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  #101  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:21 AM
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ETPRO ETPRO is offline
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A rotten morning...

After replacing a burned up pump this morning on my sprayer. Sprayed good for one yard and it started clogging. After much "stirring" (thinking the solution had settled out or something while I was changing the pump) I reached into the bottom of the sprayer to find this guy lodged into the intake. Don't ask me how he got in, the tank was closed up all season under the shed... That'll ruin a morning.
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  #102  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:37 AM
Mikegyver Mikegyver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastTexasProscapesLLC View Post
I didn't want to, but I chose a school 4 hours away. Glad I did it. My business wouldn't be supporting my wife and I if I wouldn't of.

I would doubt you would find anything online. Your learn more in your labs with hands-on work. You don't have to give-up your business. Nachadoches isn't that far away from Longview. Go to SFA. You can sometimes schedule classes where they are only on Tuesday and Thursday. That's the way to go. Leaves lots of time to work.

One man's opinion, but I wouldn't waste my time on an online program. I don't know they may be out there and they may be great. But thinking of what I picked up during school, 90% was affirmed in labs. Don't think I would know how to apply what I learned without labs.
I'm not in Longview proper, I'm closer to Gilmer, which puts me right at 1.5-1.75 hrs away from SFA. That's my main beef. I'd have to have yet another vehicle that gets good mileage to commute back and forth. That's in addition to at least one if not 2 (most likely) trucks. That gets expensive!

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I might add, you can do very well in this business without a degree. There are many on here that do very well without. But, personally, I wouldn't be in as good of shape with my new business without.
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Originally Posted by Turf Dawg View Post
Talking about degrees.
You may think this sounds crazy, but after years in this field I think it is best to get a business degree if you are going to have your own company. If you plan on working for someone else the horticulture degree would be the way to go.
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Originally Posted by EastTexasProscapesLLC View Post
Mikegyver, You could most likely get a business degree online and do well with it. Turf Dawg, How many years since you graduated and how many years in business?
If anything I'll try to clep a lot of the non-hort stuff required for the degree (US history, Political Science, Social Science, Performing arts, etc). Or I may just take the hort classes and not get the degree. I'm not into the whole "college experience" and would rather spend less time in classes for things I don't need. I already have all the experience I feel like i need in the area of public speaking, I am the vice president of a organization of 280+ people and regularly speak in front of 130+ people at monthly meetings. I also took some college level courses while I was in high school in subjects like history and such. Plus my dad teaches history and economics so I'm kept well versed in much of that. Not to say that classes like that are not good, its just I don't feel like it is necessary for me for the path I am taking.
Like I said somewhere else, I'd like to take some further business classes. Mainly some accounting to reinforce what I already know. I've taken accounting 101 but would like to build on that. Maybe some web classes.
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  #103  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:42 AM
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Turf Dawg Turf Dawg is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastTexasProscapesLLC View Post
Mikegyver, You could most likely get a business degree online and do well with it. Turf Dawg, How many years since you graduated and how many years in business?
Ah man, you are making me show my ignorance
I graduated High school in 1985. I did enroll in Jr College but working full time that only lasted a semester. I started mowing part time in 1995 and went full time in May 2004. I would have went full time sooner but I needed 17 years of service to get full retirement.

Trust me, I have nothing against Horticulture degrees and feel they are a great thing to have [wish I had one]. I do think time in field, short courses, seminars, reading, ect...... can also give you knowledge in this field. I truly feel that "People Skills" and business sense is what can make you or break you.
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  #104  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:49 AM
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Turf Dawg Turf Dawg is offline
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Originally Posted by EastTexasProscapesLLC View Post
After replacing a burned up pump this morning on my sprayer. Sprayed good for one yard and it started clogging. After much "stirring" (thinking the solution had settled out or something while I was changing the pump) I reached into the bottom of the sprayer to find this guy lodged into the intake. Don't ask me how he got in, the tank was closed up all season under the shed... That'll ruin a morning.
He was probably in the water hose getting some bugs and taking a good ol nap, untill you ruined it you mean ol bully
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  #105  
Old 02-20-2013, 08:55 AM
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ETPRO ETPRO is offline
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Turf Dawg, completely agree on hands on, seminars and short courses. Nothing can replace the hands on. I probably learned just as much in 6 months at the golf course internship as I did in at least a year or two of college. Nothing can substitute the hands on experience.

What branch did you serve in? Much respect.
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  #106  
Old 02-21-2013, 10:27 PM
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ETPRO ETPRO is offline
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He was probably in the water hose getting some bugs and taking a good ol nap, untill you ruined it you mean ol bully
Tell me about it. What a crappy way to go. Drown in a pesticide sprayer.
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  #107  
Old 02-21-2013, 10:40 PM
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ETPRO ETPRO is offline
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Rainy day

Rained most of today. Secured a new large maintenance account today. Organized the job trailer. (I'll actually post pictures of it now that it looks acceptable.) We usually pull this in and park it on a new install. I keep an assortment of fittings, slip fixes, glue tools, valve locator etc in the F150 for service calls. Don't want to have to drag a trailer everytime I go to do a repair. Also use this to transport small loads of plants.
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  #108  
Old 02-22-2013, 04:44 PM
Mikegyver Mikegyver is offline
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Looking good!!!!
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People pay you to hold their hand. If you don't like doing it, then you are in the wrong business.
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  #109  
Old 02-22-2013, 04:56 PM
FlawlessLawns FlawlessLawns is offline
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Hey guys I'm extremely new to this industry and very young. I'm 18. I still have another year of high school to get through. I plan on getting a business management degree with a focus in entrepreneurship. However, I have recently found myself torn between going ahead with that, and getting a degree in horticulture. I'm just wondering if you guys think that it would be at all possible to get schooling in both? Whether that be just getting the business degree while doing the seminar/some classes/reading kind of self taught approach...or actually going through and getting my business degree and then getting a hort degree on top of that...?? Any advice on this or hell, anything regarding this industry would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,

Lane
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  #110  
Old 02-22-2013, 05:06 PM
Mikegyver Mikegyver is offline
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Hey, you might go for a hort major and then take business classes along with that, most hort degrees require some business classes anyways.
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Quote:
People pay you to hold their hand. If you don't like doing it, then you are in the wrong business.
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