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Old 11-06-2013, 05:14 PM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
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Tiger striping during transition

One of my favorite periods of the year is during the transition of hybrid Bermuda grass to dormancy. We get what over heard called "tiger stripes."

I've never found the actual real cause for this but I've always attributed it to uneven frost and roller coaster of cold nights then warm nights. Eventually everything will go 100% brown.
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Old 11-06-2013, 06:15 PM
RAlmaroad RAlmaroad is online now
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Looks like some of those virus and bacteria under the microscope.
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:57 PM
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RigglePLC RigglePLC is online now
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tiger stripes on Bermuda

Mysterious! I never saw anything like this before.
Is the green part more mature or deeper roots than the brown parts?
You say it only happens in the fall, right?
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Old 11-07-2013, 08:42 AM
grassmasterswilson grassmasterswilson is online now
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It's a hybrid Bermuda and we start to see it after the first frost. It's always interesting to see? I've seen numerous lawns and golf courses with it.

I've always thought it might have something to do with the uneven frost. Maybe a frost followed by a few warm days?

No damage is ever done and after a few more frost the entire lawn is brown.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:39 AM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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I think it is because of the slightly different height's of the grass itself reacting to the frost. 1/8" can make a big difference in temperature in the first 6" above ground level.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:56 AM
44DCNF 44DCNF is offline
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Were these lawns where it happens established by plugs? Runner/Rhizome growth habits related to deeper roots? Filled in area between plugs/starts being less established go to dormancy sooner? Fracturing of soil as it dessicates leaving paths of least resistance for transfer of or blockage of air/moisture to roots? Does this happen year to year on the same lawns, or is it a one time appearance, or does it change in density from year to year if it returns?
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:12 AM
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Nice photo, Wilson! Amazing! Did someone plant the hybrid Bermuda in an unusual pattern? LOL! Impossible of course.
It must be a biological cause. Do you notice that the green parts are all about 3 inches wide--not more nor less. And the brown parts are about 6 inches wide seldom, more nor less.
What is underground? Tiger stripe soil? LOL! Or...deeper roots and shallow roots.

Why does it happen on some lawns and not others?

Why in some years and not others?

Are any hybrids known to be more susceptible to this? Tif 419? Did you find out what sod farm supplied this?

Why is it green in the front left corner? And along the sidewalk? What about the circle of brown in the background?

Last edited by RigglePLC; 11-07-2013 at 11:17 AM. Reason: add
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Old 11-07-2013, 06:35 PM
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All of our bermudas look like this almost every year. Even the common bermudas, if they are thick lawns. We usually get a frost before the grasses go dormant. 2-3 days after the frost, lawns look like this in areas where the frost occured. The hybrids show it more than the commons.

The green areas by the house are still green because the house "blocked" the frost.

This spring, we had a late frost after bermudas had come out. Several of my lawns, looked like this then as well. My guy, had just sprayed a few of those lawns, then we got the frost. A couple of days later, he was freaking, thinking that he had done it.
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:17 PM
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My common seeded Bermuda does this in spots as well. Not near as uniform as Wilson's. Asjad004 said any area shielded from frost ( tree line, house ) is still somewhat green. My lawn is as thick as it can be. Curious what the definitive reason is.
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:00 PM
georgialawn88 georgialawn88 is offline
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my lawn looks exactly like this as well as my neighbors. infact everyone around me looks like this. i think its cool every year. In a week it will al be brown. got another frost coming in about 8 days
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