Register free!
Search
 
     

The Green Industry's Resource Center


Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old 11-29-2012, 05:54 PM
dstifel's Avatar
dstifel dstifel is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: des moines ia
Posts: 738
I won't disagree with the fact that of u dont have a degree there is a good chance you will have to physically work harder. I accepted that fact and would rather it be that way then wear a suit and tie everyday.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 11-29-2012, 07:12 PM
MDLawn MDLawn is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Western NY
Posts: 1,284
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstifel View Post
I won't disagree with the fact that of u dont have a degree there is a good chance you will have to physically work harder. I accepted that fact and would rather it be that way then wear a suit and tie everyday.
Posted via Mobile Device
Agreed. I don't ever have to wear a suit and tie to work and then I just change into boots, carhartts, and a shirt and mow, dig, etc... It's great. Not every highly degrees job requires a suit and tie. Also I enjoy physical labor but like knowing I don't have to do it when I'm 60 let alone 45.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 11-29-2012, 07:23 PM
Weekend cut easymoney Weekend cut easymoney is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Texas-The Hilly part
Posts: 2,817
Hard work keeps you young. My grsndfather was a farmer and could outwork most guys half his his age even at 78....very healthy until cancer hit...
__________________
1989 BlueChevy 1500 Extended cab with FULL bed
1978 7ft Sears cargo trailer with added wood inserts to hold both my weedeaters
3 1976-83 vintage lawnboy lawnmowers with full self propel features as well as mulch kits
2 Sears electric weedeaters
1 green machine electric leaf blower
1 sears articulating hedge trimmer-electric
2 50ft power cords
3 Leaf rakes
1 shovel
1 pocket knife
cooler for beer
lawn chair to enjoy a beer while I wait for the cash to be handed to me
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 11-29-2012, 07:50 PM
MDLawn MDLawn is offline
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Western NY
Posts: 1,284
That's why I do it part time for now. Plus my full time involves "labor" but the fun type.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 11-29-2012, 08:32 PM
dstifel's Avatar
dstifel dstifel is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: des moines ia
Posts: 738
Alls I'm saying is it is not essential to be successful. My father never took a college class in his life worked construction straight out of college. After 15 years of doing that he got a chance to interview to be the business agent for the local carpenters union. IT was him against 4 college graduates. He won , this was not only an interview but several tests had to be taken as well, which he outscored the people. PErfect example of how real world experience can outweigh sitting in a class room for four years.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 11-29-2012, 08:37 PM
cpllawncare's Avatar
cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 2,644
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstifel View Post
How many of us know college grads in a job that has nothing to do with their degrees? Not saying college is going to hurt you but it does take a financial toll
Posted via Mobile Device
More than you think! I have a degree in electronics, paid for by the US Army, it wasn't until after ten years of service that I got my degree, but after realizing that working in Corporate America was a joke at best, working around mostly engineers most couldn't even read a set of dial calipers, and then there was the glass ceiling that I hit. Getting laid off was the final straw, degree or no degree, I have quite a few friends that are now business owners that have degrees in everything from biology to engineering but realized the same thing I did, even with the degree there is only so far your going, I basically wasted a bunch of time getting a degree that did nothing for me. I feel like I'm years behind the people that have been in business, I think that if you realize that your true passion is to have your own business, why waste time sitting in a classroom, going in debt when you could be out building your business, as part of that process take a few business classes along the way to give you some insight as to how business works, you don't need the full blown degree to get you there. I've met plenty of people that don't have degrees that I would love to have working for me, but of course they have their own business. Don't get me wrong, I totally understand the college degree concept, I just don't put a ton of faith into it. It's the personal drive that makes the man a success or not, no amount of college education can out do someone that has the drive and willingness to succeed.

