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  #21  
Old 06-21-2013, 05:03 PM
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weeze weeze is offline
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i don't think anyone said it can't happen. it's just not very likely as long as you know the limits of the machine you are operating and drive it with common sense.

i've seen alot of guys mow and they always look like they are in a hurry and driving reckless and so forth. it's the same way when people drive cars that way. they are the ones most likely to have a wreck of some type. if you drive defensively and aren't trying to mow hills that you know are too steep and such then you shouldn't have to worry about it. common sense goes a long way. it's just most people these days no longer have much of it.
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  #22  
Old 06-21-2013, 05:36 PM
hi_speedreed hi_speedreed is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonhc73 View Post
Has anyone ever seen a ztr roll over? I looked all over the u tube and didn't come up with much. ZTR Roll over only showed one accident that was a real accident that a ROBS could have helped, the accident however could have still been avoided. Other than people blatantly exceeding safety standards, I think it's extremely difficult to actually tip a ztr over.

From a purely CG point of view, more weight up high makes anything more tippy. Put it down or just take it off. Down means even more stability, off means less weight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by weeze View Post
the tires will slip and slide on a steep slope before the mower flips over when mowing sideways on a hill. i really don't see how you could flip over unless you just can't operate a ztr very well. i've even popped wheelies going up steep hills but you just let off on the levers a bit and lean forward and the front end goes back down. even if you kept going back the rear bumper would hit the ground and keep it from going all the way over i would guess. you'd have to really force the levers at full force all the way forward on a steep hill to get it to flip all the way over backwards. anyways this should never happen if you can operate a ztr properly.

it's good to keep it on and just leave it down if it's designed like the deere rops. it folds all the way down out of the way and acts like a barrier for the back end of the mower for protection. it's got a bumper back there and then the rops wrapped around too which comes in handy to protect the back end from hitting things like trees or whatever when backing up. it's also a good place to hook up a tow rope to to pull your ztr out of a ditch if the need arises.
These two posts question the validity of a roll over. I posted many links to roll overs causing death. Not all of these were from operating on a hill. In fact one of the pictures show a flat operating zone next to a retaining wall. The point was to show it can and does happen. It does not have to happen on a hill. If one wheel hits mud and suddenly only one wheel has traction, it will cause you to pivot on the wheel that lost traction. I would bet that is the cause of the accidents where the person was operating on a flat surface and went over a retaining wall.
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  #23  
Old 06-21-2013, 11:21 PM
orangemower orangemower is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hi_speedreed View Post
These two posts question the validity of a roll over. I posted many links to roll overs causing death. Not all of these were from operating on a hill. In fact one of the pictures show a flat operating zone next to a retaining wall. The point was to show it can and does happen. It does not have to happen on a hill. If one wheel hits mud and suddenly only one wheel has traction, it will cause you to pivot on the wheel that lost traction. I would bet that is the cause of the accidents where the person was operating on a flat surface and went over a retaining wall.
I see this as going past the comfort zone. Even on a flat surface, I'd be using a wb to trim the edge of the wall.
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  #24  
Old 06-22-2013, 09:25 AM
farmmower farmmower is offline
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Accidents

Having been a paramedic years ago and in the business for 30 years I would say many accidents that don't involve substance abuse are well meaning, intense people who are particular about their job and try to get a little closer to whatever "edge" their profession entails.

