Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 10-09-2013, 07:31 AM
gulfjoe's Avatar
gulfjoe gulfjoe is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Columbus GA
Posts: 996
Quote:
Originally Posted by avguy View Post
Joe I'm a homeowner like yourself and relied on the great advice of several members here. When I moved to our home 7 yrs ago the lawn was pathetic with a 4.9 soil PH. I spent 2 years amending the soil before I even tried to seed.
I had to add lime @ 150/lbs/k over a 2 year period.

Here is my current fert schedule provided by Lesco:

March: 19-0-6 Dimension 3.8 lbs/k
May: 19-0-6 Dimension 3.8 lbs/k
June: 32-3-8 3.1 lbs/k
July 32-3-8 3.1 lbs/k
August 32-3-8 3.1 lbs/k
September 5-0-17 Dimension

I have 2 acres of seeded common Bermuda that looks pretty good. Also, I have the 80lb Lesco spreader but would advise you to look at the 50lb spreader as the 80lb gets pretty heavey to push when full.

I don't know if this will help you or not. Good luck!
Here was my orginal soil test when i bought my home. This was Late january 2012.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=369190
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 10-09-2013, 11:42 AM
Skipster Skipster is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulfjoe View Post
I use their Lesco products so I guess i need to go out and buy a Lesco spreader. I have seen a few on CL, but I haven't really seen a good deal. I guess I will just have to pick up the next one I see.
You don't have to buy a Lesco spreader -- any working spreader will do. All you have to do is calibrate it. Simply:

1) Weigh out some amount (any amount you want) in a bucket. If you don't have a scale that can weigh out 10# or so, stand on your bathroom scale and weigh yourself with the empty bucket and with the full bucket.

2) Measure out a length (at least 20 ft, just to give you some room) in your driveway.

3) Put weighed amount of fert into spreader and run over this length with gate open.

4) Measure the width of the spread swath (how far left and right it threw the fert). Multiply this by the length to get the area you covered.

5) Dump the remaining fert in the spreader back into your bucket, step on the scale, and subtract it from your weight with the full bucket from when you started. This tells you how much you used.

Now, you have the weight of fert you used over the square footage of the area. Using these numbers, you can calculate how much fert your spreader puts out and adjust it up or down accordingly. Just remember to sweep the fert up off the driveway (put it back in the spreader) and enjoy fertilizing your lawn!
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 10-09-2013, 08:33 PM
RigglePLC's Avatar
RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Grand Rapids MI
Posts: 9,317
Skip is right.
You don't have to empty the fert into a bucket to weigh yourself each time. Lift up the spreader and step onto the scale. Of course, now you can't see the numbers; get your wife to read the dial.

If you cannot get a helpful person the read the dial...lift the spreader behind you at the small of your back...also difficult. Need to be a contortionist. You will find a way to weigh it.
Readjust until you apply the correct rate three times in a row. Remember with a rotary spreader, the outer edges of the pattern are thinner; this allows for a 30 percent overlap. Plan on about a 7 or 8 foot swath width.
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 10-10-2013, 05:54 AM
gulfjoe's Avatar
gulfjoe gulfjoe is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Columbus GA
Posts: 996
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
Bermuda does better at a soil pH between 6-7. You do need the high calcium lime. No dolomite. Also, why 28-0-3? On bermuda, I like to see 14 or more potassium, especially in areas with short growing seasons. Potassium helps with cold hardiness. Potassium also helps with root and stolon development. I know I apply close to 1/2 lb K per 1000 every application. Not doing that causes me problems concerning how long the grass can go between irrigation and thinness of the turf.
Having trouble finding lime that is not Dolomite... I am going to call a few other places.
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 10-10-2013, 10:52 AM
Skipster Skipster is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 715
There's nothing wrong with dolomitic lime -- its still going to do the job you need it to.

The biggest difference between dolomitic lime and calcitic lime is that the dolomitic source has Mg, but the calcitic source does not. If you need more Mg, dolomitic lime can help you with that. If you already have enough Mg, dolomitic lime isn't going to hurt.

You just don't want to pay for nutrient you don't need. If you have a choice between calcitic and dolomitic, take the cheaper one. If a dolomite is all you can find, have at it!

BTW, follow the liming recommendation on your soil test. All grasses prefer slightly acidic soils. Ideal pH is between 5.5 and 6.5, and you're test is not far from that. Keep in mind, too, that a pH change usually takes a while -- you won't make it happen in a couple applications, or even a couple of seasons. You'll probably have to lime for a few years to acheive an ideal pH range.
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 10-10-2013, 11:01 AM
gulfjoe's Avatar
gulfjoe gulfjoe is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Columbus GA
Posts: 996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipster View Post
There's nothing wrong with dolomitic lime -- its still going to do the job you need it to.

The biggest difference between dolomitic lime and calcitic lime is that the dolomitic source has Mg, but the calcitic source does not. If you need more Mg, dolomitic lime can help you with that. If you already have enough Mg, dolomitic lime isn't going to hurt.

You just don't want to pay for nutrient you don't need. If you have a choice between calcitic and dolomitic, take the cheaper one. If a dolomite is all you can find, have at it!

BTW, follow the liming recommendation on your soil test. All grasses prefer slightly acidic soils. Ideal pH is between 5.5 and 6.5, and you're test is not far from that. Keep in mind, too, that a pH change usually takes a while -- you won't make it happen in a couple applications, or even a couple of seasons. You'll probably have to lime for a few years to acheive an ideal pH range.
Yeah when I bought the home in January 2012 I tested and I had a ph of 4.9, I have done to apps of dolomite lime 40lb per 1000 each time to get it where it's at today.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 10-10-2013, 11:11 AM
Skipster Skipster is online now
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulfjoe View Post
Yeah when I bought the home in January 2012 I tested and I had a ph of 4.9, I have done to apps of dolomite lime 40lb per 1000 each time to get it where it's at today.
Posted via Mobile Device
Sounds like you're doing the right thing and making progress!
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 10-10-2013, 05:37 PM
Will P.C. Will P.C. is offline
LawnSite Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 939
Quote:
Originally Posted by gulfjoe View Post
Yeah when I bought the home in January 2012 I tested and I had a ph of 4.9, I have done to apps of dolomite lime 40lb per 1000 each time to get it where it's at today.
Posted via Mobile Device
I like to hit my yard in mid Sept (when grass growth starts to slow) with a heavy app of Milorganite. When mid october rolls around and other yard and starting to thin and brown, I still have a vibrant green with just a hint of brown.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:36 PM.

Page generated in 0.08321 seconds with 10 queries