge company around me, also owns 6 different landscape companies that he bought out all operating under a different business. He carries really low class employees at one company, and high end mowers and collard shirt workers at another and you see them everywhere. If i wasnt a landscaper i would have no clue that it was owned by the same guy.

I cant remember the other company names but he is living in a 5 million dollar house in BLoomfield Hills next to Gov Romney's brothers house.
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  #12  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:25 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Originally Posted by alldayrj View Post
I thought about starting sister companies to make me seem bigger but also to funnel each other work and recieve more calls for their profiled work.
for example, I'm set up as a RJ Falcone GC Inc but if I made "Falcone Masonry and Concrete", "Sod King", and "Flawless Grading and Excavation" they each might get more calls for their respective area of expertise. Even though my current company does all these things, the name doesnt say it. Just like deelong says
Yes, and in my opinion having a company like "Sod King" would seem to specialize in that service only. As opposed to "Johnson Lawn & Landscape" Yeah Johnson could pull it up but "Sod King" is specialized in sod and could probably do a much better job.
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  #13  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:27 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Originally Posted by DLONGLANDSCAPING View Post
Exactly! Its like having a plumbing company and a snow plowing company. (kinda bad example) But some plumbers plow snow too in the winter.

If you could market one of your businesses for a niche industry such as pure lawn mowing you could streamline crews and get a full route of just mowing and fill a route easier with advertising for JUST mowing.

You could on your website include: We recommend "XYZ Landscaping" For great landscape designs as a partnet company of ours..... .Thats not illegal and you arent lying. So it wouldnt make it awkward for a customer to use both services. You would just have a different crew taking care of different services with a different truck...

Some people my appreciate the quality of a niche company more than a laundry list lco.
Great point! Plus, and maybe I'm speculating out of my expertise, but niche marketing for websites should be indexed by google easier. I thought I read that somewhere.
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  #14  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:29 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DLONGLANDSCAPING View Post
The owner of "Birmingham Lawn" a huge company around me, also owns 6 different landscape companies that he bought out all operating under a different business. He carries really low class employees at one company, and high end mowers and collard shirt workers at another and you see them everywhere. If i wasnt a landscaper i would have no clue that it was owned by the same guy.

I cant remember the other company names but he is living in a 5 million dollar house in BLoomfield Hills next to Gov Romney's brothers house.
Interesting. Is he doing the same services in all of these businesses? If he is it's like he's catering each business to a certain financial demographic. High class employees/equipment for those style of customers, and vice versa for lower clients.

It's obviously working for him...
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  #15  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:29 PM
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alldayrj alldayrj is online now
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Even directing people towards my website showing pics of all the different work I do I still get "do you do sidewalks? what about walkways? driveways? patios?" I think even concrete and masonry is to generic for some people to grasp but where do you stop? sod king, paver pros, sir stoops alot, patio boss, mulch man etc. I guess if you're big enough you go for it and then when people sue patio boss for a trip and fall you dont lose paver pros and sir stoops alot too!
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  #16  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:31 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Originally Posted by alldayrj View Post
Even directing people towards my website showing pics of all the different work I do I still get "do you do sidewalks? what about walkways? driveways? patios?" I think even concrete and masonry is to generic for some people to grasp but where do you stop? sod king, paver pros, sir stoops alot, patio boss, mulch man etc. I guess if you're big enough you go for it and then when people sue patio boss for a trip and fall you dont lose paver pros and sir stoops alot too!
That's a really good point. Plus on a tax basis, if every one of your businesses are under a certain amout for sales (dollars) it would keep you from a higher tax basis. Where as if you had one company do all of these services, chances are you'll be at a higher business tax rate...I think that's correct.
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  #17  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:36 PM
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alldayrj alldayrj is online now
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I know a guy who owns at least 6 separate companies and I think they all operate out of the same yard. I'm sure if you get a greedy enough lawyer or taxman they will get your money though. His businesses don't really compete directly. concrete ready mix, precast, excavation, hauling, limosines, and roll offs. might have to sit down and ask him about it one day.
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  #18  
Old 11-20-2012, 11:49 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Originally Posted by alldayrj View Post
I know a guy who owns at least 6 separate companies and I think they all operate out of the same yard. I'm sure if you get a greedy enough lawyer or taxman they will get your money though. His businesses don't really compete directly. concrete ready mix, precast, excavation, hauling, limosines, and roll offs. might have to sit down and ask him about it one day.
Yeah well I was thinking of trying another one next season, for a total of 2 companies. I think it's worth a shot.
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  #19  
Old 11-21-2012, 07:38 AM
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tonygreek tonygreek is offline
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But do you think that could work? I mean, if you knew for a fact that you could get another website up at a cheap price and you were guaranteed first page of google before next spring/mowing season, do you think that would drive in a lot more business than just one website?
As with any other site, it depends on your market competition. Could I do that for, say, Springfield, Ohio? Sure. Could I do it for a step up to Dayton? Probably, but it will take significant effort. Columbus, Ohio? Not likely, due to the competitive environment.

If someone guarantees you first page, by the Spring, I would take my budget elsewhere. There are no guarantees. And if there are, you might want to make sure that guarantee doesn't get you hammered by Google with their next algorithm change. The reality is that guaranteed search rank is one of the easiest sniff tests of who you're dealing with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy123 View Post
Great point! Plus, and maybe I'm speculating out of my expertise, but niche marketing for websites should be indexed by google easier. I thought I read that somewhere.
Mowing split out from Maintenance, for example, is not really a differentiating niche in the way niche markets are regarded. For the size sites typically seen in the lawn and landscape industry, unless you really see yourself putting in the effort, I think you're better off having a deeper site relating to both mowing and landscaping. When you start splitting out content, you start increasing all related efforts, while also lowering your potential inbound sources. Now, if you have a genuine need to spin off a business, there's no reason not to, but I don't think I'd let this idea be the precipitating event.

A better example of a niche site would be Mowing vs Organic Mowing using only human-powered reel mowers or Fert 'n Squirt vs Organic Fert 'n Squirt.
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  #20  
Old 11-21-2012, 08:22 AM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Tony Greek

Okay thank you for that info that really gives me more to think about. You brought up some really good points.

On the website...this website builder has built 4 sites within the last year and they have all been on the first page of google within a few months. He actually wouldn't say a guarantee, but every site he has built, which is more than four, are on the first page of google.

With that in mind would you still consider this?
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