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Old 12-11-2012, 12:36 PM
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Dirtykneez Dirtykneez is offline
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Location: Deer Park NY
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Dw 410 sx

Hello all, I have followed this forum for quite sometime, and now decided to participate.. I'm curious as to if anyone on here that uses a ditch witch 410 machine ever tried using a traction style blade? I am currently doing a big project at a new housing development and the ground conditions are super hard. The machine is having trouble staying in the ground while pulling pipe. I have had this machine for over 15 years and have never had any issue whatsoever pulling pipe and staying at my desired depth... Im just looking for some input on buying the blade as opposed to the standard blades.. Do they really work, and are they worth the major price difference? The blade i am speaking about can be found here.. http://plcunderground.com/tractionbladestrdwseries.aspx as opposed to the standard duty 200 dollar blade.. Thank you for your time...
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:43 PM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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that blade geometry is somewhat reminiscent of the old Pipe Piper blades, which got a definite pull-down effect from the replaceable "bullet points" that they used
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:54 PM
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Dirtykneez Dirtykneez is offline
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Yes it does look like that. I do have a 230 piper buried at the shop, but I believe this ground will absolutely destroy the machine. I guess I can always open trench with the 410 if the ground compositions doesn't change as we get deeper into the development. Thank you for your response...
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Old 12-11-2012, 02:26 PM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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You might take a tip from the Piper playbook and pre-plow before actually pulling pipe. Maybe fiddle with an old plow blade and try welding on a point to make it something like a ripper.
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Old 12-11-2012, 04:28 PM
GreenAcresIrrigation GreenAcresIrrigation is offline
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On my Vermeer LM42 the blade has a large round bullet at the base extending forward, at first I hated it, but it does wonders for helping maintain depth in bad soil conditions. It just like large tile ploughs used for field tile, if you study them the tips extend to about under the machine when at depth. That increases traction drastically. One other thing to try and this may not help, and you may be doing it already, trench a starting hole at the depth you want the pipe and go. If the blade has a "boat keel" to it, it will still just want to ride up. Good luck!
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Old 12-13-2012, 10:42 PM
Mdirrigation Mdirrigation is online now
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On real dry ground I have a blade that I welded 3/4 in steel pipe ,it goes down olmost to the tip . I attached a hose quick connect to the top . I dig a start hole drop in the blade and fill the hole with water then I start leaving the hose on just a bit . The water helps quite a bit .
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