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  #11  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:04 PM
georgialawn88 georgialawn88 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A. W. Landscapers, Inc. View Post
Still working on it myself.

You need to create systems. Then you use these systems to train your replacements (employees). Keep replacing yourself in various aspects of your company's operations and eventually you will have a company that is pretty much self sufficient.

I've convinced myself that this is the process to follow:

First step is to remove yourself from all physical labor duties (your focus is on sales, job site management, accounting, business operations, executive management).

Step two is to remove yourself from daily business operations. A good operations manager should be able to handle almost every aspect of running the office/scheduling/ordering/bookkeeping/accounts payable/accounts receivable/human resources/marketing/etc. (your focus is on sales, job site management, executive management).

Step 3 is to remove yourself from job site management (your focus is on sales, executive management, and you start to reinsert yourself into some of the accounting functions because as your company grows your operations manager will start to become overwhelmed with the workload).

Step 4 is to remove yourself from sales (your focus is on executive management and you fully reinsert yourself into the accounting functions so that the operations manager can focus his/her attention on everything else).

Step 5 is to remove yourself from accounting (your focus is now solely on executive management).

Step 6 is to remove yourself from executive management by hiring a CEO (your focus is to communicate to the CEO your desired path for the company's direction and then sit back and watch it happen while you count the money).

Note: I also think it might be possible to switch steps 4 and 5.


very good post here
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:53 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpllawncare View Post
A small business can offer "Soft benefits" IE:Taking the guys to lunch on fridays, small bonuses for a good job no call backs a day off on their b-day a small Christmas bonus making the guys feel appreciated day in day out. I let my guys use the trucks if they need it for something, just small stuff.
When I have had people work for me I am usually pretty generous. I usually pay for lunch, drinks, gas money sometimes. I did make it pretty easy. Thats not easy when you run more than one person.
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  #13  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:54 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Originally Posted by Armsden&Son View Post
How do you keep them happy, planted, and wanting to come to work? By offering things that other organizations can't. Unfortunately, small businesses have trouble doing this because of a lack of capital. In my opinion, one needs to think outside of the box in order to retain employees in the current financial and social climate...
Exactly, the other thing is providing work year around...
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  #14  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:56 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayor of Mow Town View Post
There's a great book called "Drive" by Daniel Pink which talks about what motivates people/employees. It's an easy read, with heaps of examples and based on real research.

Well worth taking the time to check it out. It certainly changed my perspective on how to motivate employees.
http://www.amazon.com/Drive-Surprisi...by+daniel+pink Buying it now, looks good
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  #15  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:58 PM
Zackster Zackster is offline
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There's a good book that talks all about Systems and so forth for the landscape business.

The E Myth for the Landscape Contractor, by Michael E Gerber. I highly recommend it.
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  #16  
Old 11-21-2013, 09:59 PM
newguy123 newguy123 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCLawn and more View Post
Exactly, the other thing is providing work year around...
I think one thing that's hard to do, but a necessity, is create in their mind ownership in the company. Not actually owning, but taking pride in their work and in ownership.

For example...I was in the military. I took great pride in what I did, I took ownership in being a great troop and taking care of our equipment $600,000 vehicles. The goal is to create a vision/mission statement that people can buy into and believe, and want to be a PART of.

I know this is very different, Military vs. Lawn Care, and that's why it is hard to do, but necessary.

The other option is to offer crew leaders, managers, etc. bonuses when routes/jobs are completed on time, under time, etc.
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  #17  
Old 11-21-2013, 10:01 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zackster View Post
There's a good book that talks all about Systems and so forth for the landscape business.

The E Myth for the Landscape Contractor, by Michael E Gerber. I highly recommend it.
ive heard that book float around on here a lot
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  #18  
Old 11-21-2013, 10:03 PM
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JCLawn and more JCLawn and more is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy123 View Post
I think one thing that's hard to do, but a necessity, is create in their mind ownership in the company. Not actually owning, but taking pride in their work and in ownership.

For example...I was in the military. I took great pride in what I did, I took ownership in being a great troop and taking care of our equipment $600,000 vehicles. The goal is to create a vision/mission statement that people can buy into and believe, and want to be a PART of.

I know this is very different, Military vs. Lawn Care, and that's why it is hard to do, but necessary.

The other option is to offer crew leaders, managers, etc. bonuses when routes/jobs are completed on time, under time, etc.
This is one idea I want to try, but haven't got anywhere. Maybe I should ask the couple of people who worked for me in the past. Ownership is hard to instill. For some its natural, but very few.
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  #19  
Old 11-21-2013, 10:32 PM
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cpllawncare cpllawncare is offline
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It all starts with the interview process, DO YOU EVEN CONDUCT A FORMAL interview? Don't HIRE people, RECRUIT people, make it so people are WANTING to work for you, create a culture for your company that says "Man I WISH I COULD GET A POSITION WITH THAT COMPANY" You need a formal recruiting system, tell people you only recruit the best of the best, think about how the military does it, they don't hire anyone they recruit.
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  #20  
Old 11-21-2013, 10:58 PM
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TriCityLawnCareLLC TriCityLawnCareLLC is offline
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Good thoughts
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