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  #81  
Old 02-28-2013, 01:19 PM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duffster View Post
Who and what are you responding to?

Most cops don't know the difference between interstate, intrastate and intercourse.
Sure they do. They know that last one means they can screw you if they want to.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl G
I can also tell by looking back to see how they're hanging and often reach back and feel them to see how firm they are.
  #82  
Old 02-28-2013, 01:22 PM
shovelracer shovelracer is offline
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Most cops maybe, but the ones with scales in the trunk do.
  #83  
Old 02-28-2013, 03:23 PM
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Duffster Duffster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridin' Green View Post
Sure they do. They know that last one means they can screw you if they want to.
Ain't that the truth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shovelracer View Post
Most cops maybe, but the ones with scales in the trunk do.
It's my understanding that the dumbest ones get stuck with the scales.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Oomkes
Your argument falls flatter than a 3 day old roadkill squirrel.
  #84  
Old 03-01-2013, 02:45 PM
dhardin53 dhardin53 is offline
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This topic always get some all in a huff. I hope what we can learn is what I said earlier. Each State had its own twist to Federal requirement.

The term "Commercial or need for Commercial drivers license and Commercial guide lines rules and weights very little State by state.

A basic rules all but a few exceptions of the north east states, as a LCO you do NOT fall within need of a Commercial CDL license or DOT #s is 1) your truck and trailer combined are under 26000 lbs. 2) the trailer is under 10000 lbs. 3) You Haul passengers or 4) hazardous materials.

LCO are not considered commercial operators unless you exceed the above 4 conditions or travel out of state regularly. Regardless if you in any business or not IF what you drive is over 26000 you will be required to have a commercial Plate. This is license plate, and fallow the same requirement within a commercial guide lines. It dos not require you to have a CDL in your wallet, but how many LCO are driving a Ford f550 for work or pleasure anyway. LCO are listed as a Maintenance vehicles. A kin to pool service, heating and cooling guys, pest control, electricians and the like.

The need for DOT # fall as a rule if you drive for hire (Commercial hauler) or like some of the small east cost states like Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut Delaware, New Jersey are pillaged with the INTERSTATE issue because it is easy or likely for you to drive out of your home state within a days work.

If the above is not confusing enough, many LCO do have a big truck, larger dual axle heavy trailers that need to know the laws effecting your work location. But to the few that do landscaping and drive and hale large loads. There is a NON CDL class A drivers license (Tractor trailer) Class B (tan-dum axle trucks) and Class C (Passenger cars and trucks). There are more and more landscapers pulling a 5th wheel dump trailer that will need a class A drivers license. But here is a example of are you in the business of hauler or business of landscaping. If you do more hauling and use the a 5th wheel on a regular bases you should look at a CDL class A.
  #85  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:05 PM
Ridin' Green Ridin' Green is offline
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Until June of last year here in Michigan if your GVWR of your truck was over 10,001, or a combination of your truck and trailer exceeded 10,001, you needed DOT numbers (which this thread is all about). That was changed with a new law last June and it is better for everyone. It's now far less of a chance of accidentally/temporarily going over the limit and getting fined. Less wasted money too. The wording is in the thread I started here on it.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darryl G
I can also tell by looking back to see how they're hanging and often reach back and feel them to see how firm they are.
  #86  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:25 PM
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Duffster Duffster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhardin53 View Post
This topic always get some all in a huff. I hope what we can learn is what I said earlier. Each State had its own twist to Federal requirement.

The term "Commercial or need for Commercial drivers license and Commercial guide lines rules and weights very little State by state.

A basic rules all but a few exceptions of the north east states, as a LCO you do NOT fall within need of a Commercial CDL license or DOT #s is 1) your truck and trailer combined are under 26000 lbs. 2) the trailer is under 10000 lbs. 3) You Haul passengers or 4) hazardous materials.

LCO are not considered commercial operators unless you exceed the above 4 conditions or travel out of state regularly. Regardless if you in any business or not IF what you drive is over 26000 you will be required to have a commercial Plate. This is license plate, and fallow the same requirement within a commercial guide lines. It dos not require you to have a CDL in your wallet, but how many LCO are driving a Ford f550 for work or pleasure anyway. LCO are listed as a Maintenance vehicles. A kin to pool service, heating and cooling guys, pest control, electricians and the like.

The need for DOT # fall as a rule if you drive for hire (Commercial hauler) or like some of the small east cost states like Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut Delaware, New Jersey are pillaged with the INTERSTATE issue because it is easy or likely for you to drive out of your home state within a days work.

