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  #21  
Old 09-22-2013, 10:46 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snyder's Lawn Inc View Post
Not mocking I want to hear more about your corn meal
What kind of results you had with corn meal???

Never to young to learn something new
Sorry about that...

I've never had fungal issue myself,,, rather this is what I've heard from a number of legitimate sites and it makes sense to give it a try... dchall for exa.,,, has plenty of experience with it...
I don't know if he's here anymore...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
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  #22  
Old 09-22-2013, 03:27 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArTurf View Post
For those of you who maintain a lot of St Aug and your conditions favor Brown Patch at certain times of the year (spring & fall in my area) what is your approach to preventing it and treating it. Wait until you start seeing it? (then your a little behind, right?) Of course following proper practices-excessive water, N at wrong time & etc. But if it tends to rear its head despite this what is your approach? I have many lawns with a lot of trees and at times of the year the grass will stay wet with dew or irrigation well into the day, 10 hrs+
Under those conditions, then the grass should be on the 21 day program. With alternating fungicides. I cannot imagine fungicides costing more than grass replacement. If the grass stays wet after irrigation, maybe the lawn should not be irrigated as often.
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  #23  
Old 09-22-2013, 03:39 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snyder's Lawn Inc View Post
Not mocking I want to hear more about your corn meal
What kind of results you had with corn meal???

Never to young to learn something new

Cornmeal has been to be effective here in Texas and is used by many people. However, from my understand of the breakdown if you already apply Fungicide the cornmeal will not be effective. I applied it on White Mildew looking spots we wee having in the early morning time which I believe was from too much water while establishing turf. You can call me crazy, it might not even have nothing to do with the corn meal, but I can tell you that all the white spots are completely gone.
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  #24  
Old 09-22-2013, 03:41 PM
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BlazersandWildcats2009 BlazersandWildcats2009 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Under those conditions, then the grass should be on the 21 day program. With alternating fungicides. I cannot imagine fungicides costing more than grass replacement. If the grass stays wet after irrigation, maybe the lawn should not be irrigated as often.
Maybe Greendoctor, could shed some light on the issue with applying fungicides and corn meal both? From my understanding the organic corn meal won't be effective after using fungicide chemicals. But as far as results, many people across our state use Corn Meal.
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  #25  
Old 09-22-2013, 04:13 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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The only thing tangible I can see in the cornmeal is the nutrient content. Now there are theories out there about bringing in and fostering competing microorganisms. Not saying it will not work. But, if the basis of using cornmeal is encouraging competing fungal species, then fungicides might not be a good idea. Depending on the fungicide. The totally broad spectrum products such as chlorthalonil, copper, or mancozeb might be the worst in this aspect. Most of the fungicides available now for use on residential lawns are very specific to which fungal species they affect.

Personally, I am resigned to the fact and truthful with myself that mowed grass is anything but natural.
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  #26  
Old 09-22-2013, 04:29 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazersandWildcats2009 View Post
Cornmeal has been to be effective here in Texas and is used by many people. However, from my understand of the breakdown if you already apply Fungicide the cornmeal will not be effective. I applied it on White Mildew looking spots we wee having in the early morning time which I believe was from too much water while establishing turf. You can call me crazy, it might not even have nothing to do with the corn meal, but I can tell you that all the white spots are completely gone.
Did you reduce the watering when you noticed the white mildew? I do not look for things to spread or spray when there is a problem with a lawn. I think about mowing, watering, fertilization, light levels, temperature, and humidity.
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  #27  
Old 09-22-2013, 08:42 PM
Skipster Skipster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazersandWildcats2009 View Post
Cornmeal has been to be effective here in Texas and is used by many people. However, from my understand of the breakdown if you already apply Fungicide the cornmeal will not be effective. I applied it on White Mildew looking spots we wee having in the early morning time which I believe was from too much water while establishing turf. You can call me crazy, it might not even have nothing to do with the corn meal, but I can tell you that all the white spots are completely gone.
What is white mildew? The Compendium of Turfgrass Diseases doesn't have a 'white mildew' entry and I've never heard of it in my 32 years in the turf industry. There is a 'white patch', 'white leaf', and 'powdery mildew', but not a 'white mildew.' Maybe if you have a scientific name to match it with, the rest of us will know what you're talking about. Once we know for sure what disease you were seeing, we'll know for sure if excessive water at the time of establishment has something to do with it.

