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Old 12-07-2012, 06:08 PM
mmrunyan1 mmrunyan1 is offline
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Location: Wood River, IL
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A Vacancy In The Industry

After much research with the lawn care companies, over 100 people in my area, and various others, there is a clear opening for a business to serve residential customers with small to average size lawns. People are having difficulty getting a company to service their small to average lawns. My lawn is average size for the area, so I checked this out for myself, and indeed, there is a problem finding company that provides professional quality service on an ongoing basis to the average homeowner in my area.
My question is this:
Would this niche be enough to build a business on in this industry? Is this a specialty in that could be utilized? Has anybody done this and been successful?
What all services should be offered at this level, more than just mow and go?

I have seen various opinions that small jobs are the bread and butter of the industry, as well as opinions that the majority of clients should be businesses.
So, any and opinions and advice are welcome.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:16 PM
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dstifel dstifel is offline
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A Vacancy In The Industry

I would say all my yards on small to average. Find growth is not as easy because in these neighborhoods it is easier to mow it yourself and don't seem to pick up many neighbors. However towards the end of last season I picked up a small yard in an older community. The guy previously doing it went under during the drought and had 12 of the 15 yards on the street. I believe this community could be gold for me.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:37 PM
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JParisan JParisan is offline
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It is not so much the size of the yard, but the value of the house. I cut about 40 homes in a neighborhood of $300,000+ homes. The yards are about .3 acre, at $40 a pop. For me higher income clients are much less of a headache. They always want the seasonal extras done. I get many more referrals out of them as well. People with money tend to be friends with other people with money.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:52 PM
Duekster Duekster is offline
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In my area many yards are 1/7 of an AC so there is a min charge.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:58 PM
larryinalabama larryinalabama is online now
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.3 acre lot for 40$ sounds a little low?
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:09 PM
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JParisan JParisan is offline
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My area is over saturated with low ballers and here this year/gone the next companies. I started out with the common areas. The HOA asked me if they referred me a bunch of work if there could be some sort of discount. I offered 40 a yard, and had 20 lawns right out of the gate. Now $45 would generally be the norm where I am. Easy decision for all those properties in a stationary area. Especially with the yards being flat square lots without a bunch of obstacles.
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:22 PM
mmrunyan1 mmrunyan1 is offline
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Location: Wood River, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dstifel View Post
I would say all my yards on small to average. Find growth is not as easy because in these neighborhoods it is easier to mow it yourself and don't seem to pick up many neighbors. However towards the end of last season I picked up a small yard in an older community. The guy previously doing it went under during the drought and had 12 of the 15 yards on the street. I believe this community could be gold for me.
My advertising is going to be toward several of the more upscale areas near my base of operations. As many have stated, .3 acres seems fairly common when consulting the maps of these areas some up to a half. I can surely see how it could be difficult in some areas. Thanks for the input.
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:24 PM
mmrunyan1 mmrunyan1 is offline
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Location: Wood River, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JParisan View Post
It is not so much the size of the yard, but the value of the house. I cut about 40 homes in a neighborhood of $300,000+ homes. The yards are about .3 acre, at $40 a pop. For me higher income clients are much less of a headache. They always want the seasonal extras done. I get many more referrals out of them as well. People with money tend to be friends with other people with money.
Thanks for the input and advice. Definitely worth the time to secure the homes that are more apt to provide the "friends with money" referrals.
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  #9  
Old 12-07-2012, 11:26 PM
mmrunyan1 mmrunyan1 is offline
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Location: Wood River, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JParisan View Post
It is not so much the size of the yard, but the value of the house. I cut about 40 homes in a neighborhood of $300,000+ homes. The yards are about .3 acre, at $40 a pop. For me higher income clients are much less of a headache. They always want the seasonal extras done. I get many more referrals out of them as well. People with money tend to be friends with other people with money.
Also glad to hear the $40 mark. That is something I have been pondering. I have done the side job arena and I know that $30 just doesn't cut it. $40 however makes it worth my while.
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:31 PM
mmrunyan1 mmrunyan1 is offline
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Hey everyone. Thanks for the input and for taking your time to help the new guy. I posted about equipment and such before. Now my question is this: How much to charge for the extras and what extras should I provide. I will already be offering the standards of mowing, edging, trimming, hedge work and garden bed tilling as well as leaf removal. So, what to include in the base price and what is extra and how much to charge? I want to maintain a competitive price without low balling the competition and I don't want to diminish the standard pricing in my area.
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