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Old 02-21-2014, 07:00 AM
Richie@ Richie@ is offline
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Location: Virginia Beach , Va
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What is Happening to Lighting Today

Part 1 - Bulbs & Standards


As of Jan. 1, 2014, you will have a harder time finding the older style incandescent 40 and 60 watt bulbs, as the last phase of new federal lighting standards begins. “What this means that those who have not already transitioned to energy-saving compact fluorescent (CFL) and light emitting diode (LED) bulbs will need to do so as remaining inventories of the traditional incandescent light bulbs are sold out,” according to the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

According to the U.S. Dept. of Energy, new lighting standards were enacted in 2007, with a phase in period from 2012 to 2014. The standards do not ban a specific type of bulb; however they require that new lighting use as least 25 percent less energy while producing the same amount of light. Up to 90 percent of the electricity used by incandescent bulbs is converted to heat rather than light, and as a result, incandescent bulbs have been phased out, beginning with 100 watt bulbs in 2012; 75 watt bulbs in 2013; and 60 watt and 40 watt bulbs in 2014. Specialty bulbs, for example those used in certain appliances, are exempt from the new standards.

The Department of Energy estimates that changing 15 incandescent bulbs could save about $50 per year in household energy costs; and that the new lighting standards will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and could save U.S. households nearly $6 billion in 2015 alone.

Both CFL and LED bulbs are available in different sizes and light color options, and many are suitable for outdoor use and can be used with dimmer switches. Most can be used with existing lamps and fixtures, and are available at retailers nationwide. As a comparison, a 60 watt incandescent bulb provides 13 to 14 lumens of light per watt, while equivalent CFL bulbs provide 55 to 70 lumens per watt and LED bulbs from 60 to 100 lumens per watt.

This is a 5-part series on residential and commercial lighting:

Bulbs and Standards
Incandescent lighting
Fluorescent lighting
Light Emitting Diode lighting
Lighting Control systems
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Old 02-21-2014, 07:52 AM
INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting's Avatar
INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Muskoka, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 3,929
Are you reporting only or looking for commentary and remarks?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie@ View Post
Part 1 - Bulbs & Standards


As of Jan. 1, 2014, you will have a harder time finding the older style incandescent 40 and 60 watt bulbs, as the last phase of new federal lighting standards begins. “What this means that those who have not already transitioned to energy-saving compact fluorescent (CFL) and light emitting diode (LED) bulbs will need to do so as remaining inventories of the traditional incandescent light bulbs are sold out,” according to the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

According to the U.S. Dept. of Energy, new lighting standards were enacted in 2007, with a phase in period from 2012 to 2014. The standards do not ban a specific type of bulb; however they require that new lighting use as least 25 percent less energy while producing the same amount of light. Up to 90 percent of the electricity used by incandescent bulbs is converted to heat rather than light, and as a result, incandescent bulbs have been phased out, beginning with 100 watt bulbs in 2012; 75 watt bulbs in 2013; and 60 watt and 40 watt bulbs in 2014. Specialty bulbs, for example those used in certain appliances, are exempt from the new standards.

The Department of Energy estimates that changing 15 incandescent bulbs could save about $50 per year in household energy costs; and that the new lighting standards will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and could save U.S. households nearly $6 billion in 2015 alone.

Both CFL and LED bulbs are available in different sizes and light color options, and many are suitable for outdoor use and can be used with dimmer switches. Most can be used with existing lamps and fixtures, and are available at retailers nationwide. As a comparison, a 60 watt incandescent bulb provides 13 to 14 lumens of light per watt, while equivalent CFL bulbs provide 55 to 70 lumens per watt and LED bulbs from 60 to 100 lumens per watt.

This is a 5-part series on residential and commercial lighting:

Bulbs and Standards
Incandescent lighting
Fluorescent lighting
Light Emitting Diode lighting
Lighting Control systems
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Old 02-21-2014, 07:57 AM
Richie@ Richie@ is offline
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Location: Virginia Beach , Va
Posts: 171
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Originally Posted by INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting View Post
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It is a news letter from Mike Holt NEC code Guru.

http://www.mikeholt.com/
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