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  #11  
Old 12-17-2012, 08:01 PM
andyslawncare andyslawncare is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed2hess View Post
Those roses are anemic and need more fertilize. You have got to fertilize them monthly year round. New ones isn't going to solve the problem of them not growing. And don't overthink this pruning you can't hurt knock out roses but don't cut them to the ground. Take a winch to em Those could be pulled out by hand.
Your willing to pull an established KO out with your hands, feel free. They do have sharp spines my friend, and there is not root root here. No thanks.
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  #12  
Old 12-17-2012, 08:53 PM
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Landscape Poet Landscape Poet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyslawncare View Post
I blame on old age and lack of juvenile pruning + shade. I've noticed very healthy azaleas and camellias in the same beds; the roses are healthy too, just old. The roses are still blooming today.
You have provided enough information for me to say you should know the problem. You have stated they are sparse and have been since doing a rejuv pruning last year, and azaleas and camellias are in the same bed but thriving. I do it would be stretch to imagine that those roses are not the right plant for that place.

Although I agree with ed that roses are generally heavy feeders, in your case I do not think fertilizer is the answer until they are moved to a location which allows more favorable growth conditions. More fertilizer could essentially cause more stress.
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  #13  
Old 12-18-2012, 07:25 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Good point Poet, that is just what I wanted to say about location. W/out sunlight the fertilizer isn't very helpful and may indeed cause additional stress...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
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  #14  
Old 12-18-2012, 06:47 PM
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Think Green Think Green is offline
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Andy's
I agree.......late to read the posts.
Knockout Rose's need full sun to produce the best shape. The twisting trunk seems remnant of the plant growing toward the sunlight.
I also agree that these plants are not in the correct spot.......and yes fertilizing them even with extra phosphate for blooming will only hurt them.
If this customer allows, prune them back down to two feet tall and relocate them to a suitable location. After new growth starts according to your weather conditions, then add a low nitrogen fertilizer until blooms ensue.
I see people buying these plants from all over and planting them in place of other rose's that do not fair so well. The same issue of low light and poor air circulation causes any rose to be subject to leggy stems, powder mildew, blight, rose spot, stem borer and nematodes.

For me..........the problem has been Mosaic Virus on this species.
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  #15  
Old 12-20-2012, 07:52 PM
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ed2hess ed2hess is online now
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I have not any problem with fertilizing causing more stress as long as you use the one I recommended. The other thing is.....these things need water the more the better.
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  #16  
Old 12-27-2012, 01:12 PM
LHS Lawns LHS Lawns is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed2hess View Post
I have not any problem with fertilizing causing more stress as long as you use the one I recommended. The other thing is.....these things need water the more the better.
I agree with the water issue. At our home we have two area's of KO's. One area is a stand alone full sun bed. Just them and a few other accent plants but the KO's are the dominant plant.

I prune them down in the Spring about 18"-20". They are about four years old now and they are spectacular. I think I've fertilized them twice in four years. You couldn't ask for more out of a plant than what these beauties give.

The other area is part sun and shade in a bed with some Manhatten Euonoymus and they look like yours, very weak and frail. In the Spring and Fall they perk up with the rains but the Manhattens suck up too much moisture in the Summer months.

I think the combo of part sun and lack of good moisture is holding our KO's back and what I can see from your picture it might be the same problem.

When ours go dormant we are moving them to an area with full sun and plenty of moisture along with being a few steps from the water hose for easy watering if needed.
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2013, 09:46 AM
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gunsnroses gunsnroses is offline
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http://www.ars.org/?page_id=3241

Rose Rosette Disease will be something to look out for (or just kill all wild roses), I would pull those ugly things out and replace with something else. Roses are over rated in my opinion.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2013, 09:59 AM
LHS Lawns LHS Lawns is offline
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We never had roses at our home before, just too much maintenance. When the KO's came out with their low maintenance rep we gave them a try and they have been great.
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2013, 10:22 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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I still ain't sure what all the hassle is about "Too Much Maintenance" is all about... I've had various roses my whole adult life and to tell you the truth ,,, the old floribundas are no more hassle to care for than the knockout rose or anything else...

If people are thinking about those stupid Tea Roses that get fungaldiseases over winter because they have to be "Protected from winterkill" then I guess that would explain it,,, but those are just manmade freaks of nature and aren't really roses at all... they're expensive annuals...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #20  
Old 01-10-2013, 12:32 AM
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Mahoney3223 Mahoney3223 is offline
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I usually prune my ko's in the fall and they come back nice. I don't like them getting huge. I have a property where the ko's are gigantic. They only let us prune a tiny bit off them. They look like trees, lol. I wanted to let mine @ home get bigger but then the animals came and ate them lol.
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