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Old 03-06-2013, 09:19 PM
LFD 1249 LFD 1249 is offline
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Chemical storage ideas?

What is the best way to store chemicals? I have a few ideas but I'm wanting to know what works for everybody else. I have a shop where I could store them. Would it be a good idea to add on and build designated area? Or build a complete seperate building just for chemicals to seperate it from the shop?
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Old 03-06-2013, 09:36 PM
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grandview (2006) grandview (2006) is online now
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How much are you storing ?
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:17 PM
LFD 1249 LFD 1249 is offline
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Well I'm not sure on the quanity. This will be my first year doing lawn treatments. No more than an area for 3 pallets I'm guessing
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:25 PM
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doug1980 doug1980 is offline
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Chemical storage ideas?

We store pallets of fertilizer and 55 gallon drums in the shop between our two lawn care trucks. All other chemicals are locked in a metal cabinet.
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:56 AM
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grandview (2006) grandview (2006) is online now
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In that case put in the corner of your shop.Ant liquids should be put in a tote or something in case of leaks and locked up.You might also have to call the fire dept to inform them you have chemicals and fertilizer on your property in case of a fire.
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:21 AM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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Your state law may have special requirements. Your storage should be lockable to prevent children and theives from access. Ideally, it should be protected from freezing. It should have adequate lighting. It should have good ventilation so that fumes can be blown out. Humidity low to prevent mold and rust of containers. Careful inventory to prevent theft, and fireproof with extinguisher, however if it is burning you must tell fire Dept what is inside and how much. No floor drains so that chemicals never flush to storm or sanitary sewers.

Perhaps a secondary containment system in case of container tip over or leak (perhaps a kiddy pool). What would happen if a container fell from a shelf? What would happen if the whole shelf system fell over? Ideally fert shoud be stored separate from herbicides, and seed seperate from herbicides. And seed protected from birds and rodents.

This brings to mind an incident at tru Green years ago. There was a full 30 gallon Trimec drum we wanted to move. It had been stored outside. As it was 5 above zero; it had frozen down to the ice on the pavement--we couldn't move it. That is until one of the guys got the lift truck. He couldn't grip it or get under it. He put one of the forks against the side of the drum about half-way up. He gunned the motor. The fork punched right through the metal drum. When he reversed, a huge stream of dark liquid gushed out.
Fortunately, it was only waste oil; still it was rather messy to clean up with sand and dirt.

And another incident. A local elevator sold lawn care fert and bulk fert and many chemicals and pesticides. On the night of the fourth of July 13 years ago lightining struck--setting the 60 foot tall wooden building on fire. The small town fire dept couldn't do much. Fortunately most (not all) the chemicals were stored in a fairly new cement block building a hundred feet away. The cost to demolish the remains, and dispose of tons of half-burned fert contaminated with various odd colored chemicals was very high. Government officials from various agencies were on site for weeks.
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:01 PM
LFD 1249 LFD 1249 is offline
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Thanks for the advice. I think I'm going to put up a small structure behind my shop on a concrete slab. This way if something happens my shop won't be burnt down. I'm going to invest in some metal cabinets that totes will fit in so liquids will be in a climate controlled environment.
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Old 03-08-2013, 11:42 AM
TurfWerks TurfWerks is offline
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Might wanna think about some way to keep your liquids from freezing when your building.. I store mine in a 10x15 shed and use a small electric radiator heater to keep them warm.
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