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  #11  
Old 01-16-2013, 09:01 PM
mirrorlandscapes mirrorlandscapes is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Northern IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilmore.Landscaping View Post
+1 definitely the right thing to do.

There always comes that point in the season when you have to use experience to know when to stop. Many contractors out there would have rushed through the job and gotten their money and would have been nowhere to be found come spring.

Well done!
Thank you! Definitely lesson learned and thankfully without much damage other than some pride...which never hurts to lose a little of.
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  #12  
Old 01-16-2013, 09:07 PM
GreenLight GreenLight is offline
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Location: Birmingham, Alabama
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Originally Posted by mirrorlandscapes View Post
Well lets see, being honest with them, admitting my mistake, explaining what went wrong (which wasn't entirely a lack of knowledge on our part), giving them all their options (which included losing the job) and not charging them anything...under the circumstances, I'd say yes.

You seem level headed and aware. I don't know of any contractor I have ever met that doesn't have a horror story or 10 about learning very basic things the hard way (and costing themselves a lot of money in the process). No matter your level of education, inexperience in certain areas will often times slap you around. The great part is you learned a lesson you will never repeat. It's going to happen, roll with the punches and move on with a smile on your face.
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  #13  
Old 01-16-2013, 09:11 PM
mirrorlandscapes mirrorlandscapes is offline
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Lol i have my share failure is the best teacher
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  #14  
Old 01-16-2013, 09:48 PM
mrusk mrusk is offline
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Location: northern jersey
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I think the job will be okay. You said you removed the frozen layer of soil on day 2. Then you put down stone. Then you removed the frozen layer of stone the next day. If you never installed stone on frozen ground you will be fine. The key to winter work is get the base in and level before it freezes. Doing as little as covering an area with a tarp can prevent frost.
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  #15  
Old 01-16-2013, 09:57 PM
mirrorlandscapes mirrorlandscapes is offline
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Location: Northern IL
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Should have been more clear. Dug out base on day 1 and had base rock in piles waiting to be installed. everything froze overnight (unless geotextile kept subbase from freezing). Broke the piles of rock up and installed unfrozen rock probably on frozen ground. never checked under geo. Tarp would have been great idea thanks i didnt think that would prevent freezing. I'll know for next time
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  #16  
Old 01-16-2013, 11:32 PM
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DVS Hardscaper DVS Hardscaper is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenLight View Post
You seem level headed and aware. .
Yeah, I tried to mess with him and he took it all in stride
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