If the above is not confusing enough, many LCO do have a big truck, larger dual axle heavy trailers that need to know the laws effecting your work location. But to the few that do landscaping and drive and hale large loads. There is a NON CDL class A drivers license (Tractor trailer) Class B (tan-dum axle trucks) and Class C (Passenger cars and trucks). There are more and more landscapers pulling a 5th wheel dump trailer that will need a class A drivers license. But here is a example of are you in the business of hauler or business of landscaping. If you do more hauling and use the a 5th wheel on a regular bases you should look at a CDL class A.
What a tandem load of.........misinformation.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Oomkes
Your argument falls flatter than a 3 day old roadkill squirrel.
  #87  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:42 PM
shovelracer shovelracer is offline
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I would not suggest that the laws are different because you regularly do something or only do it once. When your crossing into NJ from PA and pull in or other cases pass the weight station the state police aren't going to want to hear "well I only do this occasionally" and they certainly are not going to buy "well the lawnsite said it is OK".

The other thing that has me going on this thread is the interchange of CDL and Commercial. If you own a business you are commercial, period. Your state may not require a specific registration for business use, but you are still a commercial vehicle. This is totally separate from a Commercial Drivers License or CDL. Just because you are under 26K and do not need a CDL does not mean that "commercial" rules do not apply. Again may vary by state, but I can not imagine that your passenger auto policy is going to be excited if you have an issue with your commercial vehicle.

This thread is loaded with loads of misinformation, and there are lots of participants who have basically come right out and told everyone they are trying to find ways around the law. For what cause you do not want to put a few numbers on your truck or are too lazy to spend 30 minutes registering on the FMCSA site.

The best thing that could happen to this thread is for it to be closed.
  #88  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:46 PM
grandview (2006)'s Avatar
grandview (2006) grandview (2006) is offline
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Location: Lancaster N.Y.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhardin53 View Post
This topic always get some all in a huff. I hope what we can learn is what I said earlier. Each State had its own twist to Federal requirement.

The term "Commercial or need for Commercial drivers license and Commercial guide lines rules and weights very little State by state.

A basic rules all but a few exceptions of the north east states, as a LCO you do NOT fall within need of a Commercial CDL license or DOT #s is 1) your truck and trailer combined are under 26000 lbs. 2) the trailer is under 10000 lbs. 3) You Haul passengers or 4) hazardous materials.

LCO are not considered commercial operators unless you exceed the above 4 conditions or travel out of state regularly. Regardless if you in any business or not IF what you drive is over 26000 you will be required to have a commercial Plate. This is license plate, and fallow the same requirement within a commercial guide lines. It dos not require you to have a CDL in your wallet, but how many LCO are driving a Ford f550 for work or pleasure anyway. LCO are listed as a Maintenance vehicles. A kin to pool service, heating and cooling guys, pest control, electricians and the like.

The need for DOT # fall as a rule if you drive for hire (Commercial hauler) or like some of the small east cost states like Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut Delaware, New Jersey are pillaged with the INTERSTATE issue because it is easy or likely for you to drive out of your home state within a days work.

If the above is not confusing enough, many LCO do have a big truck, larger dual axle heavy trailers that need to know the laws effecting your work location. But to the few that do landscaping and drive and hale large loads. There is a NON CDL class A drivers license (Tractor trailer) Class B (tan-dum axle trucks) and Class C (Passenger cars and trucks). There are more and more landscapers pulling a 5th wheel dump trailer that will need a class A drivers license. But here is a example of are you in the business of hauler or business of landscaping. If you do more hauling and use the a 5th wheel on a regular bases you should look at a CDL class A.
Next time I get pulled over,I'll let them know they are wrong and you were right.
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  #89  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:51 PM
Duffster's Avatar
Duffster Duffster is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Midwest
Posts: 1,181
Quote:
Originally Posted by shovelracer View Post
I would not suggest that the laws are different because you regularly do something or only do it once. When your crossing into NJ from PA and pull in or other cases pass the weight station the state police aren't going to want to hear "well I only do this occasionally" and they certainly are not going to buy "well the lawnsite said it is OK".

The other thing that has me going on this thread is the interchange of CDL and Commercial. If you own a business you are commercial, period. Your state may not require a specific registration for business use, but you are still a commercial vehicle. This is totally separate from a Commercial Drivers License or CDL. Just because you are under 26K and do not need a CDL does not mean that "commercial" rules do not apply. Again may vary by state, but I can not imagine that your passenger auto policy is going to be excited if you have an issue with your commercial vehicle.

This thread is loaded with loads of misinformation, and there are lots of participants who have basically come right out and told everyone they are trying to find ways around the law. For what cause you do not want to put a few numbers on your truck or are too lazy to spend 30 minutes registering on the FMCSA site.

The best thing that could happen to this thread is for it to be closed.
The heap wasn't big enough so you thought you'd shovel some more on?
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Oomkes
Your argument falls flatter than a 3 day old roadkill squirrel.
  #90  
Old 03-01-2013, 04:54 PM
Michael J. Donovan's Avatar
Michael J. Donovan Michael J. Donovan is online now
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Posts: 2,441
ok, probably a good time to agree to disagree on this one...these types of things can vary from area to area, etc. and each can argue their side of things one way or the other, however, we don't need to attack anyone personally because of it

thanks
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