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  #1  
Old 07-30-2013, 02:30 AM
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mitchgo mitchgo is offline
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1/4 drip line on cement patio

I need to install drip line to several pots around a stamped concrete patio with no access underneath.

This is a contemporary house that's roughly 75% all window's so the drip needs to be flawless.

Typically we install 1/2 conduit strapped in with molly anchors , then running drip packs to the pots. Making it hidden as possible or what ever the situation may be of course the goal is to make it as clean as possible. Anyways 1/2" is out of the question

I'll be installing my main piping around this 25' x 80 ' patio and installing drip to each pot. There's a multi tiered water feature in the middle of this so I was able to sneak several drip lines under the rocks to gain access to the middle of the patio. Which helps from running drip from the outside of the patio to the middle. There are no arbors that I can run up and over

Basically, do you guys have any well known products for keeping 1/4 drip straight?

So far my idea's are 1/4" wire strap and molly anchor every few feet, Small sections of double sided sticky tape and also small dabs of super glue. I'm not sure how weather effects the last 2

Suggestions, ideas?
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  #2  
Old 07-30-2013, 08:40 AM
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Wet_Boots Wet_Boots is online now
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How many emitters are you planning to feed from a single tube? Best practice is one emitter tube for one dripper.
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  #3  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:07 AM
windflower windflower is offline
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Hydraulic cement sticks well to masonry (get it wet first) and pops off cleanly if you need to remove it. I use it as glue to stick copper anchors on brick walls for plant support.
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Old 07-30-2013, 09:35 AM
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Can you core drill under the pots Mitch?

That would be the cleanest way i can think of.
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  #5  
Old 07-30-2013, 10:18 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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I agree with Jim, and will note this. Whatever you do Mitch, keep in mind these pots are not necessarily a permanent feature, so however you decide to run your line you should try to avoid anything that is permanent (i.e. molly anchors may not be the best option here).
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiril View Post
I agree with Jim, and will note this. Whatever you do Mitch, keep in mind these pots are not necessarily a permanent feature, so however you decide to run your line you should try to avoid anything that is permanent (i.e. molly anchors may not be the best option here).
I agree with Chief and for the record view sites such as these, products of piss poor planning and preparation.
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Old 07-30-2013, 10:56 AM
Kiril Kiril is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1idejim View Post
I agree with Chief and for the record view sites such as these, products of piss poor planning and preparation.
Yes. If there is any potential for patio pots, then a sleeve should be run to a 6" round.
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:23 PM
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mitchgo mitchgo is offline
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6" spacing 0.5gph 1/4" drip line does wonders for using 1/4 drip tubing and multi pots.

There's no way to drill under the pots as there is no access under the cement.

Windflower do you have a link to a product for hydraulic cement?
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:39 PM
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hydraulic cement is a mix-it-yourself powder - you can always find it if you ask for it by name - it has the property of expanding as it sets, so it is a great choice for a pipe set in a masonry wall below grade
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  #10  
Old 07-30-2013, 09:47 PM
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greenmonster304 greenmonster304 is online now
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Might not be the best for this application but I have used dumdum to stick 1/4 drip under the tread overhang on stone steps and in other precarious locations where nails and screws won't work.
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