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  #1  
Old 05-11-2013, 12:39 AM
Mikegyver Mikegyver is offline
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Explaining head to head spacing to customers

How do you explain head to head spacing to customers when they ask? Like "Why are all 4 heads watering the same spot?" (I.e. the middle of the 4 heads) or "That area is getting watered too much because its being hit by all of those heads"
I wanted to say, that's because I designed it right, but I kept my mouth shut.
Any thoughts on this?
Mike
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Old 05-11-2013, 02:38 AM
stebs stebs is offline
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Maybe sketch it out on paper and show them the spots that don't get water if you didn't do head to head spacing??
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Old 05-11-2013, 04:08 AM
Stillwater Stillwater is offline
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You can start by explaining to your customer your goal in the design is to obtain 100% coverage not head to head spacing. The method( but not always) Mostlikely to achieve that goal is placing heads so they water head to head. On some locations head to head doesn't automatically mean you will have 100% coverage. so a good design is what's important not head to head.
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Old 05-11-2013, 11:45 PM
jcr4au jcr4au is offline
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I tells the customer heads are designed from the manufacture to spray to one another typically in a square or triangle layout. To not have head to head coverage causes them to be inefficient if not useless. If they need a system with a non-head to head design then I let them know I am not the guy to hire.
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Old 05-12-2013, 10:26 AM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcr4au View Post
I tells the customer heads are designed from the manufacture to spray to one another typically in a square or triangle layout. To not have head to head coverage causes them to be inefficient if not useless. If they need a system with a non-head to head design then I let them know I am not the guy to hire.
It's really about uniformity of distribution, and how a head-to-head arrangement can maximize it, which, in turn, can lower watering costs.
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Old 05-12-2013, 11:45 AM
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CAPT Stream Rotar CAPT Stream Rotar is offline
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use words like
uniformity
distribution rate
precip rate /MPR
GPM/psi
explain all these things and if they don't get it tell them to come here we can set them straight.
I love using the reference " well hell, you can put a very large sprinkler head on top of the roof and call it a day"

good luck..
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Old 05-12-2013, 12:15 PM
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Mike Leary Mike Leary is offline
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You also would be advised to explain "the dough nut syndrome", which can be caused by lack of head-to-head coverage, as well as lack of gpm/psi. I do believe Rain-Bird designed the 5000 series rotors w/MPR nozzles to front-load more aggressively, knowing most contractors could not do a proper design or use a tape measure.
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Old 05-12-2013, 12:42 PM
Stillwater Stillwater is offline
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Yep their is a lot of head scratching when ever theirs a tape measure involved.
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Old 05-12-2013, 12:56 PM
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1idejim 1idejim is offline
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As long as you are in the education mode, explain that systems get weaker not stronger as they grow older. That means head to head may in a few years be less than optimum, therefore you design and regulate accordingly.
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Old 05-12-2013, 02:11 PM
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mitchgo mitchgo is offline
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Just say it's right and that a properly designed system needs each head to hit the next head in line for a nice uniform coverage.

Nozzle swap!
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