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Old 07-18-2013, 02:00 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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Surfactant at high rates and temperature

I tested a non-ionic surfactant (Bonide Turbo spreader sticker), at high and low rates during a hot spell, 94 degree days as high temps. I applied with a hand sprayer on a fine fescue Kentucky bluegrass mixture in light shade. I applied an equivalent of 2.3 gallons of solution per thousand sqft.
I applied at the rate of about 1, 1.4, 2, and 8 percent.

There was no injury to the grass.

It appears to me that a non-ionic surfactant can be safely used even at high rates, and even in hot weather.

What is your experience?
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Old 07-18-2013, 02:46 PM
vaacutabove vaacutabove is online now
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I spotted a few yards this year with Li 700 to much with my T3000. Was a mix of speed zone 1.5 oz per K and 16-20 oz of LI per 16 gal. There is a thread here with pics it won't let me repost. I have since changed to a generic sticker spreader and still at 1.5 and no issues same yards. backing down now due to heat. to 1.3 oz SZ.
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Old 07-18-2013, 03:10 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
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I have used water based nonionic surfactant, not spreader sticker at up to 1/2 oz per gallon of mixed solution with most herbicides and not had any additional burn. On most weeds, not using some kind of surfactant such as nonionic or MSO is a cause of treatment failure.
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Old 07-19-2013, 08:12 PM
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Riggle,
i get some turfgrass yellowing by using 80/20 on bermuda/zoysia. It is faint but is removed by mowing. This is with spot spraying and not by blanket treatments. If so, it is so faint that it is considered dry stress.
I can't speak for the tttf, rye,kbg fellow lco's.
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Old 07-19-2013, 08:16 PM
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10 seconds later. Fine, Green. But what is 80/20?
If it is a surfactant what was the concentration? Temp? Herbicide?
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Old 07-20-2013, 12:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
I tested a non-ionic surfactant (Bonide Turbo spreader sticker), at high and low rates during a hot spell, 94 degree days as high temps. I applied with a hand sprayer on a fine fescue Kentucky bluegrass mixture in light shade. I applied an equivalent of 2.3 gallons of solution per thousand sqft.
I applied at the rate of about 1, 1.4, 2, and 8 percent.

There was no injury to the grass.

It appears to me that a non-ionic surfactant can be safely used even at high rates, and even in hot weather.

What is your experience?
So it sounds like I could spray broad leaf and CG in fescue kentucky bluegrass at lower mix rate above 90 degree temps with a spreader sticker?? And not have damage to the lawn??
Thanks
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Old 07-20-2013, 07:57 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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surfactant heat

Opinion. I think, yes, you can use surfactant at high temps.

I also used herbicides at 90 degrees, but you should be very cautious, if you are not following directions. Your conditions and grass species are probably different from mine. Do a small area at first.

I think triclopyr may be slightly more risky at high temps, but our high temps are gone for the time being. T-zone has triclopyr which is not labeled for Bermuda, for instance.

Naturally, be careful with spot spraying, as it is difficult to apply the proper amount--accurate calibration and application are much less likely.

See Thinkgreen's comments about spot spraying Bermuda/zoysia.

Last edited by RigglePLC; 07-20-2013 at 07:59 PM. Reason: add
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:37 AM
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80/20 surfactant by Drexel.
Ingredients:
Principal functioning agent: alkyl polyoxyethlene ethers: 80%
Constitutes ineffective as spray adjuvant: 20%

backpack.............0.16 ounces per gallon or 1 pint per 100 gallons.
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