Register free!
Search
 
     

Click for Weather
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 11-03-2013, 07:14 PM
fl-landscapes's Avatar
fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,377
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
7 GPM and 100 PSI is enough to route some flow for agitation and still have 100 at the end of the hose. Good set up.
Thanks. It works well, time will tell how long it holds up.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-03-2013, 07:19 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
It never fails that people have a few pest prone plants in areas not convenient to unroll a hose to. So I have another engine drive backpack reserved for that purpose. Hike over there and start shooting.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-03-2013, 07:25 PM
fl-landscapes's Avatar
fl-landscapes fl-landscapes is offline
LawnSite Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 2,377
Quote:
Originally Posted by greendoctor View Post
It never fails that people have a few pest prone plants in areas not convenient to unroll a hose to. So I have another engine drive backpack reserved for that purpose. Hike over there and start shooting.
We are flat as a pool table here and can drag hose almost anywhere but I do use the battery backpack sometimes for that. I have one set up with double cone nozzles just for that and on highest setting works pretty well.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-03-2013, 07:30 PM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
Much better than that stainless steel and brass backpack I used to use. Imagine hiking up and down with that. Oh, right and having to pump like crazy to make it work. I do enough hiking that batteries are not something I would bet the farm on. Rather have an engine. I use ceramic disc core nozzles on a double swivel and a two handed tree gun for high stuff.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-05-2013, 08:19 PM
BugBlaster BugBlaster is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 6
So dinotefuran works, what about imidacloprid?
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-07-2013, 12:39 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
Imidacloprid is not mobile enough in the plant. Takes too long to go up. It might work as a preventative, however dinotefuran + a knockdown spray is how I do mine. The knockdown spray includes oil and an IGR. Most insecticides save for organophosphates are useless against Asian Cycad Scale.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12-07-2013, 07:13 AM
BugBlaster BugBlaster is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 6
Forgive the dumb questions, I do structural pest, but am getting licensed for lawn and ornamental. Primarily to treat sagos. Last year I saw a few, but this year it is every sago I see has them, so I have to start doing it.

Is it better to inject? I can do that easy with an electric backpack and quick connect to a termite rod. To do a standard 3 foot sago what is the normal amount of safari and quantity of water to use? I've read the label but can't quite get my head around the specifics.
Posted via Mobile Device
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12-09-2013, 08:01 AM
Sprayjockey Sprayjockey is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Gainesville Florida
Posts: 4
A soil drench with a five gallon bucket is very easy and works really good!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12-11-2013, 01:34 AM
greendoctor greendoctor is offline
LawnSite Fanatic
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 7,412
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugBlaster View Post
Forgive the dumb questions, I do structural pest, but am getting licensed for lawn and ornamental. Primarily to treat sagos. Last year I saw a few, but this year it is every sago I see has them, so I have to start doing it.

Is it better to inject? I can do that easy with an electric backpack and quick connect to a termite rod. To do a standard 3 foot sago what is the normal amount of safari and quantity of water to use? I've read the label but can't quite get my head around the specifics.
Posted via Mobile Device
There is a dose listed per foot of plant height. The question of injecting depends on your soil and what is around your target plant. If I have ground covers, other border plants, etc around the target plant. my preference goes towards injecting. If the plant is in clay or other tight soil, injecting is better. If it is on mostly sand and there is nothing around it, I drench or apply a low volume band around the plant. A hedge of some kind growing on sand is a candidate for a banded application. Note that the absorbing roots on most plants including Sago palm is in the first few inches of soil and not more than 8" from the trunk. There are also absorbing roots directly under plants. No need to go deep or far from the trunk of a plant.
__________________
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.
Benjamin Franklin 1775

Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power.
Benjamin Franklin Poor Richard's Almanac1738
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-11-2013, 07:53 AM
BugBlaster BugBlaster is offline
LawnSite Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 6
We have very clayey soil so if you put much volume on the soil surface it starts running away. That's good info on the shape and size of the roots. Thanks. Part of my confusion is how to measure the height of a sago. Often the trunk will be 6 inches high and the fronds go up 3 feet, so would you apply the dose for the trunk height or frond height?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1998 - 2012, LawnSite.comô - Moose River Media
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:00 AM.

Page generated in 0.06959 seconds with 10 queries