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  #1  
Old 09-19-2013, 09:55 PM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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Landscaping Options for Eroding Hill

Hey guys,
(see pictures)
A client of mine has a property where the back yard is sloping towards their house. A lot of the back yard is eroded and its pretty bad. Hard to mow, and some small dry stream beds. It is shady also and the grass is not doing well. They are leaning towards mulching at least some of the area.
Off the top of my head I was thinking to try and re grade, perhaps with a dingo, or the like and create some channels for the water to flow, maybe with river rock or something similar. There are some sick and ugly trees which some of them will be removed and others trimmed I am guessing.

Do you all have any ideas, mainly for the water / erosion issues?
thanks
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  #2  
Old 09-20-2013, 04:57 AM
Coffeecraver Coffeecraver is offline
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Create a mulch area around the trees
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Norm's Landscape
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  #3  
Old 09-20-2013, 08:25 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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Thanks.
Right between those 2 trees is the worst run off stream. Its very eroded there and it might just wash the mulch away. Im trying to figure out a way to manage the runoff / erosion that looks nice.
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Old 09-20-2013, 10:58 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Dress up the area with stone... Even if all the stone you use is the 1.5 inch river rock in the dry stream washouts... That is about the only thing that won't wash away and it can even be under the mulch...

But beyond that, you are looking at 'rock garden' that is simple and cheap, or something that is as extravagant as your imagination... your idea of diverting water in various directions is a good one... I'd play with that idea for a while before I jump into it...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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Old 09-20-2013, 09:11 PM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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Yea, went over there today and noticed the customer has a lot of his neighbors water running into his yard. They are above him on a hill, so their water washes into his lawn. We are thinking to put a swale or dry well at the top of the hill running parallel to the picture (not going down the hill) and divert the water to the edges of the yard and see if that helps. Then a lot of mulching / ground covers and landscape shrubs and small trees.
Any ideas are still welcome,
thanks
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  #6  
Old 09-21-2013, 08:58 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is online now
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Trying to stop it dead in its tracks never works well,,, slowing it down, dispersing over a larger area while not letting it accumulate will be your best advantage... Working with the neighbor will be the biggest challenge... Spring thaw will tell the story, so let us know how it goes...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #7  
Old 09-21-2013, 09:06 AM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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ok thanks I will keep updated
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  #8  
Old 09-22-2013, 02:07 PM
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andersman02 andersman02 is offline
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We just did a job very simular to yours.

Cut down grass real low, sprayed glyphosate in the bed area, planted right into soil around roots, Used boulders to help with erosion and planted about 60 plants. Customer was very happy with the outcome



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  #9  
Old 09-22-2013, 08:23 PM
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StackLawn StackLawn is offline
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Have you thought of a ground cover such as pachysandra or Joseph's coat within a large bed? Not being able to walk the land, it may be necessary to add a french drain as well. Of course if the homeowner has a larger budget, adding tiers to the yard may work out best. Your original thought on adding a mulch bed is also a good idea, especially in densely shaded areas. I know that others on this thread have excellent ideas too.
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  #10  
Old 09-22-2013, 08:46 PM
recycledsole recycledsole is online now
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I am trying to stay away from invasive ground covers. Ill be researching native ground covers and such hopefully the customer will like it. thanks stacklawn
The flowerbed looks nice andersman. Boulders could be a good idea.
waiting to hear back from the customer as the family makes their mind up on how many trees they want taken down, etc...
THANKS!
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