This is what I was talking about earlier. Often, anything that is not green grass and is not a weed gets labeled as some disease, whether it is or not, then guys talk about using totally off-base methods in an attempt to deal with this problem. A dead giveaway that a guy doesn't know what he's dealing with and that he won't solve his problem is when he can't identify the disease, doesn't know what conditions lead to its development (Hint: overwatering isn't specific enough), doesn't know what symptoms to look for, and can't even call it by the right name.

Did cornmeal solve the problem, or did your application simply coincide with the event that did solve the problem? Remember, people used to think that maggots were caused by rotting meat, simply because when they saw one, they saw the other. They didn't know enough to understand that maggots were fly larvae. Kind of like applying cornmeal to an unknown issue, then the issue is gone.
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  #28  
Old 09-23-2013, 07:47 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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The following is what we are experiencing right now... We exist in high tree populations overlooking lakes and swamps... it is common for both Spring and Fall and goes away in a week or so, on average...

http://plantscience.psu.edu/research...powdery-mildew
"...The causal organism overwinters in dead grass and in infected living grass plants. Spores of the fungus spread by wind to leaves of other turfgrass plants. Conditions favorable for powdery mildew development include poor air circulation, high atmospheric humidity (but no free water on the leaf surfaces), low light intensity or shade, and cool air temperatures. Kentucky bluegrass, when planted in shaded areas, is particularly susceptible to this disease. ..."
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #29  
Old 09-23-2013, 08:02 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
What is white mildew? The Compendium of Turfgrass Diseases doesn't have a 'white mildew' entry and I've never heard of it in my 32 years in the turf industry. There is a 'white patch', 'white leaf', and 'powdery mildew', but not a 'white mildew.' Maybe if you have a scientific name to match it with, the rest of us will know what you're talking about. Once we know for sure what disease you were seeing, we'll know for sure if excessive water at the time of establishment has something to do with it.

This is what I was talking about earlier. Often, anything that is not green grass and is not a weed gets labeled as some disease, whether it is or not, then guys talk about using totally off-base methods in an attempt to deal with this problem. A dead giveaway that a guy doesn't know what he's dealing with and that he won't solve his problem is when he can't identify the disease, doesn't know what conditions lead to its development (Hint: overwatering isn't specific enough), doesn't know what symptoms to look for, and can't even call it by the right name.

Did cornmeal solve the problem, or did your application simply coincide with the event that did solve the problem? Remember, people used to think that maggots were caused by rotting meat, simply because when they saw one, they saw the other. They didn't know enough to understand that maggots were fly larvae. Kind of like applying cornmeal to an unknown issue, then the issue is gone.
A common denominator for all species of Fungal Pathogens is Poor Drainage... It refers to the Habitat of Pathogenic Fungi, in general... Much like one would speak of general habitat for snakes, salamanders or toads... there are many similarities in which it would be common to look for toads, while it is not surprising to find a snake or salamander in the same habit... While they would all hang out under leaves they would never hide in a dry manicured lawn...
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Now that I know that clay's texture(platelets) has nothing to do with water infiltration, percolation, or drainage
,,, I wonder what does...
*
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  #30  
Old 09-23-2013, 08:12 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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This is the "White Patch" disease that has little white mushrooms growing right on the leaf and appears more under malnourished water stressed turf when the weather is humid... Not necessarily caused by a 'drainage issue',,, instead assumes dry soil that may be a little too dry for too long a time...

http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/Diseases/White_Patch.aspx
"... White patch, also known as white blight, is primarily a disease of tall fescue in transition zone areas. The disease develops during periods of hot, humid weather and is most damaging to new plantings in the first year or two after establishment. Symptoms appear in white circles or patches up to 1 foot in diameter, and small white or tan mushrooms (about 1/4 inch in diameter) are produced directly on the blighted leaves. White patch is most damaging in tall fescue that is under-irrigated or deficient in nitrogen or other essential nutrients. ..."
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