Last edited by cpllawncare; 11-29-2012 at 08:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 11-30-2012, 01:25 AM
Southern Heritage Southern Heritage is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Birmingham Al
Posts: 143
I have a turf management degree and Horticulture degree. It didn't make me where I'm am to day but certainly it did not hurt me.. I learned a lot and have a successful full time company with 11 full time guys. I started with truck trailer and 21's. it did help me sell big jobs because I knew the terms to make it sound better then what it is. But with out a degree I would have learned it over time.
Aka I wanted to be a golf course super until my 3 rd year of school when I met my first super and decided it wasn't for me. You ever add up what they get paid and actual hours it can be under what you pay you labors. Then the stress. Not for me.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 12-03-2012, 01:24 PM
JContracting's Avatar
JContracting JContracting is online now
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Champlin, MN
Posts: 1,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenI.A. View Post
i have a duel BS and am working on both a MS and MBA.

I don't think a degree is 100% necessary for a good business, but it does definitely help. Having a business, or business related, degree will definitely help with the behind the scenes of a business. Like tony said above, even if you don't go for a full degree, taking a few basic classes such as communications, writing, low level business and accounting classes will definitely go far at helping you and the business.

I'll add this, college is more about the learning process than the subjects you actually learn. This is why companies will prefer any type college degree for basic positions over someone with out a degree. College shows that you know how to learn and can learn different topics/subjects. I can also say, 90% of the time I talk to someone for a few minutes, I can clearly tell if they have a college degree or not by how they talk and present themselves. If you do not think this effects your business, it does.
This post explains it all.

I will graduate with an Associate's in Horticulture in the spring (1 class remaining). I still haven't decided if I will pursue another degree. I spent 1.5 years (3 semesters) right after high school at UND pursing accounting but I didn't like being there and I had transferred to Anoka Technical College. Had 2 really crappy teachers (old guys) and they retired after my first semester here. The newest teacher (there are 2 existing, younger teachers) is actually a landscape contractor and is only in his lower 30s. Basically a hardscape genius, we did a permeable paver patio w/ 2 waterfalls crashing onto it and the water runs through and recycles back through the falls with 3 freestanding walls, as a project in class. Now that we finished the project, each student is using Pro Landscape Design Software to design what they would want for plants, mulch, lighting, around it.

In my eyes, getting an education, whatever it may be, is never a waste. Except maybe Women's Studies or Fine Art or some BS like that.
__________________
'01 Chevy 2500 HD ECLB w/ 8.1 - 06 Tow Mirrors, 285s, 17" MB Chaos Wheels, Torsions Cranked, Airlift Airbags
2014 Diamond Cargo 8.5' x 20' Enclosed Trailer - Fully Loaded Interior
Exmark Lazer Z X-Series 52" w/ Ultravac
Exmark TTHP 36"
225 Gal MN Wanner Skid Sprayer
8' Boss RT3 Straight Blade

Licensed MN Commercial Pesticide Applicator

Graduate - Anoka Technical College w/ Associate's in Hort/Landscape - May 2013
In business since Feb 2011.
22 Years Old.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:18 PM
cpllawncare's Avatar
cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 2,644
If there was an assoc degree horticulture program avaible around here I would take it, along with some business classes. The closest I can get is a Master Gardeners program, which I want to take anyway. I want to know as much as possible about the industry and all it entails, I love learning new stuff. just wish I could get paid for it.
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:27 PM
JContracting's Avatar
JContracting JContracting is online now
LawnSite Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Champlin, MN
Posts: 1,615
Quote:
Originally Posted by larryinalabama View Post
I dont have any degrees and If you go to school 4 years please do something besides cutting grass.

Im a Master Mechanic and could fall back on tht if ever needed. I would encourage everyone to have a backup plan, try to learn some sort of trade. I guess the irragation fellers could fall right into pluming, or the lighting fellers could fall into electrictions.

You never know when a drout or even gas going up to 7$ per gallon could wipe out our business.
If it were only "cutting grass" you wouldnt be in business for yourself. You would be a laborer, not a BUSINESS OWNER. Regardless of what industry it is and services or products a business offer, you are still an owner, whether it be a garbage hauling company or an investment brokerage. When you own a garbage hauling service, you are not "just hauling garbage", or "just selling stocks". There is much more to it. Same goes with owning restaurants or whatever. Many go to college, many don't. But owning a service business is much more than just doing the service. That is how an ignorant mind thinks.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:53 AM.

Page generated in 0.08964 seconds with 9 queries