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Old 10-11-2013, 10:19 AM
elliefert elliefert is offline
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NPK ratios

How many NPK ratios are available now on markets?


If I wanna category them, is there a way to do so?
As small, medium, large?

thx
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Old 10-11-2013, 12:25 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is offline
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There are lots of ratios. And...if you include custom ratios that any country elevator can make up for you, there are hundreds. A lot depends on the starting material and the percent of inerts in the starting materials. I am sure there is a computer program to calculate the possible ratios somewhere, (given certain base materials).
For instance I went to my supplier and asked for a special analysis ratio of 41-0-6.5...and eventually he agreed to make it and bag 4 tons for me.
Of course, 46-0-0 is the maximum urea ratio possible--you cannot get to 47 or 50-0-0 with urea. Likewise you cannot exceed 62 in a potash mixture as 0-0-62 is the maximum possible using potassium chloride.

For turf a high ratio of slow release is very important. However, opinions vary and some products are not suitable for certain grass types, soils or climates. There are regional laws, preferences and recommendations. Different seasonal ratios are often advised--and ratios exist to reduce disease or increase organic matter
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Old 10-11-2013, 02:20 PM
elliefert elliefert is offline
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make sense and interesting

Do you know there would be maximum limits if it is liquid?


Quote:
Originally Posted by RigglePLC View Post
There are lots of ratios. And...if you include custom ratios that any country elevator can make up for you, there are hundreds. A lot depends on the starting material and the percent of inerts in the starting materials. I am sure there is a computer program to calculate the possible ratios somewhere, (given certain base materials).
For instance I went to my supplier and asked for a special analysis ratio of 41-0-6.5...and eventually he agreed to make it and bag 4 tons for me.
Of course, 46-0-0 is the maximum urea ratio possible--you cannot get to 47 or 50-0-0 with urea. Likewise you cannot exceed 62 in a potash mixture as 0-0-62 is the maximum possible using potassium chloride.

For turf a high ratio of slow release is very important. However, opinions vary and some products are not suitable for certain grass types, soils or climates. There are regional laws, preferences and recommendations. Different seasonal ratios are often advised--and ratios exist to reduce disease or increase organic matter
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:53 PM
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jonthepain jonthepain is offline
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Old 10-14-2013, 10:44 AM
Smallaxe Smallaxe is offline
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What you would want to know is how much product to put down to achieve 1 pound of actual N per thousand sq. ft. or perhaps .5 pounds of N/k... then know how much potassium you want per thousand and what the NPK percentages will give you what you want/need for a particular application...

You may loose sight of the goal by overthinking the procedure ,,, backwards...
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:04 AM
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foreplease foreplease is offline
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I agree with axe, here, and would add: the rate of application you choose should be tailored to the N source and type of extended release, if any. Also, think in terms of season-long ratios and rates. If you are removing clippings, assume you are mining K out of your lawns and adjust accordingly - some say this can be as much as 1# K/M per year.
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