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  #51  
Old 10-13-2013, 10:45 AM
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cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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"Choose" not "Chose" I think you should either be a year round monthly service or not, don't let the customer choose because they will choose the cheapest route.and it will be really hard to keep up with all the different methods of payments once you get a lot of clients.
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  #52  
Old 10-13-2013, 10:53 AM
birddseedd birddseedd is online now
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Thanks. i thought i had fixed those already.

problem with letting people choose summer vs winter services is i have customers that do not want mowing, and i have customers that do not want plowing. I do not want to turn away most of my customers for that. cant afford it atm.

do you think choosing he services is more clear now with the boxes. easy to understand?
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wait why do you prefer Scag? I thought you owned a Bobcat that mowed the first American Colonies
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  #53  
Old 10-13-2013, 01:09 PM
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cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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Make the mowing customers choose year round service, one year round monthly rate. Let the plowing customers remain plowing customers.
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  #54  
Old 10-13-2013, 01:24 PM
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Agape Agape is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rootytalbot View Post
Being serious here ---
Wow. That's a lot to read. Some could be omitted. Most average homeowners do not like a lot legal mumbo jumbo in my (unproven, just guessing) opinion.
I could not read it all. Does it have a clause that says if any part of the contract is found "not enforceable" the rest remains in force.

Too much stuff for my taste. I mean, I like it, but just figuring that out of 10 "free estimates", you will be the only one with a contract. That much reading might be a turn off to some folks. It might work on established clients, though. And it does not seem balanced. It seems to favor the author a little.

Who let's "some yard guy" write down their card number with security code, et al? Not me, that's for sure. I would need a security reference in there that assures me that my card number is safe, at the very least.

Maybe do a front and back. Legal crap on the front and break it into paragraphs with headers and then put all the multitude of service offerings on the back. And spread them out a little. It kinda reminds me of one of those health forms that asks if you have ever had any of the "following 500 dieases" -- and then there is a yes/no check box with 500 hundred diseases listed.

Rip rip tear. "Hey honey, what was the name of that kid with mower behind his bike? You still got his number?"
I disagree. You should be able to explain what it means if they ask, but whats the point of having a contract if it doesn't completely protect you.

I would have them choose their desired services and prices separately and write it in the contract as an item/price agreement.

I don't have contracts for my maintenance, but I have auto-pay application forms that say to run the card for landscape services (no amount).
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  #55  
Old 10-13-2013, 01:27 PM
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Agape Agape is offline
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get rid of #7
whats the point of a contract if they can cancel any time?
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  #56  
Old 10-13-2013, 08:34 PM
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Outdoors_Unlimited Outdoors_Unlimited is offline
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Originally Posted by Agape View Post
get rid of #7
whats the point of a contract if they can cancel any time?
I dont have "contracts" I have agreements.

My agreement is basically a contract, but can be cancelled at any time. The point of having my contract, is so I can get paid, and I also have a few liability releases in them, though I dont want to try their strength against one of my clients attorneys (a statement about kids toys not being my responsibility, and also one protecting myself in case we break a decorative display something or another with a blower. I blow many things other than the grass we cut, and decorations can get expensive fast.)
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  #57  
Old 10-13-2013, 09:41 PM
Roger Roger is offline
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I just found this thread. What interesting reading.

Somebody asked the critical question: What is the point of having a contract if it can be cancelled at any time?

Also, somebody said "... so I get paid ...."

The cancellation question negates any value in your contract. I think the OP even said it bind the customer to nothing. If this be the case, why bother? Contracts are established to bind two parties to something. When the document does not bind anything, then it is worthless. A simple letter of understanding of the services, with prices, is adequate.

What good is this document when you show up at the property, and another contractor has just been there to mow, remove snow, trim bushes, or some other service? Who is going to bother going to court over the small dollar amounts of these services? I don't think the OP is considering a $10,000 landscape install, rather simple, menial tasks of mowing, trimming, or snow removal.

As far as being paid, the honesty and integrity of the homeowner will determine whether you get paid or not. Having such a document does nothing to assure getting paid. Yes, the pricing structure is spelled out, but the simple letter of understanding does the same thing. Even if you file a small claims court case, the only thing you will gain is affirmation that your bill is unpaid. Both parties know this before going to court. The court does nothing to get the outstanding money into your bank account. Neither does the document proposed by the OP.

Trying to establish a legal relationship with your customer base creates a less-than-personal business relationship. Presenting such a document for lawn mowing fosters a tone of lack of trust. This happens right at the onset of the relationship, "... I may not trust you, so we need to have a legal, binding document to cement the relationship...." However, since it is not even binding, the tone has been set for no good reason.

In my 18 years of service, I have never been asked for a contract.

If somebody came to my door wanting to mow my lawn, and gave me such a document, the only outstanding question would be how far away would the laughter be heard.
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  #58  
Old 10-14-2013, 01:10 AM
birddseedd birddseedd is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger View Post
I just found this thread. What interesting reading.

Somebody asked the critical question: What is the point of having a contract if it can be cancelled at any time?

Also, somebody said "... so I get paid ...."

The cancellation question negates any value in your contract. I think the OP even said it bind the customer to nothing. If this be the case, why bother? Contracts are established to bind two parties to something. When the document does not bind anything, then it is worthless. A simple letter of understanding of the services, with prices, is adequate.

What good is this document when you show up at the property, and another contractor has just been there to mow, remove snow, trim bushes, or some other service? Who is going to bother going to court over the small dollar amounts of these services? I don't think the OP is considering a $10,000 landscape install, rather simple, menial tasks of mowing, trimming, or snow removal.

As far as being paid, the honesty and integrity of the homeowner will determine whether you get paid or not. Having such a document does nothing to assure getting paid. Yes, the pricing structure is spelled out, but the simple letter of understanding does the same thing. Even if you file a small claims court case, the only thing you will gain is affirmation that your bill is unpaid. Both parties know this before going to court. The court does nothing to get the outstanding money into your bank account. Neither does the document proposed by the OP.

Trying to establish a legal relationship with your customer base creates a less-than-personal business relationship. Presenting such a document for lawn mowing fosters a tone of lack of trust. This happens right at the onset of the relationship, "... I may not trust you, so we need to have a legal, binding document to cement the relationship...." However, since it is not even binding, the tone has been set for no good reason.

In my 18 years of service, I have never been asked for a contract.

If somebody came to my door wanting to mow my lawn, and gave me such a document, the only outstanding question would be how far away would the laughter be heard.
I have been to court in which the customer denied responsibility paying a bill. The point of this contract mainly is to show that the customer agrees to being responsible for paying the bill. Recently I had to sue an old customer, he actually wrote up a letter and tried to tell the judge that he wrote me a letter to cancel services. of course the letter was a lie, but the fact is people will try to get out of paying their bill. i have people that have signed a contract still not paying until i take them to court.

One thing that i find is that the people unwilling to sign a no commitment contract, are the ones that are trying to take you for a months worth of service.

not to mention this does release me of certain liabilities and such. but the main function. lays out the price and the customers willingness to pay the price.

Some customers do not like the idea of signing a contract, all of them that have brought this up forgot about it once i point out that they can cancel services. for the most part they do not mind committing to paying for services, they just do not want to be locked into it for a year.
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