I read the posted accident accounts here and now that I am using my own 61" commercial mower I can see how I can tend to get closer to edges each time. I do use the ROPES and seat belt near my ditches/slopes. I just have to remind myself that if I get concerned about a rollover then I'm too steep, too close to edge, etc. It is common sense but some people have a tendency to take seemingly small risks. It might even be an employee who tries to impress the boss by how little he leaves for the trimmer, etc.
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  #25  
Old 06-22-2013, 09:39 AM
farmmower farmmower is offline
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One other example of how accidents can happen is a case in CO a few years back. A surgeon was using his snowblower when it became jammed with wet snow. His after action report stated that as he reached into the machine to clear the snow he realized his mistake immediately but it was too late and he lost some fingers. Probably had to change specialties. If we are alive and could go back and look at our mistakes whether driving a car or any other potentially dangerous activity we would probably say that was a dumb mistake but smart and experienced people still make them. Like one of the posts said, even though he had never had a car accident he still wears his seat belt. We are humans and not programmed with minuses and zeroes.
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  #26  
Old 06-22-2013, 10:13 AM
twomancrew twomancrew is offline
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Toro gave me a free ROPS for the old Z200, GAVE it to me. I hated it and never used it. I had that mower for years first and the change of balance really threw me off. Then last year I bought a new Toro Z and it came with the ROPS. I took it off and a week later a farmer rolled his Z into a ditch as he was mowing along his driveway. Killed him. I just ggogled "mow roll death" and added the name of our local paper to that and I found 4 since 2007 with that crappy search including the man last year. Anyway I wear mine. It is a hassle to put up and down but I feel it is time well spent. Also I totally though that it threw the weight off on the old Z200. Well I piut the ROPS on it last year as well and since I was learning the new Toro the old Z200 didn't seem as bad as I remembered. I say give yourself a chance and put it on, wear the seat belt. If you wanna compare balls then bring your Z and we go find a hill and hang out for awhile. I got balls of steel FYI. Probably got rocks for brains tho
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  #27  
Old 06-22-2013, 11:49 AM
dhardin53 dhardin53 is offline
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I understand and believe ROP are a great life saving device. Having said that I personally feel it gives the operator a heightened if not false sense of security. The feeling of being protected will cause too many people to take chances one would not normally.

Driving a ZTR off the trailer with the top bar folded back for even the flattest property is just another pet pev of mine. Also not wearing a seat belt if you has a ROP or without. If you buy or this type if safety devices and are not religiously in daily use, then what is the point. Accidents will and can happen all the time any where. Ok it is smart to stop and put up the ROP and click the seat belt when your working on hills and around dangers obstacles. But your only decreasing your odds in a small degree. I feel I take the time not having ROP or set belts to deliberately NOT put myself near a potential accident. But I see guys with ROPs do things I would never do. (even if I had ROP).

I would like to here some real life stories of ROP getting in the way and causing damage, fiscal and financial when using ROP. I know of 3 guy locally that use to love there ROP till they had to fix what they have destroyed with them.
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  #28  
Old 06-22-2013, 12:52 PM
farmmower farmmower is offline
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It has caused me to trim a few low lying branches that could be broken off by the ROPEs or watch how I approach certain trees.
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  #29  
Old 06-22-2013, 06:46 PM
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Snyder's Lawn Inc Snyder's Lawn Inc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhardin53 View Post
I understand and believe ROP are a great life saving device. Having said that I personally feel it gives the operator a heightened if not false sense of security. The feeling of being protected will cause too many people to take chances one would not normally.

Driving a ZTR off the trailer with the top bar folded back for even the flattest property is just another pet pev of mine. Also not wearing a seat belt if you has a ROP or without. If you buy or this type if safety devices and are not religiously in daily use, then what is the point. Accidents will and can happen all the time any where. Ok it is smart to stop and put up the ROP and click the seat belt when your working on hills and around dangers obstacles. But your only decreasing your odds in a small degree. I feel I take the time not having ROP or set belts to deliberately NOT put myself near a potential accident. But I see guys with ROPs do things I would never do. (even if I had ROP).

I would like to here some real life stories of ROP getting in the way and causing damage, fiscal and financial when using ROP. I know of 3 guy locally that use to love there ROP till they had to fix what they have destroyed with them.
My City pool has a water line to fill the pool and it runs above ground between 2 hills
City owned Dixie Choppers and the guy was going at least full speed with ROP up and stuck under it . They had cut the ROP off to get mower unstuck.
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  #30  
Old 06-22-2013, 11:05 PM
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Kelly's Landscaping Kelly's Landscaping is offline
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That's an interesting set of links you have there. What I didn't see was landscapers dying. You had 3 guys that were ages 67 69 and 70 one of them was towing a trailer with his mower. You had a golf course worker. And the rest seemed to be all city employees. There was just one case of a young guy and they gave no details about the accident. This is always tragic but I am an adult and will make my own choices.
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