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  #11  
Old 01-25-2014, 05:55 PM
clayslandscape clayslandscape is offline
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any more input? Hoping to do this job this week
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  #12  
Old 01-25-2014, 07:15 PM
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1idejim 1idejim is online now
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French drains are both easy to do and / or easy to screw up. Money invested in a soils analysis and a consultation with a civil engineer is money well spent.
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  #13  
Old 01-26-2014, 11:03 AM
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F4rm3rj03 F4rm3rj03 is offline
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Location: Winfield, Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clayslandscape View Post
I have a commercial acct. that I have and they have asked me to install some sort of drainage to get the water away from the building and to the street. It is a total of 127ft around the three walls then I would need to pipe it a total of 40ft to get to the street.

What would you all do? Would you French drain this 127 ft? 3 ft wide? The azaleas will be removed during the process
What is their budget? Are they having a water issue in the building or just being proactive?

Something I would consider would be a regrade around the building. A small tractor with a box blade would do a great job at making a swale. Even with that tree there I feel confident my Bx-25 could do the job. Hopefully the grade of building and sidewalks & roads are not in conflict.
My concern that is hard to see in the photos is how high is the soil level now to the building. Has the soil "grown" to cover the point where the concrete slab meets the brick and could moisture seep into the building due through such? This could be a good selling point.
My initial approach would be a making a swale starting at the building to 6-10' out from the building due to the tree (If it stays). No french drain, but catches instead if any. No gravel but turf in swale. Perhaps a foot or two from building a low growing ground cover could be installed too?
If the tree was to be removed, stump dug out, and roots dug (stump grinding is a sin), the whole area could be graded proper. Would open the door for all new landscaping and sod. Fresh new look!
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  #14  
Old 01-26-2014, 12:39 PM
clayslandscape clayslandscape is offline
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Location: Blackstone, Va.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F4rm3rj03 View Post
What is their budget? Are they having a water issue in the building or just being proactive?

Something I would consider would be a regrade around the building. A small tractor with a box blade would do a great job at making a swale. Even with that tree there I feel confident my Bx-25 could do the job. Hopefully the grade of building and sidewalks & roads are not in conflict.
My concern that is hard to see in the photos is how high is the soil level now to the building. Has the soil "grown" to cover the point where the concrete slab meets the brick and could moisture seep into the building due through such? This could be a good selling point.
My initial approach would be a making a swale starting at the building to 6-10' out from the building due to the tree (If it stays). No french drain, but catches instead if any. No gravel but turf in swale. Perhaps a foot or two from building a low growing ground cover could be installed too?
If the tree was to be removed, stump dug out, and roots dug (stump grinding is a sin), the whole area could be graded proper. Would open the door for all new landscaping and sod. Fresh new look!
That's the problem is that dirt is already as high as it possibly can be.
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  #15  
Old 01-26-2014, 09:49 PM
agrostis agrostis is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Winston-Salem NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by F4rm3rj03 View Post
What is their budget? Are they having a water issue in the building or just being proactive?

Something I would consider would be a regrade around the building. A small tractor with a box blade would do a great job at making a swale. Even with that tree there I feel confident my Bx-25 could do the job. Hopefully the grade of building and sidewalks & roads are not in conflict.
My concern that is hard to see in the photos is how high is the soil level now to the building. Has the soil "grown" to cover the point where the concrete slab meets the brick and could moisture seep into the building due through such? This could be a good selling point.
My initial approach would be a making a swale starting at the building to 6-10' out from the building due to the tree (If it stays). No french drain, but catches instead if any. No gravel but turf in swale. Perhaps a foot or two from building a low growing ground cover could be installed too?
If the tree was to be removed, stump dug out, and roots dug (stump grinding is a sin), the whole area could be graded proper. Would open the door for all new landscaping and sod. Fresh new look!
Why is stump grinding a sin?
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  #16  
Old 01-27-2014, 09:47 AM
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Crimson Lawn Crimson Lawn is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Liberty, Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1idejim View Post
French drains are both easy to do and / or easy to screw up. Money invested in a soils analysis and a consultation with a civil engineer is money well spent.
Posted via Mobile Device
What he said. Appears the ground is compacted and level.
I do a few of these every year hear. Some are simple with no trees and good slope. Some have almost no where to go with trees, landscaping and concrete. Consulting a civil engineer on this one is the way I would go.
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  #17  
Old 01-27-2014, 09:50 AM
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F4rm3rj03 F4rm3rj03 is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Winfield, Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agrostis View Post
Why is stump grinding a sin?
First reason is try planting another tree in that same spot. You will be digging with an axe. Nobody seems interested in truly grinding all of the stump. Ends up costing more due to additional labor.
Second reason is the settling that will happen. The best way to ensure no to little settling 5+ years later is to physically remove the stump. If budget & plans allows, remove the large roots. Otherwise, fill dirt will be added later, and either sod or seed used. This happens after a person "lives" with the sink in their yard and decide they are tired of seeing it.
Third reason is when they decide to deal with the sink, they will most likely talk to their mower guys. Who in my part of the world, seems to think throwing some dirt over it and laying sod without even properly edging the new sod in to result in a seamless installation is acceptable, gets the job. Then unfortunately the home owner is okay with it because the mower guy's bid was less than half of my bid. Now they got a lump instead of a sump. But they got what they paid for I guess.
If they didn't talk to the mower guy, I get to dig it up anyways.
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  #18  
Old 02-10-2014, 10:32 PM
Lawnwizzard Lawnwizzard is offline
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Posts: 7
Question are you licensed to do this kind of work ?
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