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  #11  
Old 05-19-2013, 10:46 PM
Bigred350 Bigred350 is offline
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It would be best to take it apart and dry everything. There's a good chance the brushes,magnet,and bearings will rust up pretty quick. I would take it to a electric motor shop and have them look over it before I put power to it.
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Old 05-19-2013, 11:09 PM
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londonrain londonrain is offline
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The bearings will be shot in a short time....
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Old 05-20-2013, 01:06 AM
stebs stebs is offline
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I can promise you one thing, if it were me, I wouldn't be anywhere near it when it got powered up the first time!
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Old 05-20-2013, 12:37 PM
tonyvol tonyvol is offline
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Originally Posted by stebs View Post
I can promise you one thing, if it were me, I wouldn't be anywhere near it when it got powered up the first time!
I took it to a pump repair place by me. The guy said that he will put it in the oven and bake. He said as long as I didn't put power to it, it should be ok. Hope he is right. Thanks guys for the advice.
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Old 05-20-2013, 08:50 PM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyvol View Post
Sounds like a good idea. I guess you would need some type of flexible pipe to allow the supply line to rise with the float? Do they make such as thing? I needed to have a short suction line for the pump to work with my irrigation system. If I knew that we were going to get so much rain, I would have unhooked the pump and moved it to higher ground. Oh well. The water level in this lake doesn't normally rise this much, but this is what happens when you get 6 in. of rain in less than 6 hrs. First time if 15 yrs. that it has gone over the dock.
Sure there is flex pipe you can use. Spiral-reinforced PVC flex tubing works on both suction and (depending on system pressures) outlet.
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Old 05-21-2013, 01:36 AM
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1idejim 1idejim is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyvol View Post
I took it to a pump repair place by me. The guy said that he will put it in the oven and bake. He said as long as I didn't put power to it, it should be ok. Hope he is right. Thanks guys for the advice.
I have worked on lots of pool pumps that have been submerged for one reason or another.

The bearings are either sealed or ceramic and the motors are meant for wet locations.

I personally don't think you will have any problems.
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